Discussion:
Roseanne
Add Reply
Stefan Ram
2017-04-19 23:11:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
I sometimes watch »Roseanne«, so that I can pick up
some spoken English.

Recently I made two English-related observations in
»Roseanne«:

1.) Darlene has a book called »Language Roundup« (apparently
for her school).

2.) There is a discussion about the meaning of two
English words in »Roseanne«, quote:

Sylvia: »What exactly is the difference between a highway and
a byway?«

Vonda: »A highway is the main road, right? And the byway is
the road that runs right along by it.«

Crystal: »No. No, that's an access road. A byway is a road
that goes around something.«

Vonda: »No, that's a bypass.«

Juanita: »There is no difference between a highway and a
byway.«

end quote. (first aired 1988-11-29)
Tony Cooper
2017-04-19 23:20:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Stefan Ram
I sometimes watch »Roseanne«, so that I can pick up
some spoken English.
Recently I made two English-related observations in
1.) Darlene has a book called »Language Roundup« (apparently
for her school).
2.) There is a discussion about the meaning of two
Sylvia: »What exactly is the difference between a highway and
a byway?«
Vonda: »A highway is the main road, right? And the byway is
the road that runs right along by it.«
Crystal: »No. No, that's an access road. A byway is a road
that goes around something.«
Vonda: »No, that's a bypass.«
Juanita: »There is no difference between a highway and a
byway.«
end quote. (first aired 1988-11-29)
Juanita is right. A "byway" cab be just a highway that is not a main
highway. A road that is to little traveled it would not be considered
as a "highway" can be called a "byway".

However, there is no such thing as an actual byway. We have roads
that are labeled as highways, but none that are labeled as byways.
It's just a term that we apply in general to the less-traveled roads.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Garrett Wollman
2017-04-20 02:22:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
However, there is no such thing as an actual byway. We have roads
that are labeled as highways, but none that are labeled as byways.
It's just a term that we apply in general to the less-traveled roads.
Actually, that's not true. There is in fact a "National Scenic Byway"
program -- I don't know who runs it, but I've seen the signs.

But it is true insofar as the "scenic byways" are not *named*
"such-and-so byway" -- that's just a label, not really different in
nature from a route number.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Tony Cooper
2017-04-20 02:38:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Tony Cooper
However, there is no such thing as an actual byway. We have roads
that are labeled as highways, but none that are labeled as byways.
It's just a term that we apply in general to the less-traveled roads.
Actually, that's not true. There is in fact a "National Scenic Byway"
program -- I don't know who runs it, but I've seen the signs.
In Florida, those routes are labeled "Scenic Route", but the website
calls the "Florida Scenic Highways".

http://floridascenichighways.com/ The website map labels some with
the word "byways".

These "labels" are signs along the road, but the road itself has a
name. For example, "A1A Scenic and Historic Coast Byway" is seen on
the state-placed signs every few miles, but the road is Highway A1A.

The signs look like this:
Loading Image...

No road that I know of is name (something) Byway. Maps and GPS units
identify it as the name of the route. ie: A1A.

Also, some roads have signs that state that the road is part of the
Great Florida Birding Trail.
Loading Image...
Post by Garrett Wollman
But it is true insofar as the "scenic byways" are not *named*
"such-and-so byway" -- that's just a label, not really different in
nature from a route number.
-GAWollman
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-20 23:00:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Tony Cooper
However, there is no such thing as an actual byway. We have roads
that are labeled as highways, but none that are labeled as byways.
It's just a term that we apply in general to the less-traveled roads.
Actually, that's not true. There is in fact a "National Scenic Byway"
program -- I don't know who runs it, but I've seen the signs.
In Florida, those routes are labeled "Scenic Route", but the website
calls the "Florida Scenic Highways".
http://floridascenichighways.com/ The website map labels some with
the word "byways".
These "labels" are signs along the road, but the road itself has a
name. For example, "A1A Scenic and Historic Coast Byway" is seen on
the state-placed signs every few miles, but the road is Highway A1A.
http://www.visitflagler.com/core/fileparse.php/105601/urlt/0098518-scenic_a1a.jpg
No road that I know of is name (something) Byway. Maps and GPS units
identify it as the name of the route. ie: A1A.
Also, some roads have signs that state that the road is part of the
Great Florida Birding Trail.
http://l7.alamy.com/zooms/0640e4daedde44af9e337b2681733fd5/great-florida-birding-trail-sign-cedar-key-florida-united-states-usa-ceajx2.jpg
...

Which is quite sensible, as the only scenery in Florida is birds.
Well, I guess Bald Cypresses and Spanish Moss.
--
Jerry Friedman
Tony Cooper
2017-04-21 01:50:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 16:00:14 -0700 (PDT), Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Tony Cooper
However, there is no such thing as an actual byway. We have roads
that are labeled as highways, but none that are labeled as byways.
It's just a term that we apply in general to the less-traveled roads.
Actually, that's not true. There is in fact a "National Scenic Byway"
program -- I don't know who runs it, but I've seen the signs.
In Florida, those routes are labeled "Scenic Route", but the website
calls the "Florida Scenic Highways".
http://floridascenichighways.com/ The website map labels some with
the word "byways".
These "labels" are signs along the road, but the road itself has a
name. For example, "A1A Scenic and Historic Coast Byway" is seen on
the state-placed signs every few miles, but the road is Highway A1A.
http://www.visitflagler.com/core/fileparse.php/105601/urlt/0098518-scenic_a1a.jpg
No road that I know of is name (something) Byway. Maps and GPS units
identify it as the name of the route. ie: A1A.
Also, some roads have signs that state that the road is part of the
Great Florida Birding Trail.
http://l7.alamy.com/zooms/0640e4daedde44af9e337b2681733fd5/great-florida-birding-trail-sign-cedar-key-florida-united-states-usa-ceajx2.jpg
...
Which is quite sensible, as the only scenery in Florida is birds.
Well, I guess Bald Cypresses and Spanish Moss.
Taken on Miami Beach:
Loading Image...
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Moylan
2017-04-21 06:05:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
On Thu, 20 Apr 2017 16:00:14 -0700 (PDT), Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Tony Cooper
Also, some roads have signs that state that the road is part of the
Great Florida Birding Trail.
http://l7.alamy.com/zooms/0640e4daedde44af9e337b2681733fd5/great-florida-birding-trail-sign-cedar-key-florida-united-states-usa-ceajx2.jpg
...
Which is quite sensible, as the only scenery in Florida is birds.
Well, I guess Bald Cypresses and Spanish Moss.
https://photos.smugmug.com/Candids/i-s4fsN45/0/X3/2010-10-16-135b-X3.jpg
Birds.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Mark Brader
2017-04-20 03:21:03 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Tony Cooper
However, there is no such thing as an actual byway. We have roads
that are labeled as highways, but none that are labeled as byways.
It's just a term that we apply in general to the less-traveled roads.
Actually, that's not true. There is in fact a "National Scenic Byway"
program -- I don't know who runs it, but I've seen the signs.
Here's one of those signs that I saw last year in Colorado.
Post by Garrett Wollman
But it is true insofar as the "scenic byways" are not *named*
"such-and-so byway" -- that's just a label, not really different in
nature from a route number.
True, but it's still a way that the road is labeled.
--
Mark Brader | "I could be wrong."
Toronto | "Have you ever said that and actually meant it?"
***@vex.net | "No." --Willie Reale, "Blue Bloods"

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Tony Cooper
2017-04-20 03:56:42 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Tony Cooper
However, there is no such thing as an actual byway. We have roads
that are labeled as highways, but none that are labeled as byways.
It's just a term that we apply in general to the less-traveled roads.
Actually, that's not true. There is in fact a "National Scenic Byway"
program -- I don't know who runs it, but I've seen the signs.
Here's one of those signs that I saw last year in Colorado.
Post by Garrett Wollman
But it is true insofar as the "scenic byways" are not *named*
"such-and-so byway" -- that's just a label, not really different in
nature from a route number.
True, but it's still a way that the road is labeled.
Some of the scenic routes include more than one road. It's a route,
not a road.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-20 03:41:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Stefan Ram
I sometimes watch »Roseanne«, so that I can pick up
some spoken English.
Recently I made two English-related observations in
1.) Darlene has a book called »Language Roundup« (apparently
for her school).
2.) There is a discussion about the meaning of two
Sylvia: »What exactly is the difference between a highway and
a byway?«
Vonda: »A highway is the main road, right? And the byway is
the road that runs right along by it.«
Crystal: »No. No, that's an access road. A byway is a road
that goes around something.«
Vonda: »No, that's a bypass.«
Juanita: »There is no difference between a highway and a
byway.«
end quote. (first aired 1988-11-29)
Juanita is right. A "byway" cab be just a highway that is not a main
highway. A road that is to little traveled it would not be considered
as a "highway" can be called a "byway".
However, there is no such thing as an actual byway. We have roads
that are labeled as highways, but none that are labeled as byways.
It's just a term that we apply in general to the less-traveled roads.
... which are somehow not "actual byways"?
charles
2017-04-20 07:15:04 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Stefan Ram
I sometimes watch »Roseanne«, so that I can pick up
some spoken English.
Recently I made two English-related observations in
1.) Darlene has a book called »Language Roundup« (apparently
for her school).
2.) There is a discussion about the meaning of two
Sylvia: »What exactly is the difference between a highway and
a byway?«
Vonda: »A highway is the main road, right? And the byway is
the road that runs right along by it.«
Crystal: »No. No, that's an access road. A byway is a road
that goes around something.«
Vonda: »No, that's a bypass.«
Juanita: »There is no difference between a highway and a
byway.«
end quote. (first aired 1988-11-29)
Juanita is right. A "byway" cab be just a highway that is not a main
highway. A road that is to little traveled it would not be considered
as a "highway" can be called a "byway".
However, there is no such thing as an actual byway. We have roads
that are labeled as highways, but none that are labeled as byways.
It's just a term that we apply in general to the less-traveled roads.
Here we do have "Byways" - specifically "Byways open to all traffic" or
"BOATS". they are unmetalled tracks down which you nominally drive a car,
but could get stuck in mud or prevented from progressing by tree roots and
pot holes. Much favoured by motor cyclists whose activities tend to make
the byways impassable for anyones else.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
John Varela
2017-04-21 01:56:44 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 23:20:23 UTC, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Stefan Ram
I sometimes watch »Roseanne«, so that I can pick up
some spoken English.
Recently I made two English-related observations in
1.) Darlene has a book called »Language Roundup« (apparently
for her school).
2.) There is a discussion about the meaning of two
Sylvia: »What exactly is the difference between a highway and
a byway?«
Vonda: »A highway is the main road, right? And the byway is
the road that runs right along by it.«
Crystal: »No. No, that's an access road. A byway is a road
that goes around something.«
Vonda: »No, that's a bypass.«
Juanita: »There is no difference between a highway and a
byway.«
end quote. (first aired 1988-11-29)
Juanita is right. A "byway" cab be just a highway that is not a main
highway. A road that is to little traveled it would not be considered
as a "highway" can be called a "byway".
However, there is no such thing as an actual byway. We have roads
that are labeled as highways, but none that are labeled as byways.
It's just a term that we apply in general to the less-traveled roads.
virginiadot.org/programs/prog-byways.asp
--
John Varela
Loading...