Discussion:
priorize / prioritize
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p***@gmail.com
2017-04-19 18:28:30 UTC
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When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of that word and know that is not the intent of the user, therefore it can create confusion.

PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is congruent in meaning.

I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.

BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my experience. Just saying.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-04-19 18:44:17 UTC
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Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of that word
and know that is not the intent of the user, therefore it can create
confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my
experience. Just saying.
I find them both nasty and wouldn't use either. However, "prioritize"
is widely used, and I don't remember ever hearing "priorize" -- where
did you come across it?
--
athel
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-19 21:51:03 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 20:44:17 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of that word
and know that is not the intent of the user, therefore it can create
confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my
experience. Just saying.
I find them both nasty and wouldn't use either. However, "prioritize"
is widely used, and I don't remember ever hearing "priorize" -- where
did you come across it?
Is "priorize" used to mean the promotion of a monk?
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter Moylan
2017-04-19 22:59:07 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 20:44:17 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of that word
and know that is not the intent of the user, therefore it can create
confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my
experience. Just saying.
I find them both nasty and wouldn't use either. However, "prioritize"
is widely used, and I don't remember ever hearing "priorize" -- where
did you come across it?
Is "priorize" used to mean the promotion of a monk?
That is certainly the interpretation that occurred to me.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
RH Draney
2017-04-20 07:00:03 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 20:44:17 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of that word
and know that is not the intent of the user, therefore it can create
confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my
experience. Just saying.
I find them both nasty and wouldn't use either. However, "prioritize"
is widely used, and I don't remember ever hearing "priorize" -- where
did you come across it?
Is "priorize" used to mean the promotion of a monk?
That is certainly the interpretation that occurred to me.
I know it's not polite to stare, but you could hardly priorize off her
cleavage....r
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-20 03:29:38 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of that word
and know that is not the intent of the user, therefore it can create
confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my
experience. Just saying.
I find them both nasty and wouldn't use either. However, "prioritize"
is widely used, and I don't remember ever hearing "priorize" -- where
did you come across it?
In the 15-year-old message he responded to.
Don Phillipson
2017-04-19 21:39:38 UTC
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BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my
experience.
Probably so. The only people who need PRIORIZE are those who cannot
remember the verb RANK -- and democratic governments deliberately
avoid RANK because they know people dislike the suggestion insiders
rank higher than outsiders.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Quinn C
2017-04-19 22:01:04 UTC
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Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of
that word and know that is not the intent of the user,
therefore it can create confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is
congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is
lazy.
If to prioritize means establishing priority, then to priorize
means establishing a priory. It's only logical.
--
Who would know aught of art must learn and then take his ease.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-04-20 06:14:04 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of
that word and know that is not the intent of the user,
therefore it can create confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is
congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
If to prioritize means establishing priority, then to priorize
means establishing a priory. It's only logical.
Yes, but logic isn't much of a guide to meaning.
--
athel
Quinn C
2017-04-20 16:12:37 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Quinn C
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of
that word and know that is not the intent of the user,
therefore it can create confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is
congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
If to prioritize means establishing priority, then to priorize
means establishing a priory. It's only logical.
Yes, but logic isn't much of a guide to meaning.
Cor blimey!
--
The nice thing about standards is that you have so many to choose
from; furthermore, if you do not like any of them, you can just
wait for next year's model.
Andrew Tanenbaum, _Computer Networks_ (1981), p. 168.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-04-20 16:27:23 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Quinn C
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of
that word and know that is not the intent of the user,
therefore it can create confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is
congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
If to prioritize means establishing priority, then to priorize
means establishing a priory. It's only logical.
Yes, but logic isn't much of a guide to meaning.
Cor blimey!
You don't believe it? Maybe not, as you're German. My first wife worked
in a language school, of which most of the clients were German or
Spanish businessmen. The Germans were constantly complaining that
various characteristics of English were not logical.
--
athel
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