Discussion:
priorize / prioritize
(too old to reply)
p***@gmail.com
2017-04-19 18:28:30 UTC
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When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of that word and know that is not the intent of the user, therefore it can create confusion.

PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is congruent in meaning.

I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.

BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my experience. Just saying.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-04-19 18:44:17 UTC
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Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of that word
and know that is not the intent of the user, therefore it can create
confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my
experience. Just saying.
I find them both nasty and wouldn't use either. However, "prioritize"
is widely used, and I don't remember ever hearing "priorize" -- where
did you come across it?
--
athel
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-19 21:51:03 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 20:44:17 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of that word
and know that is not the intent of the user, therefore it can create
confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my
experience. Just saying.
I find them both nasty and wouldn't use either. However, "prioritize"
is widely used, and I don't remember ever hearing "priorize" -- where
did you come across it?
Is "priorize" used to mean the promotion of a monk?
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter Moylan
2017-04-19 22:59:07 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 20:44:17 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of that word
and know that is not the intent of the user, therefore it can create
confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my
experience. Just saying.
I find them both nasty and wouldn't use either. However, "prioritize"
is widely used, and I don't remember ever hearing "priorize" -- where
did you come across it?
Is "priorize" used to mean the promotion of a monk?
That is certainly the interpretation that occurred to me.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
RH Draney
2017-04-20 07:00:03 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 20:44:17 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of that word
and know that is not the intent of the user, therefore it can create
confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my
experience. Just saying.
I find them both nasty and wouldn't use either. However, "prioritize"
is widely used, and I don't remember ever hearing "priorize" -- where
did you come across it?
Is "priorize" used to mean the promotion of a monk?
That is certainly the interpretation that occurred to me.
I know it's not polite to stare, but you could hardly priorize off her
cleavage....r
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-20 03:29:38 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of that word
and know that is not the intent of the user, therefore it can create
confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my
experience. Just saying.
I find them both nasty and wouldn't use either. However, "prioritize"
is widely used, and I don't remember ever hearing "priorize" -- where
did you come across it?
In the 15-year-old message he responded to.
J. J. Lodder
2018-01-17 11:02:59 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of that word
and know that is not the intent of the user, therefore it can create
confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is congruent in meaning
.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by p***@gmail.com
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my
experience. Just saying.
I find them both nasty and wouldn't use either. However, "prioritize"
is widely used, and I don't remember ever hearing "priorize" -- where
did you come across it?
Google flags it as an error,
the Oxford on American usage flags it as a Canadianism.
Perhaps it has fallen southwards?

Jan
b***@shaw.ca
2018-01-17 22:26:35 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of that word
and know that is not the intent of the user, therefore it can create
confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is congruent in meaning
.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by p***@gmail.com
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my
experience. Just saying.
I find them both nasty and wouldn't use either. However, "prioritize"
is widely used, and I don't remember ever hearing "priorize" -- where
did you come across it?
Google flags it as an error,
the Oxford on American usage flags it as a Canadianism.
Perhaps it has fallen southwards?
The Oxford Canadian Dictionary lists prioritize, and has no entry
for priorize.

bill
J. J. Lodder
2018-01-18 12:10:20 UTC
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Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of that word
and know that is not the intent of the user, therefore it can create
confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is congruent in meaning
.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by p***@gmail.com
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my
experience. Just saying.
I find them both nasty and wouldn't use either. However, "prioritize"
is widely used, and I don't remember ever hearing "priorize" -- where
did you come across it?
Google flags it as an error,
the Oxford on American usage flags it as a Canadianism.
Perhaps it has fallen southwards?
The Oxford Canadian Dictionary lists prioritize, and has no entry
for priorize.
Saw it in
<https://books.google.nl/books?id=z_VmtjAU01YC&pg=PA269&lpg=PA269&dq=pri
orize+canadianism+oxford&source=bl&ots=6IaO6j1_A3&sig=bYHUDQBoAKP4RYu5F9
vyUuSp-dc&hl=nl&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwjesPnts-HYAhWMPFAKHUA7AscQ6AEIITAC#v=one
page&q=priorize%20canadianism%20oxford&f=false>

Jan

Don Phillipson
2017-04-19 21:39:38 UTC
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Post by p***@gmail.com
BTW, it is the governmental managers that tend to use PRIORIZE in my
experience.
Probably so. The only people who need PRIORIZE are those who cannot
remember the verb RANK -- and democratic governments deliberately
avoid RANK because they know people dislike the suggestion insiders
rank higher than outsiders.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Quinn C
2017-04-19 22:01:04 UTC
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Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of
that word and know that is not the intent of the user,
therefore it can create confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is
congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is
lazy.
If to prioritize means establishing priority, then to priorize
means establishing a priory. It's only logical.
--
Who would know aught of art must learn and then take his ease.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-04-20 06:14:04 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of
that word and know that is not the intent of the user,
therefore it can create confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is
congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
If to prioritize means establishing priority, then to priorize
means establishing a priory. It's only logical.
Yes, but logic isn't much of a guide to meaning.
--
athel
Quinn C
2017-04-20 16:12:37 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Quinn C
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of
that word and know that is not the intent of the user,
therefore it can create confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is
congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
If to prioritize means establishing priority, then to priorize
means establishing a priory. It's only logical.
Yes, but logic isn't much of a guide to meaning.
Cor blimey!
--
The nice thing about standards is that you have so many to choose
from; furthermore, if you do not like any of them, you can just
wait for next year's model.
Andrew Tanenbaum, _Computer Networks_ (1981), p. 168.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-04-20 16:27:23 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Quinn C
Post by p***@gmail.com
When people use PRIORIZE, I think of PRIOR, being the root of
that word and know that is not the intent of the user,
therefore it can create confusion.
PRIORITIZE has the root PRIORITY within the word and is
congruent in meaning.
I do not think it is bafflegab. I think the use of Priorize is lazy.
If to prioritize means establishing priority, then to priorize
means establishing a priory. It's only logical.
Yes, but logic isn't much of a guide to meaning.
Cor blimey!
You don't believe it? Maybe not, as you're German. My first wife worked
in a language school, of which most of the clients were German or
Spanish businessmen. The Germans were constantly complaining that
various characteristics of English were not logical.
--
athel
m***@gmail.com
2018-01-16 18:42:55 UTC
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Actually, if you go way back in time, or at least back to when I was in Grade School in the 1960's, there was no such word as PRIORITIZE. If a student used that word the teacher would respond stating "There is no such word as PRIORITIZE. You can either set your PRIORITIES or you can PRIORIZE what you are going to do. But you cannot use the word PRIORITIZE, it is not a word." At that time you would not find the word PRIORITIZE in the dictionary, you would find the word PRIORIZE. However, as we know English is a fluid language, and over time this common mistake that we as children frequently made got accepted and the word priorize not only fell out of favour, it fell out of the dictionary.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-01-16 21:50:36 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Actually, if you go way back in time, or at least back to when I was in Grade School in the 1960's, there was no such word as PRIORITIZE. If a student used that word the teacher would respond stating "There is no such word as PRIORITIZE. You can either set your PRIORITIES or you can PRIORIZE what you are going to do. But you cannot use the word PRIORITIZE, it is not a word." At that time you would not find the word PRIORITIZE in the dictionary, you would find the word PRIORIZE. However, as we know English is a fluid language, and over time this common mistake that we as children frequently made got accepted and the word priorize not only fell out of favour, it fell out of the dictionary.
You had a teacher who wasn't keeping up with the times, then.
OED citations begin with the Reno Evening Gazette in 1954 in
an article noting how the word was firmly established amongst
government workers.
Don P
2018-01-16 23:53:27 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
. . . If a student used that word the teacher would respond stating "There is no such word as PRIORITIZE. You can either set your PRIORITIES or you can PRIORIZE what you are going to do. But you cannot use the word PRIORITIZE, it is not a word." At that time you would not find the word PRIORITIZE in the dictionary, you would find the word PRIORIZE. . . .
You had a teacher who wasn't keeping up with the times, then.
OED citations begin with the Reno Evening Gazette in 1954 in
an article noting how the word was firmly established amongst
government workers.
This seems twice appropriate.
(1) All government workers are notoriously vulnerable to
technical-sounding jargon. (The theory of good public administration
includes the assumption that "science" is always correct and
personalities do not count -- as if none of us had ever seen the
difference between a good and a bad team captain, chairlady, manager,
etc.)
(2) "Prioritize" (verb) means rank -- but most Americans dislike the
word rank because of its hint that one man can be better than another
man. For whatever reasons, other cultures see no such implications in
ranking (ranger in French), thus do not need the word prioritize.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-01-17 00:45:18 UTC
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Post by Don P
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
. . . If a student used that word the teacher would respond stating "There is no such word as PRIORITIZE. You can either set your PRIORITIES or you can PRIORIZE what you are going to do. But you cannot use the word PRIORITIZE, it is not a word." At that time you would not find the word PRIORITIZE in the dictionary, you would
find the word PRIORIZE. . . .
Post by Don P
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
You had a teacher who wasn't keeping up with the times, then.
OED citations begin with the Reno Evening Gazette in 1954 in
an article noting how the word was firmly established amongst
government workers.
This seems twice appropriate.
(1) All government workers are notoriously vulnerable to
technical-sounding jargon. (The theory of good public administration
includes the assumption that "science" is always correct and
personalities do not count -- as if none of us had ever seen the
difference between a good and a bad team captain, chairlady, manager,
etc.)
(2) "Prioritize" (verb) means rank -- but most Americans dislike the
word rank because of its hint that one man can be better than another
man. For whatever reasons, other cultures see no such implications in
ranking (ranger in French), thus do not need the word prioritize.
In my experience "prioritize" is used in BrE to refer to assigning
relative importance to tasks, targets, etc, rather than to ranking
people by their importance.

As here:
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/prioritize

1 Designate or treat (something) as being very or most important.
‘the department has failed to prioritize safety within the oil
industry’

1.1 Determine the order for dealing with (a series of items or
tasks) according to their relative importance.
‘age affects the way people prioritize their goals’
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
David Kleinecke
2018-01-17 02:06:45 UTC
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Post by Don P
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
. . . If a student used that word the teacher would respond stating "There is no such word as PRIORITIZE. You can either set your PRIORITIES or you can PRIORIZE what you are going to do. But you cannot use the word PRIORITIZE, it is not a word." At that time you would not find the word PRIORITIZE in the dictionary, you would
find the word PRIORIZE. . . .
Post by Don P
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
You had a teacher who wasn't keeping up with the times, then.
OED citations begin with the Reno Evening Gazette in 1954 in
an article noting how the word was firmly established amongst
government workers.
This seems twice appropriate.
(1) All government workers are notoriously vulnerable to
technical-sounding jargon. (The theory of good public administration
includes the assumption that "science" is always correct and
personalities do not count -- as if none of us had ever seen the
difference between a good and a bad team captain, chairlady, manager,
etc.)
(2) "Prioritize" (verb) means rank -- but most Americans dislike the
word rank because of its hint that one man can be better than another
man. For whatever reasons, other cultures see no such implications in
ranking (ranger in French), thus do not need the word prioritize.
In my experience "prioritize" is used in BrE to refer to assigning
relative importance to tasks, targets, etc, rather than to ranking
people by their importance.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/prioritize
1 Designate or treat (something) as being very or most important.
‘the department has failed to prioritize safety within the oil
industry’
1.1 Determine the order for dealing with (a series of items or
tasks) according to their relative importance.
‘age affects the way people prioritize their goals’
IMO "prioritize" means "assign priority" and relates to "prior"
only through the etymology of "priority".

Once upon a time assigning priorities meant arranging things in
the order in which they should be done. As a corollary if a worker
were somehow blocked from doing their first priority task they
should work on their second and if the second were also blocked
the third, etc.

Then came the notion - silly but widely used - of multiple
first priorities. Now the "first" have been drop and nothing
remains of "priority" except "important task".

The original idea of "priority" is a useful concept and I
hope the later deplorable developments will wither and vanish.
s***@gmail.com
2018-01-17 02:28:16 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Don P
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
. . . If a student used that word the teacher would respond stating "There is no such word as PRIORITIZE. You can either set your PRIORITIES or you can PRIORIZE what you are going to do. But you cannot use the word PRIORITIZE, it is not a word." At that time you would not find the word PRIORITIZE in the dictionary, you would
find the word PRIORIZE. . . .
Post by Don P
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
You had a teacher who wasn't keeping up with the times, then.
OED citations begin with the Reno Evening Gazette in 1954 in
an article noting how the word was firmly established amongst
government workers.
This seems twice appropriate.
(1) All government workers are notoriously vulnerable to
technical-sounding jargon. (The theory of good public administration
includes the assumption that "science" is always correct and
personalities do not count -- as if none of us had ever seen the
difference between a good and a bad team captain, chairlady, manager,
etc.)
(2) "Prioritize" (verb) means rank -- but most Americans dislike the
word rank because of its hint that one man can be better than another
man. For whatever reasons, other cultures see no such implications in
ranking (ranger in French), thus do not need the word prioritize.
In my experience "prioritize" is used in BrE to refer to assigning
relative importance to tasks, targets, etc, rather than to ranking
people by their importance.
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/prioritize
1 Designate or treat (something) as being very or most important.
‘the department has failed to prioritize safety within the oil
industry’
1.1 Determine the order for dealing with (a series of items or
tasks) according to their relative importance.
‘age affects the way people prioritize their goals’
IMO "prioritize" means "assign priority" and relates to "prior"
only through the etymology of "priority".
Once upon a time assigning priorities meant arranging things in
the order in which they should be done. As a corollary if a worker
were somehow blocked from doing their first priority task they
should work on their second and if the second were also blocked
the third, etc.
Then came the notion - silly but widely used - of multiple
first priorities. Now the "first" have been drop and nothing
remains of "priority" except "important task".
The original idea of "priority" is a useful concept and I
hope the later deplorable developments will wither and vanish.
Only after a new term appears to capture the old concept.
Maybe "timelying".

/dps
Peter T. Daniels
2018-01-17 04:24:44 UTC
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Post by Don P
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
. . . If a student used that word the teacher would respond stating "There is no such word as PRIORITIZE. You can either set your PRIORITIES or you can PRIORIZE what you are going to do. But you cannot use the word PRIORITIZE, it is not a word." At that time you would not find the word PRIORITIZE in the dictionary, you would find the word PRIORIZE. . . .
You had a teacher who wasn't keeping up with the times, then.
OED citations begin with the Reno Evening Gazette in 1954 in
an article noting how the word was firmly established amongst
government workers.
This seems twice appropriate.
(1) All government workers are notoriously vulnerable to
technical-sounding jargon. (The theory of good public administration
includes the assumption that "science" is always correct and
personalities do not count
You've clearly never met the Republican Party.
Post by Don P
-- as if none of us had ever seen the
difference between a good and a bad team captain, chairlady, manager,
etc.)
(2) "Prioritize" (verb) means rank -- but most Americans dislike the
word rank because of its hint that one man can be better than another
man. For whatever reasons, other cultures see no such implications in
ranking (ranger in French), thus do not need the word prioritize.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-01-17 17:20:28 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by m***@gmail.com
Actually, if you go way back in time, or at least back to when I was in Grade School in the 1960's, there was no such word as PRIORITIZE. If a student used that word the teacher would respond stating "There is no such word as PRIORITIZE. You can either set your PRIORITIES or you can PRIORIZE what you are going to do. But you cannot use the word PRIORITIZE, it is not a word." At that time you would not find the word PRIORITIZE in the dictionary, you would find the word PRIORIZE. However, as we know English is a fluid language, and over time this common mistake that we as children frequently made got accepted and the word priorize not only fell out of favour, it fell out of the dictionary.
You had a teacher who wasn't keeping up with the times, then.
OED citations begin with the Reno Evening Gazette in 1954 in
an article noting how the word was firmly established amongst
government workers.
Does it suggest when "priorize" went out of use? If I were to see that word somewhere, I'd
take it to mean either 'organize a monastery as a priory' or 'make someone a prior, i.e. the
head of a priory'.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-01-17 19:01:44 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by m***@gmail.com
Actually, if you go way back in time, or at least back to when I was in Grade School in the 1960's, there was no such word as PRIORITIZE. If a student used that word the teacher would respond stating "There is no such word as PRIORITIZE. You can either set your PRIORITIES or you can PRIORIZE what you are going to do. But you cannot use the word PRIORITIZE, it is not a word." At that time you would not find the word PRIORITIZE in the dictionary, you would find the word PRIORIZE. However, as we know English is a fluid language, and over time this common mistake that we as children frequently made got accepted and the word priorize not only fell out of favour, it fell out of the dictionary.
You had a teacher who wasn't keeping up with the times, then.
OED citations begin with the Reno Evening Gazette in 1954 in
an article noting how the word was firmly established amongst
government workers.
Does it suggest when "priorize" went out of use? If I were to see that word somewhere, I'd
take it to mean either 'organize a monastery as a priory' or 'make someone a prior, i.e. the
head of a priory'.
On the face of it, it looks like 'priorize' never really gained currency
at all despite the insistence of the aforementioned teacher. OED has
no entry and does not mention it in the entry for 'prioritize'.
Moreover onelook.com produces zero results from its range of
dictionaries. It seems more than possible in fact that priorize was not
after all prior to prioritize but that it is a later shortening or
misremembering.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-01-17 19:25:29 UTC
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On Wed, 17 Jan 2018 11:01:44 -0800 (PST), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by m***@gmail.com
Actually, if you go way back in time, or at least back to when I was in Grade School in the 1960's, there was no such word as PRIORITIZE. If a student used that word the teacher would respond stating "There is no such word as PRIORITIZE. You can either set your PRIORITIES or you can PRIORIZE what you are going to do. But you cannot use the word PRIORITIZE, it is not a word." At that time you would not find the word PRIORITIZE in the dictionary, you would find the word PRIORIZE. However, as we know English is a fluid language, and over time this common mistake that we as children frequently made got accepted and the word priorize not only fell out of favour, it fell out of the dictionary.
You had a teacher who wasn't keeping up with the times, then.
OED citations begin with the Reno Evening Gazette in 1954 in
an article noting how the word was firmly established amongst
government workers.
Does it suggest when "priorize" went out of use? If I were to see that word somewhere, I'd
take it to mean either 'organize a monastery as a priory' or 'make someone a prior, i.e. the
head of a priory'.
On the face of it, it looks like 'priorize' never really gained currency
at all despite the insistence of the aforementioned teacher. OED has
no entry and does not mention it in the entry for 'prioritize'.
Moreover onelook.com produces zero results from its range of
dictionaries. It seems more than possible in fact that priorize was not
after all prior to prioritize but that it is a later shortening or
misremembering.
The OED has this in entry for the prefix "de-":

de'priorize v.
1860 A. De Morgan Let. 18 Dec. in R. P. Graves Life Sir W. R.
Hamilton (1889) III. 562 You cannot give him, or let him take,
any licence which can damage or de-priorise anything you choose to
write on your own subject.

In that, "de-priorise" seems to mean reduce in importance or esteem.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Jerry Friedman
2018-01-18 00:23:31 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Wed, 17 Jan 2018 11:01:44 -0800 (PST), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by m***@gmail.com
Actually, if you go way back in time, or at least back to when I was in Grade School in the 1960's, there was no such word as PRIORITIZE. If a student used that word the teacher would respond stating "There is no such word as PRIORITIZE. You can either set your PRIORITIES or you can PRIORIZE what you are going to do. But you cannot use the word PRIORITIZE, it is not a word." At that time you would not find the word PRIORITIZE in the dictionary, you would find the word PRIORIZE. However, as we know English is a fluid language, and over time this common mistake that we as children frequently made got accepted and the word priorize not only fell out of favour, it fell out of the dictionary.
You had a teacher who wasn't keeping up with the times, then.
OED citations begin with the Reno Evening Gazette in 1954 in
an article noting how the word was firmly established amongst
government workers.
Does it suggest when "priorize" went out of use? If I were to see that word somewhere, I'd
take it to mean either 'organize a monastery as a priory' or 'make someone a prior, i.e. the
head of a priory'.
On the face of it, it looks like 'priorize' never really gained currency
at all despite the insistence of the aforementioned teacher. OED has
no entry and does not mention it in the entry for 'prioritize'.
Moreover onelook.com produces zero results from its range of
dictionaries. It seems more than possible in fact that priorize was not
after all prior to prioritize but that it is a later shortening or
misremembering.
de'priorize v.
1860 A. De Morgan Let. 18 Dec. in R. P. Graves Life Sir W. R.
Hamilton (1889) III. 562 You cannot give him, or let him take,
any licence which can damage or de-priorise anything you choose to
write on your own subject.
In that, "de-priorise" seems to mean reduce in importance or esteem.
I think it might literally mean reduce or remove the priority of.
De Morgan is warning Hamilton or whoever not to let some guy claim
priority for anything Hamilton is planning to write.
--
Jerry Friedman
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