Discussion:
Ambiguity
(too old to reply)
David Kleinecke
2018-07-09 19:47:25 UTC
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The caption writer on the Lost Coast Outlook hit it big
this morning:

Humboldt District Attorney's Office Seeking Two Women
with Outstanding Warrants
Mark Brader
2018-07-09 19:53:37 UTC
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David Kleinecke:
> The caption writer on the Lost Coast Outlook hit it big
> this morning:
>
> Humboldt District Attorney's Office Seeking Two Women
> with Outstanding Warrants

I think you're making a distinction without a difference. The DA's
office has physical possession of the warrants, so they are "with"
the warrants in one sense; but if a warrant exists to arrest someone,
the person is described as a person "with a warrant (on them)", so
"with" also works in that reading.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Normal caution suffices. In almost 70 years here,
***@vex.net | I have not been killed even once." --Peter Moylan

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Garrett Wollman
2018-07-09 21:11:01 UTC
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In article <g5WdnVEORezcIN7GnZ2dnUU7-***@giganews.com>,
Mark Brader <***@vex.net> wrote:
>David Kleinecke:
>> The caption writer on the Lost Coast Outlook hit it big
>> this morning:
>>
>> Humboldt District Attorney's Office Seeking Two Women
>> with Outstanding Warrants
>
>I think you're making a distinction without a difference. The DA's
>office has physical possession of the warrants, so they are "with"
>the warrants in one sense; but if a warrant exists to arrest someone,
>the person is described as a person "with a warrant (on them)", so
>"with" also works in that reading.

In old-style Headlinese, where space is at a premium, you might have
seen instead:

HED: Women Sought by Humboldt DA
DEK: Warrants outstanding for both on charges of [crime]

But that style of headline is "not SEO-friendly" as they say, so
nowadays headlines are less compressed.

-GAWollman

--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Quinn C
2018-07-09 22:57:49 UTC
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* Mark Brader:

> David Kleinecke:
>> The caption writer on the Lost Coast Outlook hit it big
>> this morning:
>>
>> Humboldt District Attorney's Office Seeking Two Women
>> with Outstanding Warrants
>
> I think you're making a distinction without a difference. The DA's
> office has physical possession of the warrants, so they are "with"
> the warrants in one sense; but if a warrant exists to arrest someone,
> the person is described as a person "with a warrant (on them)", so
> "with" also works in that reading.

The two readings I see are that
- they are looking for two specific women
- any two women with outstanding warrants will do

It being the DA in practice disambiguates for the former. If it was an
investigative journalist's request, both make sense.

--
Ice hockey is a form of disorderly conduct
in which the score is kept.
-- Doug Larson
David Kleinecke
2018-07-09 23:06:15 UTC
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On Monday, July 9, 2018 at 3:57:51 PM UTC-7, Quinn C wrote:
> * Mark Brader:
>
> > David Kleinecke:
> >> The caption writer on the Lost Coast Outlook hit it big
> >> this morning:
> >>
> >> Humboldt District Attorney's Office Seeking Two Women
> >> with Outstanding Warrants
> >
> > I think you're making a distinction without a difference. The DA's
> > office has physical possession of the warrants, so they are "with"
> > the warrants in one sense; but if a warrant exists to arrest someone,
> > the person is described as a person "with a warrant (on them)", so
> > "with" also works in that reading.
>
> The two readings I see are that
> - they are looking for two specific women
> - any two women with outstanding warrants will do
>
> It being the DA in practice disambiguates for the former. If it was an
> investigative journalist's request, both make sense.

Perhaps a man must have a dirty mind to imagine "warrant"
is a euphemism.

PS: A hit-amd-run and a thief.
Mark Brader
2018-07-10 06:20:42 UTC
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Oliver Cromm:
> The two readings I see are that
> - they are looking for two specific women
> - any two women with outstanding warrants will do

Ah, good point.
--
Mark Brader "God help us if [the Nazis]'d won;
Toronto I cannot imagine their sitcoms."
***@vex.net --James Lileks
Paul Wolff
2018-07-10 13:18:08 UTC
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On Mon, 9 Jul 2018, David Kleinecke <***@gmail.com> posted:
>The caption writer on the Lost Coast Outlook hit it big
>this morning:
>
> Humboldt District Attorney's Office Seeking Two Women
> with Outstanding Warrants

A Financial Times article headline yesterday:
"Big Four paid millions to advise Brussels on tax policy"

"Big four" are the largest accountancy firms, "Brussels" is the European
Commission. I couldn't see why the accountants would pay millions to
advise the Commission on tax policy, until I linked to the body of the
article and read the awful truth.
--
Paul
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-10 14:18:07 UTC
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On Tuesday, July 10, 2018 at 9:23:21 AM UTC-4, Paul Wolff wrote:

> A Financial Times article headline yesterday:
> "Big Four paid millions to advise Brussels on tax policy"
>
> "Big four" are the largest accountancy firms, "Brussels" is the European
> Commission. I couldn't see why the accountants would pay millions to
> advise the Commission on tax policy, until I linked to the body of the
> article and read the awful truth.

Passives Often Found In Headlines
Paul Wolff
2018-07-10 20:32:50 UTC
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On Tue, 10 Jul 2018, Peter T. Daniels <***@verizon.net> posted:
>On Tuesday, July 10, 2018 at 9:23:21 AM UTC-4, Paul Wolff wrote:
>
>> A Financial Times article headline yesterday:
>> "Big Four paid millions to advise Brussels on tax policy"
>>
>> "Big four" are the largest accountancy firms, "Brussels" is the European
>> Commission. I couldn't see why the accountants would pay millions to
>> advise the Commission on tax policy, until I linked to the body of the
>> article and read the awful truth.
>
>Passives Often Found In Headlines

But they aren't the first choice of a reader.
--
Paul
Quinn C
2018-07-10 22:22:54 UTC
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* Paul Wolff:

> On Tue, 10 Jul 2018, Peter T. Daniels <***@verizon.net> posted:
>>On Tuesday, July 10, 2018 at 9:23:21 AM UTC-4, Paul Wolff wrote:
>>
>>> A Financial Times article headline yesterday:
>>> "Big Four paid millions to advise Brussels on tax policy"
>>>
>>> "Big four" are the largest accountancy firms, "Brussels" is the European
>>> Commission. I couldn't see why the accountants would pay millions to
>>> advise the Commission on tax policy, until I linked to the body of the
>>> article and read the awful truth.
>>
>>Passives Often Found In Headlines
>
> But they aren't the first choice of a reader.

I hate to be co-opted like that.

--
We say, 'If any lady or gentleman shall buy this article _____ shall
have it for five dollars.' The blank may be filled with he, she, it,
or they; or in any other manner; and yet the form of the expression
will be too vulgar to be uttered. -- Wkly Jrnl of Commerce (1839)
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