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snail mail?
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Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-13 21:18:01 UTC
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A long and rather unpleasant article in the September 2018 *American Philatelist*
on vermin that can damage mail in transit (a follow-up to one several years ago
that I haven't seen, which dealt with rats and mice and such) has near the
beginning some contemporary examples:

"Two [envelopes] eaten by snails in the mail [Figure 5]. One was sent in
August 1989 from Wales with a bright red official Post Office seal applied in
London stating, 'Eaten By Snails in Letter Box.'* The other [envelope] sent
locally in London shows that the stamp has been completely eaten off with
a 'Repair Duty/Royal Mail Norwich'** postmarked September 1.*** A large red
straight-line**** marking stating 'Damaged By Snails' has been applied. Snail
infestation is most common in the spring and midsummer seasons."

*Handwritten on a label that leaves room for the specific circumstances to be
given.
**The letter is addressed to Norwich..
***The postmark clearly includes 2001.
****The word "rubber-stamp" or similar has been omitted from the text.

Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-09-13 21:33:45 UTC
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On Thursday, 13 September 2018 22:18:04 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> A long and rather unpleasant article in the September 2018 *American Philatelist*
> on vermin that can damage mail in transit (a follow-up to one several years ago
> that I haven't seen, which dealt with rats and mice and such) has near the
> beginning some contemporary examples:
>
> "Two [envelopes] eaten by snails in the mail [Figure 5]. One was sent in
> August 1989 from Wales with a bright red official Post Office seal applied in
> London stating, 'Eaten By Snails in Letter Box.'* The other [envelope] sent
> locally in London shows that the stamp has been completely eaten off with
> a 'Repair Duty/Royal Mail Norwich'** postmarked September 1.*** A large red
> straight-line**** marking stating 'Damaged By Snails' has been applied. Snail
> infestation is most common in the spring and midsummer seasons."
>
> *Handwritten on a label that leaves room for the specific circumstances to be
> given.
> **The letter is addressed to Norwich..
> ***The postmark clearly includes 2001.
> ****The word "rubber-stamp" or similar has been omitted from the text.
>
> Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
> it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?

Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
damp stone wall ..

<http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>

or foliage ...

<https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-13 21:50:43 UTC
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On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 5:33:48 PM UTC-4, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
> On Thursday, 13 September 2018 22:18:04 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:

> > A long and rather unpleasant article in the September 2018 *American Philatelist*
> > on vermin that can damage mail in transit (a follow-up to one several years ago
> > that I haven't seen, which dealt with rats and mice and such) has near the
> > beginning some contemporary examples:
> >
> > "Two [envelopes] eaten by snails in the mail [Figure 5]. One was sent in
> > August 1989 from Wales with a bright red official Post Office seal applied in
> > London stating, 'Eaten By Snails in Letter Box.'* The other [envelope] sent
> > locally in London shows that the stamp has been completely eaten off with
> > a 'Repair Duty/Royal Mail Norwich'** postmarked September 1.*** A large red
> > straight-line**** marking stating 'Damaged By Snails' has been applied. Snail
> > infestation is most common in the spring and midsummer seasons."
> >
> > *Handwritten on a label that leaves room for the specific circumstances to be
> > given.
> > **The letter is addressed to Norwich..
> > ***The postmark clearly includes 2001.
> > ****The word "rubber-stamp" or similar has been omitted from the text.
> >
> > Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
> > it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
>
> Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
> and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
> intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
> fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
> much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
> damp stone wall ..
>
> <http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
>
> or foliage ...
>
> <https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>

I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
Adam Funk
2018-09-14 07:57:05 UTC
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On 2018-09-13, Peter T. Daniels wrote:

> On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 5:33:48 PM UTC-4, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
>> On Thursday, 13 September 2018 22:18:04 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:

>> > Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
>> > it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
>>
>> Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
>> and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
>> intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
>> fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
>> much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
>> damp stone wall ..
>>
>> <http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
>>
>> or foliage ...
>>
>> <https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
>
> I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.

I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
newspaper article from 2001 about it.

"Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"

<https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>


--
I don't quite understand this worship of objectivity in
journalism. Now, just flat-out lying is different from being
subjective. --- Hunter S Thompson
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-14 12:12:07 UTC
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On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 4:00:07 AM UTC-4, Adam Funk wrote:
> On 2018-09-13, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> > On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 5:33:48 PM UTC-4, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
> >> On Thursday, 13 September 2018 22:18:04 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:

> >> > Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
> >> > it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
> >> Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
> >> and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
> >> intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
> >> fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
> >> much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
> >> damp stone wall ..
> >> <http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
> >> or foliage ...
> >> <https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
> > I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
>
> I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
> newspaper article from 2001 about it.
>
> "Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
>
> <https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>

two months after the item in question

"The draught excluder solution has had one drawback, however. Installing
them has cut off a source of income to the Post Office and its parent
company, Consignia. "We used to put the [damaged] envelopes in a plastic
bag and then surcharge the addressee," said Mark Lunnen, the Devon
collections planning manager."

What?? The Royal Mail charged customers for damage to mail that they were
responsible for???
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-09-14 12:27:17 UTC
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On Friday, 14 September 2018 13:12:10 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 4:00:07 AM UTC-4, Adam Funk wrote:
> > On 2018-09-13, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> > > On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 5:33:48 PM UTC-4, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
> > >> On Thursday, 13 September 2018 22:18:04 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>
> > >> > Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
> > >> > it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
> > >> Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
> > >> and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
> > >> intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
> > >> fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
> > >> much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
> > >> damp stone wall ..
> > >> <http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
> > >> or foliage ...
> > >> <https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
> > > I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
> >
> > I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
> > newspaper article from 2001 about it.
> >
> > "Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
> >
> > <https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>
>
> two months after the item in question
>
> "The draught excluder solution has had one drawback, however. Installing
> them has cut off a source of income to the Post Office and its parent
> company, Consignia. "We used to put the [damaged] envelopes in a plastic
> bag and then surcharge the addressee," said Mark Lunnen, the Devon
> collections planning manager."
>
> What?? The Royal Mail charged customers for damage to mail that they were
> responsible for???

But they weren't responsible for it. They didn't own the snails. And had people
observed collection times and not left letters in the box overnight it wouldn't
have happened. It's not a bleedin' charity they're running!
Tony Cooper
2018-09-14 14:38:39 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 05:27:17 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
<***@googlemail.com> wrote:

>On Friday, 14 September 2018 13:12:10 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>> On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 4:00:07 AM UTC-4, Adam Funk wrote:
>> > On 2018-09-13, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>> > > On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 5:33:48 PM UTC-4, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
>> > >> On Thursday, 13 September 2018 22:18:04 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>>
>> > >> > Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
>> > >> > it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
>> > >> Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
>> > >> and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
>> > >> intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
>> > >> fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
>> > >> much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
>> > >> damp stone wall ..
>> > >> <http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
>> > >> or foliage ...
>> > >> <https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
>> > > I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
>> >
>> > I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
>> > newspaper article from 2001 about it.
>> >
>> > "Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
>> >
>> > <https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>
>>
>> two months after the item in question
>>
>> "The draught excluder solution has had one drawback, however. Installing
>> them has cut off a source of income to the Post Office and its parent
>> company, Consignia. "We used to put the [damaged] envelopes in a plastic
>> bag and then surcharge the addressee," said Mark Lunnen, the Devon
>> collections planning manager."
>>
>> What?? The Royal Mail charged customers for damage to mail that they were
>> responsible for???
>
>But they weren't responsible for it. They didn't own the snails. And had people
>observed collection times and not left letters in the box overnight it wouldn't
>have happened. It's not a bleedin' charity they're running!


There's something wrong there. If envelopes were left overnight in
the addressee's mailbox, and snail damage occurred, the postie
wouldn't notice the damage or bag the envelope. It's not logical to
think that he would go through the mail left earlier and check for
damage. He, or she, is certainly not going to carry a rubber stamp
along on his route.

For the envelope to be noticed and bagged, it would have to be prior
to delivery. The snail damage would be either at the sender's end or
in a Royal Mail post box.

The Royal Mail was charging the wrong party, but that's government for
you.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Janet
2018-09-14 15:23:26 UTC
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In article <***@4ax.com>, tonycooper214
@invalid.com says...
> For the envelope to be noticed and bagged, it would have to be prior
> to delivery. The snail damage would be either at the sender's end or
> in a Royal Mail post box.
>
> The Royal Mail was charging the wrong party, but that's government for
> you.


The govt doesn't own Royal Mail.

If a letter has no stamp then the royal mail will invite the
recipient to pay for its transport and delivery.

There's a surcharge for that service. If the recipient declines to pay
up, they won't get the letter.

Janet.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-14 18:14:58 UTC
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On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 10:38:43 AM UTC-4, Tony Cooper wrote:
> On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 05:27:17 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
> <***@googlemail.com> wrote:
>
> >On Friday, 14 September 2018 13:12:10 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> >> On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 4:00:07 AM UTC-4, Adam Funk wrote:
> >> > On 2018-09-13, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> >> > > On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 5:33:48 PM UTC-4, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
> >> > >> On Thursday, 13 September 2018 22:18:04 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> >>
> >> > >> > Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
> >> > >> > it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
> >> > >> Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
> >> > >> and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
> >> > >> intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
> >> > >> fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
> >> > >> much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
> >> > >> damp stone wall ..
> >> > >> <http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
> >> > >> or foliage ...
> >> > >> <https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
> >> > > I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
> >> >
> >> > I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
> >> > newspaper article from 2001 about it.
> >> >
> >> > "Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
> >> >
> >> > <https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>
> >>
> >> two months after the item in question
> >>
> >> "The draught excluder solution has had one drawback, however. Installing
> >> them has cut off a source of income to the Post Office and its parent
> >> company, Consignia. "We used to put the [damaged] envelopes in a plastic
> >> bag and then surcharge the addressee," said Mark Lunnen, the Devon
> >> collections planning manager."
> >>
> >> What?? The Royal Mail charged customers for damage to mail that they were
> >> responsible for???
> >
> >But they weren't responsible for it. They didn't own the snails. And had people
> >observed collection times and not left letters in the box overnight it wouldn't
> >have happened. It's not a bleedin' charity they're running!
>
> There's something wrong there. If envelopes were left overnight in
> the addressee's mailbox, and snail damage occurred, the postie
> wouldn't notice the damage or bag the envelope. It's not logical to
> think that he would go through the mail left earlier and check for
> damage. He, or she, is certainly not going to carry a rubber stamp
> along on his route.

I _hope_ that was intended as a "joke." There is no hint, anywhere, either
in the original story or in Maddie's comment, that the snails were in any
individual's mailbox (which, you might recall, though I suppose you don't,
they don't call a "mailbox" but something involving the slot that the
letters are pushed through to fall either onto the floor or into a
container intended for the purpose). They were in the postboxes in which
letters are deposited for the Royal Mail to pick up on a set schedule,
and Maddie's advice was to only mail letters shortly before the scheduled
pickup time.

> For the envelope to be noticed and bagged, it would have to be prior
> to delivery. The snail damage would be either at the sender's end or
> in a Royal Mail post box.
>
> The Royal Mail was charging the wrong party, but that's government for
> you.
Tak To
2018-09-14 16:31:02 UTC
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On 9/14/2018 8:27 AM, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
> On Friday, 14 September 2018 13:12:10 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>> On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 4:00:07 AM UTC-4, Adam Funk wrote:
>>> On 2018-09-13, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>>>> On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 5:33:48 PM UTC-4, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
>>>>> On Thursday, 13 September 2018 22:18:04 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>>
>>>>>> Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
>>>>>> it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
>>>>> Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
>>>>> and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
>>>>> intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
>>>>> fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
>>>>> much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
>>>>> damp stone wall ..
>>>>> <http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
>>>>> or foliage ...
>>>>> <https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
>>>> I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
>>>
>>> I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
>>> newspaper article from 2001 about it.
>>>
>>> "Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
>>>
>>> <https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>
>>
>> two months after the item in question
>>
>> "The draught excluder solution has had one drawback, however. Installing
>> them has cut off a source of income to the Post Office and its parent
>> company, Consignia. "We used to put the [damaged] envelopes in a plastic
>> bag and then surcharge the addressee," said Mark Lunnen, the Devon
>> collections planning manager."
>>
>> What?? The Royal Mail charged customers for damage to mail that they were
>> responsible for???
>
> But they weren't responsible for it. They didn't own the snails. And had people
> observed collection times and not left letters in the box overnight it wouldn't
> have happened. It's not a bleedin' charity they're running!

They can install collars around the inlet[1]. They can clean
the exterior to get rid of the slime trail so that other
snails would not follow. Etc.

[1] E.g.,
https://www.picclickimg.com/d/l400/pict/222684276227_/Slug-Collars-Pack-of-6-Plant-Protection.jpg

--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Tony Cooper
2018-09-14 14:25:17 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 08:57:05 +0100, Adam Funk <***@ducksburg.com>
wrote:

>On 2018-09-13, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>
>> On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 5:33:48 PM UTC-4, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
>>> On Thursday, 13 September 2018 22:18:04 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>
>>> > Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
>>> > it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
>>>
>>> Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
>>> and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
>>> intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
>>> fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
>>> much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
>>> damp stone wall ..
>>>
>>> <http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
>>>
>>> or foliage ...
>>>
>>> <https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
>>
>> I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
>
>I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
>newspaper article from 2001 about it.
>
>"Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
>
><https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>

So far, no snails have appeared in our mailbox. It's fairly common,
though, for an anole (those small lizard-like creatures that abound in
Florida) to be found in our mailbox. They don't chew on mail, but it
can be quite unsettling to pull out the mail and have one of them jump
out.

Gardeners know about snail and slug infestations, though. Plucking vs
salting is a common discussion point.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Jerry Friedman
2018-09-14 16:42:29 UTC
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On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 8:25:23 AM UTC-6, Tony Cooper wrote:
> On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 08:57:05 +0100, Adam Funk <***@ducksburg.com>
> wrote:
>
> >On 2018-09-13, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> >
> >> On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 5:33:48 PM UTC-4, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
> >>> On Thursday, 13 September 2018 22:18:04 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> >
> >>> > Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
> >>> > it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
> >>>
> >>> Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
> >>> and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
> >>> intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
> >>> fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
> >>> much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
> >>> damp stone wall ..
> >>>
> >>> <http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
> >>>
> >>> or foliage ...
> >>>
> >>> <https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
> >>
> >> I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
> >
> >I hadn't heard of this as a postal problem until now, but here's a
> >newspaper article from 2001 about it.
> >
> >"Lurking inside the postbox: snail mail"
> >
> ><https://www.theguardian.com/uk/2001/nov/10/johnvidal>
>
> So far, no snails have appeared in our mailbox. It's fairly common,
> though, for an anole (those small lizard-like creatures that abound in
> Florida)

They are lizards.

> to be found in our mailbox. They don't chew on mail, but it
> can be quite unsettling to pull out the mail and have one of them jump
> out.
>
> Gardeners know about snail and slug infestations, though. Plucking vs
> salting is a common discussion point.

Beer!

--
Jerry Friedman
occam
2018-09-14 14:35:09 UTC
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On 13/09/2018 23:50, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 5:33:48 PM UTC-4, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:
>> On Thursday, 13 September 2018 22:18:04 UTC+1, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>
>>> A long and rather unpleasant article in the September 2018 *American Philatelist*
>>> on vermin that can damage mail in transit (a follow-up to one several years ago
>>> that I haven't seen, which dealt with rats and mice and such) has near the
>>> beginning some contemporary examples:
>>>
>>> "Two [envelopes] eaten by snails in the mail [Figure 5]. One was sent in
>>> August 1989 from Wales with a bright red official Post Office seal applied in
>>> London stating, 'Eaten By Snails in Letter Box.'* The other [envelope] sent
>>> locally in London shows that the stamp has been completely eaten off with
>>> a 'Repair Duty/Royal Mail Norwich'** postmarked September 1.*** A large red
>>> straight-line**** marking stating 'Damaged By Snails' has been applied. Snail
>>> infestation is most common in the spring and midsummer seasons."
>>>
>>> *Handwritten on a label that leaves room for the specific circumstances to be
>>> given.
>>> **The letter is addressed to Norwich..
>>> ***The postmark clearly includes 2001.
>>> ****The word "rubber-stamp" or similar has been omitted from the text.
>>>
>>> Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
>>> it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
>>
>> Would seem reasonable. They manage to get into my kitchen often enough
>> and that involves a twenty foot climb up the main water pipe followed by an
>> intricate weaving around the back of a cupboard and up the side of my
>> fridge. I have no difficulty in believing that they are frequent visitors to the
>> much more accessible postboxes, esp[ecially when they're set in a nice
>> damp stone wall ..
>>
>> <http://www.freeimageslive.co.uk/files/images002/uk_post_box_P4708.JPG>
>>
>> or foliage ...
>>
>> <https://i.pinimg.com/originals/e0/7f/c2/e07fc213f681fb5840b49089d59530e7.jpg>
>
> I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
>

I bet you have never heard of 'wrong type of snow' either. It is a thing
for British Rail.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_wrong_type_of_snow
Tony Cooper
2018-09-14 15:13:39 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 16:35:09 +0200, occam <***@invalid.nix> wrote:

>I bet you have never heard of 'wrong type of snow' either. It is a thing
>for British Rail.
>
>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_wrong_type_of_snow

I thought it interesting to read in that article that BBC Radio 4
employs (employed?) a news presenter named James Naughtie.

I can imagine a broadcast in which I'd hear: "This Naughtie,
reporting on a British Rail stoppage."

That might give the listener the idea that it was entwined couples,
not snow, on the tracks and the report would provide full details.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-09-14 15:58:52 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 11:13:39 -0400, Tony Cooper
<***@invalid.com> wrote:

>On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 16:35:09 +0200, occam <***@invalid.nix> wrote:
>
>>I bet you have never heard of 'wrong type of snow' either. It is a thing
>>for British Rail.
>>
>>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_wrong_type_of_snow
>
>I thought it interesting to read in that article that BBC Radio 4
>employs (employed?) a news presenter named James Naughtie.
>
>I can imagine a broadcast in which I'd hear: "This Naughtie,
>reporting on a British Rail stoppage."
>
>That might give the listener the idea that it was entwined couples,
>not snow, on the tracks and the report would provide full details.

In a broadcast you might not recognise his name when spoken.
He is Scottish. The "augh" in "Naughtie" rhymes with the "och" in
"Loch".

--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Janet
2018-09-14 16:32:22 UTC
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In article <***@4ax.com>, tonycooper214
@invalid.com says...
>
> On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 16:35:09 +0200, occam <***@invalid.nix> wrote:
>
> >I bet you have never heard of 'wrong type of snow' either. It is a thing
> >for British Rail.
> >
> >https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_wrong_type_of_snow
>
> I thought it interesting to read in that article that BBC Radio 4
> employs (employed?) a news presenter named James Naughtie.

which is not pronounced naughty, so it isn't funny either.

Janet.
>
> I can imagine a broadcast in which I'd hear: "This Naughtie,
> reporting on a British Rail stoppage."
>
> That might give the listener the idea that it was entwined couples,
> not snow, on the tracks and the report would provide full details.
Tony Cooper
2018-09-14 16:58:11 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 11:13:39 -0400, Tony Cooper
<***@invalid.com> wrote:

>On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 16:35:09 +0200, occam <***@invalid.nix> wrote:
>
>>I bet you have never heard of 'wrong type of snow' either. It is a thing
>>for British Rail.
>>
>>https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_wrong_type_of_snow
>
>I thought it interesting to read in that article that BBC Radio 4
>employs (employed?) a news presenter named James Naughtie.
>
>I can imagine a broadcast in which I'd hear: "This Naughtie,
>reporting on a British Rail stoppage."

I don't know what's going on with me. I leave out words and don't
notice. "This *is*..."
>
>That might give the listener the idea that it was entwined couples,
>not snow, on the tracks and the report would provide full details.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Paul Carmichael
2018-09-14 16:43:26 UTC
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On 13/09/18 23:50, Peter T. Daniels wrote:

> I have never heard of snail infestation anywhere before.
>

We have them here in southern Spain.

--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
b***@aol.com
2018-09-13 21:45:58 UTC
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Le jeudi 13 septembre 2018 23:18:04 UTC+2, Peter T. Daniels a écrit :
> A long and rather unpleasant article in the September 2018 *American Philatelist*
> on vermin that can damage mail in transit (a follow-up to one several years ago
> that I haven't seen, which dealt with rats and mice and such) has near the
> beginning some contemporary examples:
>
> "Two [envelopes] eaten by snails in the mail [Figure 5]. One was sent in
> August 1989 from Wales with a bright red official Post Office seal applied in
> London stating, 'Eaten By Snails in Letter Box.'* The other [envelope] sent
> locally in London shows that the stamp has been completely eaten off with
> a 'Repair Duty/Royal Mail Norwich'** postmarked September 1.*** A large red
> straight-line**** marking stating 'Damaged By Snails' has been applied. Snail
> infestation is most common in the spring and midsummer seasons."
>
> *Handwritten on a label that leaves room for the specific circumstances to be
> given.
> **The letter is addressed to Norwich..
> ***The postmark clearly includes 2001.
> ****The word "rubber-stamp" or similar has been omitted from the text.
>
> Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
> it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?

The bottomline is the issue must have been addressed sluggishly.
Richard Tobin
2018-09-13 22:20:21 UTC
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In article <0f7bc600-ea90-4016-9cc5-***@googlegroups.com>,
Peter T. Daniels <***@verizon.net> wrote:

>Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
>it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?

More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
added, like this:

http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg

The image (along with several similar examples) is from this page:

https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835

-- Richard
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-14 02:43:37 UTC
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On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 6:25:03 PM UTC-4, Richard Tobin wrote:
> In article <0f7bc600-ea90-4016-9cc5-***@googlegroups.com>,
> Peter T. Daniels <***@verizon.net> wrote:
>
> >Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
> >it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
>
> More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
> added, like this:
>
> http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
>
> The image (along with several similar examples) is from this page:
>
> https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835

I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...

https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018

The photo of the item is on p. 38.
Adam Funk
2018-09-14 07:58:47 UTC
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On 2018-09-14, Peter T. Daniels wrote:

> On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 6:25:03 PM UTC-4, Richard Tobin wrote:
>> In article <0f7bc600-ea90-4016-9cc5-***@googlegroups.com>,
>> Peter T. Daniels <***@verizon.net> wrote:
>>
>> >Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
>> >it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
>>
>> More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
>> added, like this:
>>
>> http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
>>
>> The image (along with several similar examples) is from this page:
>>
>> https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835
>
> I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
> or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
>
> https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
>
> The photo of the item is on p. 38.

Far out!


--
Java is kind of like kindergarten. There are lots of rules you have to
remember. If you don't follow them, the compiler makes you sit in the
corner until you do. --- Don Raab
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-14 12:07:06 UTC
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On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 4:00:07 AM UTC-4, Adam Funk wrote:
> On 2018-09-14, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> > On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 6:25:03 PM UTC-4, Richard Tobin wrote:
> >> In article <0f7bc600-ea90-4016-9cc5-***@googlegroups.com>,
> >> Peter T. Daniels <***@verizon.net> wrote:

> >> >Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
> >> >it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
> >> More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
> >> added, like this:
> >> http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
> >> The image (along with several similar examples) is from this page:
> >> https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835
> > I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
> > or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
> > https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
> > The photo of the item is on p. 38.
>
> Far out!

Did it, then, let you behind the paywall?
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-09-14 14:17:38 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 05:07:06 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
<***@verizon.net> wrote:

>On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 4:00:07 AM UTC-4, Adam Funk wrote:
>> On 2018-09-14, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>> > On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 6:25:03 PM UTC-4, Richard Tobin wrote:
>> >> In article <0f7bc600-ea90-4016-9cc5-***@googlegroups.com>,
>> >> Peter T. Daniels <***@verizon.net> wrote:
>
>> >> >Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
>> >> >it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
>> >> More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
>> >> added, like this:
>> >> http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
>> >> The image (along with several similar examples) is from this page:
>> >> https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835
>> > I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
>> > or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
>> > https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
>> > The photo of the item is on p. 38.
>>
>> Far out!
>
>Did it, then, let you behind the paywall?

It let me behind the paywall.

--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-09-14 18:10:12 UTC
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On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 10:17:43 AM UTC-4, PeterWD wrote:
> On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 05:07:06 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
> <***@verizon.net> wrote:
>
> >On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 4:00:07 AM UTC-4, Adam Funk wrote:
> >> On 2018-09-14, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> >> > On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 6:25:03 PM UTC-4, Richard Tobin wrote:
> >> >> In article <0f7bc600-ea90-4016-9cc5-***@googlegroups.com>,
> >> >> Peter T. Daniels <***@verizon.net> wrote:
> >
> >> >> >Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
> >> >> >it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
> >> >> More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
> >> >> added, like this:
> >> >> http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
> >> >> The image (along with several similar examples) is from this page:
> >> >> https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835
> >> > I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
> >> > or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
> >> > https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
> >> > The photo of the item is on p. 38.
> >>
> >> Far out!
> >
> >Did it, then, let you behind the paywall?
>
> It let me behind the paywall.

Only members, then, need to sign in to access it -- so long as anyone else
knows the url. (Which doesn't incorporate the APS's url, stamps.org)
Tony Cooper
2018-09-14 14:29:45 UTC
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On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 05:07:06 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
<***@verizon.net> wrote:

>On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 4:00:07 AM UTC-4, Adam Funk wrote:
>> On 2018-09-14, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>> > On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 6:25:03 PM UTC-4, Richard Tobin wrote:
>> >> In article <0f7bc600-ea90-4016-9cc5-***@googlegroups.com>,
>> >> Peter T. Daniels <***@verizon.net> wrote:
>
>> >> >Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
>> >> >it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
>> >> More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
>> >> added, like this:
>> >> http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
>> >> The image (along with several similar examples) is from this page:
>> >> https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835
>> > I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
>> > or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
>> > https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
>> > The photo of the item is on p. 38.
>>
>> Far out!
>
>Did it, then, let you behind the paywall?

No problem opening it and going through pages here. No paywall at
all.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Adam Funk
2018-09-14 15:57:04 UTC
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On 2018-09-14, Tony Cooper wrote:

> On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 05:07:06 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
><***@verizon.net> wrote:
>
>>On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 4:00:07 AM UTC-4, Adam Funk wrote:
>>> On 2018-09-14, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>>> > On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 6:25:03 PM UTC-4, Richard Tobin wrote:
>>> >> In article <0f7bc600-ea90-4016-9cc5-***@googlegroups.com>,
>>> >> Peter T. Daniels <***@verizon.net> wrote:
>>
>>> >> >Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
>>> >> >it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
>>> >> More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
>>> >> added, like this:
>>> >> http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
>>> >> The image (along with several similar examples) is from this page:
>>> >> https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835
>>> > I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
>>> > or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
>>> > https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
>>> > The photo of the item is on p. 38.
>>>
>>> Far out!
>>
>>Did it, then, let you behind the paywall?
>
> No problem opening it and going through pages here. No paywall at
> all.

Same here.


--
I have a natural revulsion to any operating system that shows so
little planning as to have to named all of its commands after
digestive noises (awk, grep, fsck, nroff).
_The UNIX-HATERS Handbook_
soup
2018-09-14 19:03:42 UTC
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On 14/09/2018 15:29, Tony Cooper wrote:
> On Fri, 14 Sep 2018 05:07:06 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
> <***@verizon.net> wrote:
>
>> On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 4:00:07 AM UTC-4, Adam Funk wrote:
>>> On 2018-09-14, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>>>> On Thursday, September 13, 2018 at 6:25:03 PM UTC-4, Richard Tobin wrote:
>>>>> In article <0f7bc600-ea90-4016-9cc5-***@googlegroups.com>,
>>>>> Peter T. Daniels <***@verizon.net> wrote:
>>
>>>>>> Really?? Are cartavorous, or chartiphagous, gastropods really so common that
>>>>>> it made sense to have a rubber-stamp made up to cover the exigency?
>>>>> More likely it is a more generic rubber stamp with "by snails"
>>>>> added, like this:
>>>>> http://www.stampboards.com/images/maturin1/STAMPS%20AFTER%209-6-10/SNAILLABELJPEG7-18-13_zps39b2c704.jpg
>>>>> The image (along with several similar examples) is from this page:
>>>>> https://www.stampboards.com/viewtopic.php?f=13&t=46835
>>>> I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
>>>> or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
>>>> https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
>>>> The photo of the item is on p. 38.
>>>
>>> Far out!
>>
>> Did it, then, let you behind the paywall?
>
> No problem opening it and going through pages here. No paywall at
> all.

+1
Tak To
2018-09-14 16:38:23 UTC
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On 9/14/2018 8:07 AM, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> On Friday, September 14, 2018 at 4:00:07 AM UTC-4, Adam Funk wrote:
>> On 2018-09-14, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>>> [...]
>>> I don't know whether the AmPhilSoc web site is accessible to non-members,
>>> or whether they put up the entire contents of the magazine, but I'll try...
>>> https://www.yumpu.com/en/document/fullscreen/61916178/the-american-philatelist-september-2018
>>> The photo of the item is on p. 38.
>>
>> Far out!

+1

> Did it, then, let you behind the paywall?

Yes.

--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
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