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blew up the tire
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a***@gmail.com
2018-08-08 08:43:09 UTC
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1) I blew the tire up.
2) I blew up the tire.

Aren't those sentences ambiguous, and doesn't the ambiguity ever cause confusion?

I am into grammatical ambiguity, and this ambiguity is semantic but not
grammatical. However, I find it strange that I had never noticed it until now!


In this case, I use the word 'inflate' if I don't mean 'explode'. But
I should have noticed the ambiguity.

Gratefully,
Navi
John Dunlop
2018-08-08 10:10:08 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I blew the tire up.
2) I blew up the tire.
Aren't those sentences ambiguous, and doesn't the ambiguity ever
cause confusion?
Ambiguous in isolation, but context usually resolves it.
--
John
HVS
2018-08-08 22:45:36 UTC
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On Wed, 8 Aug 2018 11:10:08 +0100, John Dunlop
Post by John Dunlop
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I blew the tire up.
2) I blew up the tire.
Aren't those sentences ambiguous, and doesn't the ambiguity ever
cause confusion?
Ambiguous in isolation, but context usually resolves it.
Lowering the tone, I'm disappointed that no-one's mentioned "I blew a
seal"......
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-08-08 22:54:13 UTC
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Post by HVS
On Wed, 8 Aug 2018 11:10:08 +0100, John Dunlop
Post by John Dunlop
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I blew the tire up.
2) I blew up the tire.
Aren't those sentences ambiguous, and doesn't the ambiguity ever
cause confusion?
Ambiguous in isolation, but context usually resolves it.
Lowering the tone, I'm disappointed that no-one's mentioned "I blew a
seal"......
Probably because over here it's called a gasket!
Peter Moylan
2018-08-08 10:21:36 UTC
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1) I blew the tire up. 2) I blew up the tire.
Aren't those sentences ambiguous, and doesn't the ambiguity ever cause confusion?
The ambiguity is unimportant in practice. Making tyres explode is such a
rare hobby that few people would think that that's what you meant.

Having said that, I'd have to say that the original sentences are
unnatural for another reason. I'm happy to blow up a balloon, but
inflating a car tyre with the power of my lungs is too big an ask. I
would prefer to pump up the tyre.

Grammatically, your two sentences are equally good. The "up" is
separable, in the sense that it is optional whether you put it
immediately after "blew".
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
John Dunlop
2018-08-08 10:35:26 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
1) I blew the tire up. 2) I blew up the tire.
...
Post by Peter Moylan
Having said that, I'd have to say that the original sentences are
unnatural for another reason. I'm happy to blow up a balloon, but
inflating a car tyre with the power of my lungs is too big an ask. I
would prefer to pump up the tyre.
In MyE blowing something up (=inflating) doesn't imply lung-power.
--
John
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-08 12:06:08 UTC
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Post by John Dunlop
Post by Peter Moylan
1) I blew the tire up. 2) I blew up the tire.
...
Post by Peter Moylan
Having said that, I'd have to say that the original sentences are
unnatural for another reason. I'm happy to blow up a balloon, but
inflating a car tyre with the power of my lungs is too big an ask. I
would prefer to pump up the tyre.
In MyE blowing something up (=inflating) doesn't imply lung-power.
Over Here, inflating a tire is not blowing it up. Blowing it up would only
be exploding it.

And since he asked about a tire and not a tyre, it is obviously American
English that is in question.
John Dunlop
2018-08-08 12:18:39 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Over Here, inflating a tire is not blowing it up. Blowing it up would
only be exploding it.
And since he asked about a tire and not a tyre, it is obviously
American English that is in question.
Then you disagree with the AHD:

blow up
...
2. To fill with air; inflate: blow up a tire.

https://ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=blow
--
John
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-08 12:27:27 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Over Here, inflating a tire is not blowing it up. Blowing it up would
only be exploding it.
And since he asked about a tire and not a tyre, it is obviously
American English that is in question.
blow up
...
2. To fill with air; inflate: blow up a tire.
https://ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=blow
I often disagree with AHD and prefer to use it only for the etymologies.
John Varela
2018-08-08 23:31:22 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Over Here, inflating a tire is not blowing it up. Blowing it up would
only be exploding it.
And since he asked about a tire and not a tyre, it is obviously
American English that is in question.
blow up
...
2. To fill with air; inflate: blow up a tire.
https://ahdictionary.com/word/search.html?q=blow
It seems that PTD and I agree on something. We both disagree with
AHD. We both do agree with Merriam-Webster, which omits the
"inflate" definition. The Random House unabridged allows the
"inflate" definition only for balls and balloons.
--
John Varela
a***@gmail.com
2018-08-08 17:54:07 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by John Dunlop
Post by Peter Moylan
1) I blew the tire up. 2) I blew up the tire.
...
Post by Peter Moylan
Having said that, I'd have to say that the original sentences are
unnatural for another reason. I'm happy to blow up a balloon, but
inflating a car tyre with the power of my lungs is too big an ask. I
would prefer to pump up the tyre.
In MyE blowing something up (=inflating) doesn't imply lung-power.
Over Here, inflating a tire is not blowing it up. Blowing it up would only
be exploding it.
And since he asked about a tire and not a tyre, it is obviously American
English that is in question.
Thank you all very much,

Thanks to Peter it's clear why I don't use 'blow up' in that context. I
didn't know that! My English is neither clearly American nor clearly British,
but is somewhere in the middle (with a foreign accent and some mistakes
thrown into the bargain). But in this case, it seems that I do things
the American way.


Respectfully,

Navi
John Varela
2018-08-08 23:23:00 UTC
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Post by John Dunlop
Post by Peter Moylan
1) I blew the tire up. 2) I blew up the tire.
...
Post by Peter Moylan
Having said that, I'd have to say that the original sentences are
unnatural for another reason. I'm happy to blow up a balloon, but
inflating a car tyre with the power of my lungs is too big an ask. I
would prefer to pump up the tyre.
In MyE blowing something up (=inflating) doesn't imply lung-power.
I'm with Peter. In MyE "to blow up" in this context means
"explode". Which, incidentally, I understand is a serious concern
when it comes to large aircraft tires.
--
John Varela
RHDraney
2018-08-09 01:52:36 UTC
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Post by John Varela
I'm with Peter. In MyE "to blow up" in this context means
"explode". Which, incidentally, I understand is a serious concern
when it comes to large aircraft tires.
And (I was assured by my late stepfather, in the large-tire business for
decades) the tires on heavy mining equipment


Loading Image...

Trust me, you don't want to be anywhere in the vicinity when one of
those has a blowout....r
Sam Plusnet
2018-08-09 20:55:33 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
I'm with Peter.  In MyE "to blow up" in this context means
"explode".  Which, incidentally, I understand is a serious concern
when it comes to large aircraft tires.
And (I was assured by my late stepfather, in the large-tire business for
decades) the tires on heavy mining equipment
https://i.pinimg.com/736x/b9/f1/85/b9f1856b3b98fe363068c1fd6dce5cae--mining-equipment-heavy-equipment.jpg
Trust me, you don't want to be anywhere in the vicinity when one of
those has a blowout....r
I did wonder if you were thinking of the rotund chap standing by the
wheel, since the other meaning of "a blowout" is a very large meal.
--
Sam Plusnet
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-08-08 10:40:45 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
1) I blew the tire up. 2) I blew up the tire.
Aren't those sentences ambiguous, and doesn't the ambiguity ever cause confusion?
The ambiguity is unimportant in practice. Making tyres explode is such a
rare hobby that few people would think that that's what you meant.
Having said that, I'd have to say that the original sentences are
unnatural for another reason. I'm happy to blow up a balloon, but
inflating a car tyre with the power of my lungs is too big an ask. I
would prefer to pump up the tyre.
Grammatically, your two sentences are equally good. The "up" is
separable, in the sense that it is optional whether you put it
immediately after "blew".
As near as makes no difference it's blowing, just using an artificial
lung. Most balloons are blown up using a gas cylinder these days
anyway. I don't think it's a matter worthy of pedantry.
Harrison Hill
2018-08-08 14:47:39 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter Moylan
1) I blew the tire up. 2) I blew up the tire.
Aren't those sentences ambiguous, and doesn't the ambiguity ever cause confusion?
The ambiguity is unimportant in practice. Making tyres explode is such a
rare hobby that few people would think that that's what you meant.
Having said that, I'd have to say that the original sentences are
unnatural for another reason. I'm happy to blow up a balloon, but
inflating a car tyre with the power of my lungs is too big an ask. I
would prefer to pump up the tyre.
Grammatically, your two sentences are equally good. The "up" is
separable, in the sense that it is optional whether you put it
immediately after "blew".
As near as makes no difference it's blowing, just using an artificial
lung. Most balloons are blown up using a gas cylinder these days
anyway. I don't think it's a matter worthy of pedantry.
Thank you for "worthy of pedantry". Pedants will be rotating in
their graves - counter-rotationally to the earth in which they are
spinning.
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