Discussion:
Sapphire Jubilee
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Peter T. Daniels
2017-02-06 17:19:32 UTC
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One doesn't often get to celebrate the 65th anniversary of anything -- sometimes
one hears of people married that long -- so I wonder whether "sapphire" has
traditionally been established for 65, like silver, gold, and diamond?

Or perhaps the designation was invented in honour of the sapphire jewelry given
to the Princess Elizabeth by her father GVIR as a wedding gift, 70 years ago --
which she wears in the official Jubilee portrait?

(Information from the BBC World Service this morning)
Lothar Frings
2017-02-06 17:27:51 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
One doesn't often get to celebrate the 65th anniversary of anything -- sometimes
one hears of people married that long -- so I wonder whether "sapphire" has
traditionally been established for 65, like silver, gold, and diamond?
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedding_anniversary>

gives "sapphire" for both US and UK. In German
it's just "iron" which probably describes it much besser.
70 should be steel or something.
Harrison Hill
2017-02-06 18:11:32 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Peter T. Daniels
One doesn't often get to celebrate the 65th anniversary of anything -- sometimes
one hears of people married that long -- so I wonder whether "sapphire" has
traditionally been established for 65, like silver, gold, and diamond?
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedding_anniversary>
gives "sapphire" for both US and UK. In German
it's just "iron" which probably describes it much besser.
70 should be steel or something.
Besser or Bessemer?
Lothar Frings
2017-02-06 18:22:36 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Peter T. Daniels
One doesn't often get to celebrate the 65th anniversary of anything -- sometimes
one hears of people married that long -- so I wonder whether "sapphire" has
traditionally been established for 65, like silver, gold, and diamond?
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedding_anniversary>
gives "sapphire" for both US and UK. In German
it's just "iron" which probably describes it much besser.
70 should be steel or something.
Besser or Bessemer?
Sorry... all of the above, I guess.
Whiskers
2017-02-06 18:51:02 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Peter T. Daniels
One doesn't often get to celebrate the 65th anniversary of anything
-- sometimes one hears of people married that long -- so I wonder
whether "sapphire" has traditionally been established for 65, like
silver, gold, and diamond?
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedding_anniversary>
gives "sapphire" for both US and UK. In German it's just "iron" which
probably describes it much besser. 70 should be steel or something.
I think those actually celebrating such anniversaries might appreciate
something a lot softer.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Sam Plusnet
2017-02-06 22:30:34 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Peter T. Daniels
One doesn't often get to celebrate the 65th anniversary of anything
-- sometimes one hears of people married that long -- so I wonder
whether "sapphire" has traditionally been established for 65, like
silver, gold, and diamond?
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedding_anniversary>
gives "sapphire" for both US and UK. In German it's just "iron" which
probably describes it much besser. 70 should be steel or something.
I think those actually celebrating such anniversaries might appreciate
something a lot softer.
It would be a lot cheaper for the husband trying to buy the appropriate
gift for his spouse.

Question: Why is the husband expected to buy presents for his wife on
such occasions, rather than vice versa?
I asked my wife, but she ignored the question.
--
Sam Plusnet
Harvey
2017-02-06 23:59:18 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Question: Why is the husband expected to buy presents for his wife on
such occasions, rather than vice versa?
My wife bought me a plain silver pinky-ring for our 25th. (Granted,
I suggested it when she asked me what to get.)

This year will be anniversary No. 34, so I don't have to think of
appropriate round-number commemorations for a few years.
Post by Sam Plusnet
I asked my wife, but she ignored the question.
:)
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanE (30 years) & BrE (34 years), indiscriminately mixed
GordonD
2017-02-06 19:03:01 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Peter T. Daniels
One doesn't often get to celebrate the 65th anniversary of anything
-- sometimes one hears of people married that long -- so I wonder
whether "sapphire" has traditionally been established for 65, like
silver, gold, and diamond?
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedding_anniversary>
gives "sapphire" for both US and UK. In German it's just "iron" which
probably describes it much besser. 70 should be steel or something.
70 is Platinum. My dad's cousin and her husband celebrated their
platinum anniversary two years ago.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-02-06 20:14:46 UTC
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On Mon, 6 Feb 2017 09:27:51 -0800 (PST), Lothar Frings
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Peter T. Daniels
One doesn't often get to celebrate the 65th anniversary of anything -- sometimes
one hears of people married that long -- so I wonder whether "sapphire" has
traditionally been established for 65, like silver, gold, and diamond?
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedding_anniversary>
gives "sapphire" for both US and UK. In German
it's just "iron" which probably describes it much besser.
"besser"? Is that a typo for "better".

It reminded me of the Bessemer proces which produces steel from iron!
Post by Lothar Frings
70 should be steel or something.
70 is platinum (in the UK).
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Quinn C
2017-02-06 21:47:24 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Mon, 6 Feb 2017 09:27:51 -0800 (PST), Lothar Frings
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Peter T. Daniels
One doesn't often get to celebrate the 65th anniversary of anything -- sometimes
one hears of people married that long -- so I wonder whether "sapphire" has
traditionally been established for 65, like silver, gold, and diamond?
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedding_anniversary>
gives "sapphire" for both US and UK. In German
it's just "iron" which probably describes it much besser.
"besser"? Is that a typo for "better".
It's the German word for "better", and as such probably bester
known to Lothar's fingers.
--
It gets hot in Raleigh, but Texas! I don't know why anybody
lives here, honestly.
-- Robert C. Wilson, Vortex (novel), p.220
Peter T. Daniels
2017-02-06 23:05:29 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Mon, 6 Feb 2017 09:27:51 -0800 (PST), Lothar Frings
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Peter T. Daniels
One doesn't often get to celebrate the 65th anniversary of anything -- sometimes
one hears of people married that long -- so I wonder whether "sapphire" has
traditionally been established for 65, like silver, gold, and diamond?
<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Wedding_anniversary>
gives "sapphire" for both US and UK. In German
it's just "iron" which probably describes it much besser.
"besser"? Is that a typo for "better".
It's the German word for "better", and as such probably bester
known to Lothar's fingers.
I assumed Lothar was making a macaronic joke.
charles
2017-02-06 19:02:24 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
One doesn't often get to celebrate the 65th anniversary of anything --
sometimes one hears of people married that long -- so I wonder whether
"sapphire" has traditionally been established for 65, like silver, gold,
and diamond?
Or perhaps the designation was invented in honour of the sapphire jewelry
given to the Princess Elizabeth by her father GVIR as a wedding gift, 70
years ago -- which she wears in the official Jubilee portrait?
(Information from the BBC World Service this morning)
Wikipedia lists Blue Sapphire for a 65th anniverary gift.

I attended a 70th wedding anniversary party a few years ago - a wartime
wedding. Sadly the wife died a couple of years later.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
LFS
2017-02-07 08:30:06 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
One doesn't often get to celebrate the 65th anniversary of anything -- sometimes
one hears of people married that long -- so I wonder whether "sapphire" has
traditionally been established for 65, like silver, gold, and diamond?
Or perhaps the designation was invented in honour of the sapphire jewelry given
to the Princess Elizabeth by her father GVIR as a wedding gift, 70 years ago --
which she wears in the official Jubilee portrait?
(Information from the BBC World Service this morning)
Well established in the UK. Our local paper quite often carries reports
of couples married that long or longer.

Chuck Berry and his wife celebrated their 68th wedding anniversary not
long ago.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Peter T. Daniels
2017-02-07 15:09:00 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
One doesn't often get to celebrate the 65th anniversary of anything -- sometimes
one hears of people married that long -- so I wonder whether "sapphire" has
traditionally been established for 65, like silver, gold, and diamond?
Or perhaps the designation was invented in honour of the sapphire jewelry given
to the Princess Elizabeth by her father GVIR as a wedding gift, 70 years ago --
which she wears in the official Jubilee portrait?
(Information from the BBC World Service this morning)
Well established in the UK. Our local paper quite often carries reports
of couples married that long or longer.
Because it's highly unusual. Or do Brits in general have life expectancies
like those of Georgians in the long-ago Dannon Yogurt commercials?

(Just last week I saw an explanation for the supposed 130-year-old Georgians:
when the czar's army impressers came round, they would produce the birth
/ baptismal certificates of their fathers to show that they were too old for
military service.)
Post by LFS
Chuck Berry and his wife celebrated their 68th wedding anniversary not
long ago.
And that's news because it's so unusual. Did they have a sapphire anniversary
party three years earlier?
Lothar Frings
2017-02-07 15:22:00 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Well established in the UK. Our local paper quite often carries reports
of couples married that long or longer.
Because it's highly unusual. Or do Brits in general have life expectancies
like those of Georgians in the long-ago Dannon Yogurt commercials?
My theory is that those Caucasians reach
such ages not because of the yogurt but because
they don't know for sure when they were born.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-02-07 15:47:54 UTC
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Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Well established in the UK. Our local paper quite often carries reports
of couples married that long or longer.
Because it's highly unusual. Or do Brits in general have life expectancies
like those of Georgians in the long-ago Dannon Yogurt commercials?
My theory is that those Caucasians reach
such ages not because of the yogurt but because
they don't know for sure when they were born.
Do you reject the theory that you deleted?
Lothar Frings
2017-02-07 16:05:37 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Lothar Frings
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Well established in the UK. Our local paper quite often carries reports
of couples married that long or longer.
Because it's highly unusual. Or do Brits in general have life expectancies
like those of Georgians in the long-ago Dannon Yogurt commercials?
My theory is that those Caucasians reach
such ages not because of the yogurt but because
they don't know for sure when they were born.
Do you reject the theory that you deleted?
-v please
LFS
2017-02-07 15:53:34 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
One doesn't often get to celebrate the 65th anniversary of anything -- sometimes
one hears of people married that long -- so I wonder whether "sapphire" has
traditionally been established for 65, like silver, gold, and diamond?
Or perhaps the designation was invented in honour of the sapphire jewelry given
to the Princess Elizabeth by her father GVIR as a wedding gift, 70 years ago --
which she wears in the official Jubilee portrait?
(Information from the BBC World Service this morning)
Well established in the UK. Our local paper quite often carries reports
of couples married that long or longer.
Because it's highly unusual.
Do beware of thinking that correlation implies causation. That may not
be the only reason for the reports. The people involved are usually
people who have contributed significantly to the local community.

Or do Brits in general have life expectancies
Post by Peter T. Daniels
like those of Georgians in the long-ago Dannon Yogurt commercials?
when the czar's army impressers came round, they would produce the birth
/ baptismal certificates of their fathers to show that they were too old for
military service.)
Post by LFS
Chuck Berry and his wife celebrated their 68th wedding anniversary not
long ago.
And that's news because it's so unusual.
And because it's Chuck Berry who is relatively famous.

Did they have a sapphire anniversary
Post by Peter T. Daniels
party three years earlier?
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
RH Draney
2017-02-07 15:56:45 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Chuck Berry and his wife celebrated their 68th wedding anniversary not
long ago.
And that's news because it's so unusual. Did they have a sapphire anniversary
party three years earlier?
I seriously doubt it...African-American women have been known to
complain that "Sapphire" is a racist nickname, because it was the name
of a fishwife character in the old Amos & Andy radio program....r
Janet
2017-02-07 16:42:25 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
One doesn't often get to celebrate the 65th anniversary of anything -- sometimes
one hears of people married that long -- so I wonder whether "sapphire" has
traditionally been established for 65, like silver, gold, and diamond?
Or perhaps the designation was invented in honour of the sapphire jewelry given
to the Princess Elizabeth by her father GVIR as a wedding gift, 70 years ago --
which she wears in the official Jubilee portrait?
(Information from the BBC World Service this morning)
Well established in the UK. Our local paper quite often carries reports
of couples married that long or longer.
Because it's highly unusual.
Not that unusual in UK, where 16% of marriages reach the 60th wedding
anniversary.

(ONS, 2012)
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Or do Brits in general have life expectancies
like those of Georgians in the long-ago Dannon Yogurt commercials?
According to the Office of National Statistics

"The number of people living in the UK aged 100 increased by 73% in
the decade to 2012, said the Office for National Statistics (ONS).
Out of the 13,350 centenarians living in the UK in 2012, 660 were
aged 105 years and older.
More than half a million people aged 90 and over were living in the
UK in 2012.

Janet.

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