Discussion:
Dr. Dao [ Killed It ] In World Series of Poker
(too old to reply)
Hen Hanna
2017-04-19 03:42:20 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
as in Kubrick's movie [The Killing]


[kill it] -- I wasn't familiar with this.
Has it been around for long ?


[kill it] is not listed here:
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/kill

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/killing

________________


United Airlines Doctor David Dao Killed It In World Series of Poker

United Airlines Dr. David Dao Killed It As Pro Poker Player


4/11/2017 7:08 AM PDT

David Dao, the doctor who was dragged off the United flight, made a killing on the World Series of Poker while his medical license was suspended in Kentucky.

Dao joined the poker circuit in July 2006 -- one year after his medical license was suspended due to multiple convictions for illegally prescribing painkillers.

In 2009, he came in 2nd in a tournament and walked away with more than $117k.

His player profile shows total earnings of $234,664 in the WSOP.

Some of Dao's competitors are starting to realize he's the same guy from the United incident.

________________

The name TMZ stands for thirty-mile zone, the historic "studio zone" within a 30-mile (50 km) radius centered at the intersection of West Beverly Boulevard and North La Cienega Boulevard in Los Angeles, California.
________________
Ross
2017-04-19 04:53:28 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Hen Hanna
as in Kubrick's movie [The Killing]
[kill it] -- I wasn't familiar with this.
Has it been around for long ?
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/kill
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/killing
________________
United Airlines Doctor David Dao Killed It In World Series of Poker
United Airlines Dr. David Dao Killed It As Pro Poker Player
4/11/2017 7:08 AM PDT
David Dao, the doctor who was dragged off the United flight, made a killing on the World Series of Poker while his medical license was suspended in Kentucky.
Dao joined the poker circuit in July 2006 -- one year after his medical license was suspended due to multiple convictions for illegally prescribing painkillers.
In 2009, he came in 2nd in a tournament and walked away with more than $117k.
His player profile shows total earnings of $234,664 in the WSOP.
Some of Dao's competitors are starting to realize he's the same guy from the United incident.
________________
The name TMZ stands for thirty-mile zone, the historic "studio zone" within a 30-mile (50 km) radius centered at the intersection of West Beverly Boulevard and North La Cienega Boulevard in Los Angeles, California.
________________
= "make a killing" in the text. (to make a profit by gambling, whether at the races, on the stock market, in a casino etc. (Green, from 1890s))

Cf. kill (vt), (US Campus) "to pass an exam, esp. well; to do well,
esp. easily" (from 1900)
Tony Cooper
2017-04-19 06:03:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ross
Post by Hen Hanna
as in Kubrick's movie [The Killing]
[kill it] -- I wasn't familiar with this.
Has it been around for long ?
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/kill
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/killing
________________
United Airlines Doctor David Dao Killed It In World Series of Poker
United Airlines Dr. David Dao Killed It As Pro Poker Player
4/11/2017 7:08 AM PDT
David Dao, the doctor who was dragged off the United flight, made a killing on the World Series of Poker while his medical license was suspended in Kentucky.
Dao joined the poker circuit in July 2006 -- one year after his medical license was suspended due to multiple convictions for illegally prescribing painkillers.
In 2009, he came in 2nd in a tournament and walked away with more than $117k.
His player profile shows total earnings of $234,664 in the WSOP.
Some of Dao's competitors are starting to realize he's the same guy from the United incident.
= "make a killing" in the text. (to make a profit by gambling, whether at the races, on the stock market, in a casino etc. (Green, from 1890s))
Cf. kill (vt), (US Campus) "to pass an exam, esp. well; to do well,
esp. easily" (from 1900)
I don't know where "Hen Hanna" is from, but I have trouble thinking
that anyone familiar with AmE hasn't come across the various versions
of "kill" used in this sense.

To "kill it", or "made a killing" are bog-standard AmE phrases used to
describe a very successful effort.

Wiktionary is not the only source for definitions, but it does have
"make a killing" as "to win or earn a large amount of money".
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/make_a_killing

Cambridge Dictionary has "kill it" as "informal to do something
extremely well" and says it's British English.

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/kill-it

It also has "make a killing" as "to earn a lot of money in a short
time and with little effort". Again, it says it's British English.

http://dictionary.cambridge.org/us/dictionary/english/make-a-killing

To me, they are also very AmE terms.

Note to Hen Hanna: When you search for a definition of a phrase (more
than a single word), enclose the phrase in quote marks: "make a
killing" leads you to the Wiktionary definition.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mark Brader
2017-04-19 06:24:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
To "kill it", or "made a killing" are bog-standard AmE phrases used to
describe a very successful effort.
On the other hand, "bog-standard" is British.
--
Mark Brader "Those who do not understand UNIX
Toronto are condemned to reinvent it."
***@vex.net -- Henry Spencer
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-19 13:29:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
To "kill it", or "made a killing" are bog-standard AmE phrases used to
describe a very successful effort.
On the other hand, "bog-standard" is British.
On the first hand, Tony Cooper is an anglomaniac who tries to use briticisms as often
as possible in his typing. He probably doesn't attempt it either at his photography club
or at his Little League spectating.

NB intransitive "kill" is what a stand-up comic does when successful.
Charles Bishop
2017-04-19 14:10:05 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
To "kill it", or "made a killing" are bog-standard AmE phrases used to
describe a very successful effort.
On the other hand, "bog-standard" is British.
We don't get to borrow it?





charles, I know you know that doesn't mean it isn't borrowable, but do
you know I know you know it?
Tony Cooper
2017-04-19 15:14:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 07:10:05 -0700, Charles Bishop
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
To "kill it", or "made a killing" are bog-standard AmE phrases used to
describe a very successful effort.
On the other hand, "bog-standard" is British.
We don't get to borrow it?
It's an interesting phrase. Like many phrases used, the origin is
clouded. One web discussion says it was originated by someone at BBC
as a derogatory description of the production values of rival ATV, an
organization headed by Lew Grade: Lew Grade > loo grade > toilet
quality > bog standard.

But, that same source says its a mispronunciation of "box standard"
and quotes Sir Clive Sinclair in _Computerworld_ magazine: "We
cannot forsee a day when a computer becomes just a standard box. There
will be box-standard machines along the road, but we do not simply
have to make those." (1983)

And, tracing "box-standard", Stephen Fry said "In the early years of
the 20th century, children's construction sets, like Meccano, were
sold in two kinds, labelled 'Box Standard' and 'Box Deluxe'. And that,
or so they say and persuade me, is where we get the two phrases 'bog
standard' and 'dog's bollocks'!" (2005)

The article concludes "Neither of these ideas holds water".

I will leave it to others to show how "holds water" originated as a
phrase to mean "appears to be valid, sound, or reasonable".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
pensive hamster
2017-04-19 16:10:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
To "kill it", or "made a killing" are bog-standard AmE phrases used to
describe a very successful effort.
On the other hand, "bog-standard" is British.
We don't get to borrow it?
It's an interesting phrase. Like many phrases used, the origin is
clouded. One web discussion says it was originated by someone at BBC
as a derogatory description of the production values of rival ATV, an
organization headed by Lew Grade: Lew Grade > loo grade > toilet
quality > bog standard.
I (BrE) would interpret "bog standard" as "boringly average or ordinary
or typical", rather than as necessarily "low grade".
Post by Tony Cooper
But, that same source says its a mispronunciation of "box standard"
and quotes Sir Clive Sinclair in _Computerworld_ magazine: "We
cannot forsee a day when a computer becomes just a standard box. There
will be box-standard machines along the road, but we do not simply
have to make those." (1983)
And, tracing "box-standard", Stephen Fry said "In the early years of
the 20th century, children's construction sets, like Meccano, were
sold in two kinds, labelled 'Box Standard' and 'Box Deluxe'. And that,
or so they say and persuade me, is where we get the two phrases 'bog
standard' and 'dog's bollocks'!" (2005)
The article concludes "Neither of these ideas holds water".
I will leave it to others to show how "holds water" originated as a
phrase to mean "appears to be valid, sound, or reasonable".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-19 16:46:07 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by pensive hamster
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
To "kill it", or "made a killing" are bog-standard AmE phrases used to
describe a very successful effort.
On the other hand, "bog-standard" is British.
We don't get to borrow it?
It's an interesting phrase. Like many phrases used, the origin is
clouded. One web discussion says it was originated by someone at BBC
as a derogatory description of the production values of rival ATV, an
organization headed by Lew Grade: Lew Grade > loo grade > toilet
quality > bog standard.
I (BrE) would interpret "bog standard" as "boringly average or ordinary
or typical", rather than as necessarily "low grade".
That's certainly the interpretation suggested by the contexts in which it's been
encountered in British discourse.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-19 17:56:21 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 09:46:07 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by pensive hamster
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
To "kill it", or "made a killing" are bog-standard AmE phrases used to
describe a very successful effort.
On the other hand, "bog-standard" is British.
We don't get to borrow it?
It's an interesting phrase. Like many phrases used, the origin is
clouded. One web discussion says it was originated by someone at BBC
as a derogatory description of the production values of rival ATV, an
organization headed by Lew Grade: Lew Grade > loo grade > toilet
quality > bog standard.
I (BrE) would interpret "bog standard" as "boringly average or ordinary
or typical", rather than as necessarily "low grade".
That's certainly the interpretation suggested by the contexts in which it's been
encountered in British discourse.
It is possible to misinterpret was is intended. Someone who wants
something special, out of the ordinary, may well look down upon anything
that is "ordinary/average/normal". To such a person "ordinary" = "low
quality".

OED:

slang (depreciative, chiefly Brit.).

Ordinary, basic, standard; without extra features or modification;
unexceptional or uninspired.

1962 Motor Sport Apr. 283/1 (advt.) Bog standard Sprite, 1959,
two owners.
1968 Hot Car Oct. 35/1 The brakes are bog-standard—anyway Barry
says he only uses them in the paddock!
1972 Daily Mirror 15 May 21/1 She was ‘bog standard’—meaning
straight from the production line without modifications.
1978 Personal Computer World 1 No. 2. 30/1 They built the
interface themselves, and they bought the drive and the controller
bog-standard from its supplier, for £3,000 or £4,000.
<etc.>
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Mark Brader
2017-04-19 17:59:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
The article concludes "Neither of these ideas holds water".
I will leave it to others to show how "holds water" originated as a
phrase to mean "appears to be valid, sound, or reasonable".
Surely a plumbing metaphor. And one that was famously turned around
in 1961 when one John W. Gardner said:

"The society which scorns excellence in plumbing as a humble
activity and tolerates shoddiness in philosophy because it is
an exalted activity will have neither good plumbing nor good
philosophy: neither its pipes nor its theories will hold water."
--
Mark Brader "A facility for quotation covers the absence
Toronto of original thought" -- Lord Peter Wimsey
***@vex.net (Philip Broadley, "Gaudy Night")

My text in this article is in the public domain.
J. J. Lodder
2017-04-20 09:05:39 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
The article concludes "Neither of these ideas holds water".
I will leave it to others to show how "holds water" originated as a
phrase to mean "appears to be valid, sound, or reasonable".
Surely a plumbing metaphor. And one that was famously turned around
"The society which scorns excellence in plumbing as a humble
activity and tolerates shoddiness in philosophy because it is
an exalted activity will have neither good plumbing nor good
philosophy: neither its pipes nor its theories will hold water."
Doubt it. American philosophy can be flushed down the drain,
in this post-modernism and post-truth era.

The drain doesn't seem to leak,

Jan
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-20 11:39:46 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
The article concludes "Neither of these ideas holds water".
I will leave it to others to show how "holds water" originated as a
phrase to mean "appears to be valid, sound, or reasonable".
Surely a plumbing metaphor. And one that was famously turned around
"The society which scorns excellence in plumbing as a humble
activity and tolerates shoddiness in philosophy because it is
an exalted activity will have neither good plumbing nor good
philosophy: neither its pipes nor its theories will hold water."
Doubt it. American philosophy can be flushed down the drain,
in this post-modernism and post-truth era.
What's that "s/" jargon the computer jocks use? You mean "French philosophy." Postmodernism
was invented by such as Barthes and Foucault and Derrida.
Post by J. J. Lodder
The drain doesn't seem to leak,
Jenny Telia
2017-04-19 07:13:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
I don't know where "Hen Hanna" is from
She comes from the far off land of 'alt.english.usage' where her
strangely formatted cluckings can be found scattered everywhere. They
make sense after much effort on the part of the reader.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-04-19 07:23:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Tony Cooper
I don't know where "Hen Hanna" is from
She comes from the far off land of 'alt.english.usage' where her
strangely formatted cluckings can be found scattered everywhere. They
make sense after much effort on the part of the reader.
She also clucks at sci.lang. She made earlier efforts to infiltrate
alt.usage.english, but didn't like having it pointed out that we
already have a long-standing frequent poster who signs himself HH.
--
athel
Hen Hanna
2017-04-19 19:31:04 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ross
Post by Hen Hanna
[kill it] -- I wasn't familiar with this.
Has it been around for long ?
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/kill
= "make a killing" in the text. (to make a profit by gambling, whether at the races, on the stock market, in a casino etc. (Green, from 1890s))
Cf. kill (vt), (US Campus) "to pass an exam, esp. well; to do well,
esp. easily" (from 1900)
Thank you. "make a killing" I've been familiar with most of my life.

[kill it] _is_ listed here:
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/kill

4. (?) That night, she was dressed to kill. That joke always kills me.

13. You really killed it at the Comedy Store last night.

HH
Loading...