Discussion:
Reversing in backwards
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Harrison Hill
2018-02-07 18:10:46 UTC
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In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".

She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
Peter Young
2018-02-07 18:23:56 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".
She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
When was learning to drive, what seems like centuries ago, my driving
instructor would always talk about "reversing backwards". As his
meaning was clear, I didn't correct his grammar,

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Pt)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Ken Blake
2018-02-07 19:05:37 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".
She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
When was learning to drive, what seems like centuries ago, my driving
instructor would always talk about "reversing backwards". As his
meaning was clear, I didn't correct his grammar,
The meaning isn't clear to me. "Reversing backwards" sounds like a
double negative. Does that mean "going forward"? I doubt it. Perhaps
the double negative is just meant to reinforce a single negative, and
what he meant was what I would call "backing up." But I'm not sure.
Peter Young
2018-02-07 19:44:34 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".
She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
When was learning to drive, what seems like centuries ago, my driving
instructor would always talk about "reversing backwards". As his
meaning was clear, I didn't correct his grammar,
The meaning isn't clear to me. "Reversing backwards" sounds like a
double negative. Does that mean "going forward"? I doubt it. Perhaps
the double negative is just meant to reinforce a single negative, and
what he meant was what I would call "backing up." But I'm not sure.
I was sure at the time that going backwards was what he meant.
Confusing double negatives isn't uncommon in some registers of spoken
BrE. I imagine that this applies in places Over There too.

"I aint' got no ..."

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Pt)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Harrison Hill
2018-02-07 19:47:34 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".
She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
When was learning to drive, what seems like centuries ago, my driving
instructor would always talk about "reversing backwards". As his
meaning was clear, I didn't correct his grammar,
The meaning isn't clear to me. "Reversing backwards" sounds like a
double negative. Does that mean "going forward"? I doubt it. Perhaps
the double negative is just meant to reinforce a single negative, and
what he meant was what I would call "backing up." But I'm not sure.
Why do you see it as a "double negative", rather than two
positives reinforcing each other?

Heavily weighted.
The far away distance.
Deep Purple.
A black hole.
Security fencing.

...everyday English?
Harrison Hill
2018-02-07 20:00:21 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".
She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
When was learning to drive, what seems like centuries ago, my driving
instructor would always talk about "reversing backwards". As his
meaning was clear, I didn't correct his grammar,
The meaning isn't clear to me. "Reversing backwards" sounds like a
double negative. Does that mean "going forward"? I doubt it. Perhaps
the double negative is just meant to reinforce a single negative, and
what he meant was what I would call "backing up." But I'm not sure.
Why do you see it as a "double negative", rather than two
positives reinforcing each other?
Heavily weighted.
The far away distance.
Deep Purple.
A black hole.
Security fencing.
...everyday English?
Your furthest horizon.
World Champion.
Extreme danger.
Wild adventure.
Green nature.
Calm reflection.

Positives reinforcing positives in the normal way.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-02-07 20:10:17 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".
She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
When was learning to drive, what seems like centuries ago, my driving
instructor would always talk about "reversing backwards". As his
meaning was clear, I didn't correct his grammar,
The meaning isn't clear to me. "Reversing backwards" sounds like a
double negative. Does that mean "going forward"? I doubt it. Perhaps
the double negative is just meant to reinforce a single negative, and
what he meant was what I would call "backing up." But I'm not sure.
Why do you see it as a "double negative", rather than two
positives reinforcing each other?
Heavily weighted.
The far away distance.
Deep Purple.
A black hole.
Security fencing.
...everyday English?
Yes, everyday, but that's because they're not necessarily
tautologous. There are light weighting, near distance,
less deep shades of colours, holes that aren't black (your
windows are covering such holes!) and fencing that is not
a security measure. Reversing backwards is obviously not
a double negative but it is inescapably tautologous.
Ken Blake
2018-02-08 18:42:36 UTC
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On Wed, 7 Feb 2018 11:47:34 -0800 (PST), Harrison Hill
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".
She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
When was learning to drive, what seems like centuries ago, my driving
instructor would always talk about "reversing backwards". As his
meaning was clear, I didn't correct his grammar,
The meaning isn't clear to me. "Reversing backwards" sounds like a
double negative. Does that mean "going forward"? I doubt it. Perhaps
the double negative is just meant to reinforce a single negative, and
what he meant was what I would call "backing up." But I'm not sure.
Why do you see it as a "double negative",
Because to me going forward is positive, and "reversing" and
"backwards" are opposites of it.
Post by Harrison Hill
rather than two
positives reinforcing each other?
Well, that could be an interpretation, but it certainly wasn't the one
that first came to my mind.
Default User
2018-02-08 18:19:03 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".
She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
I gather this means backing into a parking space? Is this considered
undesireable behavior?


Brian
Harrison Hill
2018-02-08 18:35:45 UTC
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Post by Default User
Post by Harrison Hill
In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".
She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
I gather this means backing into a parking space? Is this considered
undesireable behavior?
Double negatives: "I shouldn't wonder if it didn't rain", etc.
RH Draney
2018-02-08 21:11:29 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Double negatives: "I shouldn't wonder if it didn't rain", etc.
I often hear "I miss not being able to visit my parents"....

(Double's for beginners...try: "I'd be far from lying if I neglected to
deny that I couldn't help but fail to disagree less")....r
Ken Blake
2018-02-08 18:47:44 UTC
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On Thu, 8 Feb 2018 18:19:03 +0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by Harrison Hill
In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".
She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
I gather this means backing into a parking space? Is this considered
undesireable behavior?
To me, backing up is one of the most dangerous thing you can do
driving. Whenever I can, I park in the second of two contiguous
parking spaces, so I can drive through the first and into the second,
and when I leave, I can leave by going forward.

For the past several weeks, I've had a new car with a backup camera,
so a lot of the backing up risk is gone. But I still look for those
contiguous parking spaces.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-02-08 21:44:56 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
On Thu, 8 Feb 2018 18:19:03 +0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by Harrison Hill
In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".
She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
I gather this means backing into a parking space? Is this considered
undesireable behavior?
To me, backing up is one of the most dangerous thing you can do
driving. Whenever I can, I park in the second of two contiguous
parking spaces, so I can drive through the first and into the second,
and when I leave, I can leave by going forward.
I did that yesterday and today in the same (large) car park. The places
I parked in were within a few seconds walk of one another.
Post by Ken Blake
For the past several weeks, I've had a new car with a backup camera,
so a lot of the backing up risk is gone. But I still look for those
contiguous parking spaces.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
soup
2018-02-08 19:20:47 UTC
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Post by Default User
Post by Harrison Hill
In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".
She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
I gather this means backing into a parking space? Is this considered
undesireable behavior?
Not the "backing into a parking space, but the "reversing backwards"
as opposed to 'reversing forwards' or 'driving backwards'
Tony Cooper
2018-02-08 20:23:30 UTC
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On Thu, 8 Feb 2018 18:19:03 +0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by Harrison Hill
In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".
She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
I gather this means backing into a parking space? Is this considered
undesireable behavior?
There are signs in some parking areas that tell people not to back
into parking spaces. I didn't know if there's any law or ordinance
that says you can't, but I Googled and found that it is illegal in
Orange County, California.

https://www.ocregister.com/2008/04/11/ask-us-why-is-backing-into-parking-spaces-illegal/

Of course, the no backing-in does not pertain to parallel parking
where backing-in is the normal method.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
charles
2018-02-08 20:29:29 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
On Thu, 8 Feb 2018 18:19:03 +0000 (UTC), "Default User"
Post by Default User
Post by Harrison Hill
In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".
She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
I gather this means backing into a parking space? Is this considered
undesireable behavior?
There are signs in some parking areas that tell people not to back
into parking spaces. I didn't know if there's any law or ordinance
that says you can't, but I Googled and found that it is illegal in
Orange County, California.
The only place I've met this is wheer the slots are against a building. The
prohibition is to prevent exhaust fumes going directly into the open
windows.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
James Wilkinson Sword
2018-02-08 20:35:52 UTC
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Post by Default User
Post by Harrison Hill
In the "wacky-races" scenario my poor wife experiences
every day - in her "road-rage" car park - are people who
insist on "reversing in backwards".
She has guided one backwards into a wall today, but more
importantly: is her grammar okay?
I gather this means backing into a parking space? Is this considered
undesireable behavior?
Definitely. Consider a supermarket car park. A few cars are following each other looking for a space, the first one spots a space and drives just beyond it, intending on reversing in. He expects the cars following him to notice this and leave a gap, waiting for him to go in. Instead he could have just drove straight in forwards without holding anyone up. When someone in front of me tries to park backwards, I drive in forwards and take their space. If they get angry I say, "You drove past it, I assumed you didn't want this space", which really pisses them off.
--
Carenza Lewis about finding food in the Middle Ages on 'Time Team Live' said: "You'd eat beaver if you could get it."
RH Draney
2018-02-08 21:13:08 UTC
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On Thu, 08 Feb 2018 18:19:03 -0000, Default User
Post by Default User
I gather this means backing into a parking space? Is this considered
undesireable behavior?
Definitely.  Consider a supermarket car park.  A few cars are following
each other looking for a space, the first one spots a space and drives
just beyond it, intending on reversing in.  He expects the cars
following him to notice this and leave a gap, waiting for him to go in.
Instead he could have just drove straight in forwards without holding
anyone up.  When someone in front of me tries to park backwards, I drive
in forwards and take their space.  If they get angry I say, "You drove
past it, I assumed you didn't want this space", which really pisses them
off.
I hope someone backs over you coming *out* of a space....r
James Wilkinson Sword
2018-02-08 21:35:46 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
On Thu, 08 Feb 2018 18:19:03 -0000, Default User
Post by Default User
I gather this means backing into a parking space? Is this considered
undesireable behavior?
Definitely. Consider a supermarket car park. A few cars are following
each other looking for a space, the first one spots a space and drives
just beyond it, intending on reversing in. He expects the cars
following him to notice this and leave a gap, waiting for him to go in.
Instead he could have just drove straight in forwards without holding
anyone up. When someone in front of me tries to park backwards, I drive
in forwards and take their space. If they get angry I say, "You drove
past it, I assumed you didn't want this space", which really pisses them
off.
I hope someone backs over you coming *out* of a space....r
Unlike the arseholes who back in, I back out. So I can wait until nobody's there, and inconvenience noone. When I drive into the space, I go in without stopping. But they expect others to wait for them. I once encountered such an idiot trying to reverse into his own driveway. The road was quite busy, and several cars were stuck behind him refusing to all reverse back out of the way, and couldn't get past him because cars were coming in the opposite direction. Many horns were hooted and the stupid cunt didn't get to reverse into his driveway at all. He had to drive round the block and try again.
--
Judi: "Hon, what is my love worth to you?"
Amanpreet: "Am I buying, or selling?"
Peeler
2018-02-08 22:10:58 UTC
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On Thu, 08 Feb 2018 20:35:52 -0000, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
Post by Default User
I gather this means backing into a parking space? Is this considered
undesireable behavior?
Definitely.
You are DEFINITELY a very sick idiot, Birdbrain!
--
Gay Wanker Birdbrain lying about his sky-diving capabilities:
"All you do is turn up at the local airfield and give them £200. Sounded
like a big roller coaster ride to me. And it was, great fun! My instructor
said I was the only person she'd ever seen who didn't look scared when I
jumped out of the plane. FFS they give you TWO parachutes, what could go
wrong?"
MID: <***@red.lan>
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