Discussion:
Double parking
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Will Parsons
2018-05-05 21:28:26 UTC
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What *is* double parking, anyway? And does it differ according to
location?

The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
cars) already parked on the side of a street. This is pretty common
in highly-congested areas, such as in New York City. I have now come
across a different meaning, in which the term refers to parking
overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.

So, I'm interested in what "double parking" means to other people.

--
Will
b***@shaw.ca
2018-05-05 22:18:31 UTC
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On Saturday, May 5, 2018 at 2:28:29 PM UTC-7, Will Parsons wrote:
> What *is* double parking, anyway? And does it differ according to
> location?
>
> The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
> cars) already parked on the side of a street. This is pretty common
> in highly-congested areas, such as in New York City. I have now come
> across a different meaning, in which the term refers to parking
> overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
>
> So, I'm interested in what "double parking" means to other people.
>
I have lived five years or more in each of three Canadian cities. In all
of them, "double parking" meant parking parallel to a legally
parked car. It was the sort of thing people did when there were
no empty spaces nearby and they had a brief errand to run, such
as picking something up from a shop.

I would do it only if I could remain at the wheel while someone
else ran the errand.

I've never heard of the second sense until now.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-05 22:24:41 UTC
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On Saturday, May 5, 2018 at 6:18:38 PM UTC-4, ***@shaw.ca wrote:
> On Saturday, May 5, 2018 at 2:28:29 PM UTC-7, Will Parsons wrote:
> > What *is* double parking, anyway? And does it differ according to
> > location?
> >
> > The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
> > cars) already parked on the side of a street. This is pretty common
> > in highly-congested areas, such as in New York City. I have now come
> > across a different meaning, in which the term refers to parking
> > overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
> >
> > So, I'm interested in what "double parking" means to other people.
> >
> I have lived five years or more in each of three Canadian cities. In all
> of them, "double parking" meant parking parallel to a legally
> parked car. It was the sort of thing people did when there were
> no empty spaces nearby and they had a brief errand to run, such
> as picking something up from a shop.
>
> I would do it only if I could remain at the wheel while someone
> else ran the errand.

That would be "standing" rather than parking.

> I've never heard of the second sense until now.

Me either.
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-05 23:41:12 UTC
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On 05-May-18 23:24, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
> On Saturday, May 5, 2018 at 6:18:38 PM UTC-4, ***@shaw.ca wrote:
>> On Saturday, May 5, 2018 at 2:28:29 PM UTC-7, Will Parsons wrote:
>>> What *is* double parking, anyway? And does it differ according to
>>> location?
>>>
>>> The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
>>> cars) already parked on the side of a street. This is pretty common
>>> in highly-congested areas, such as in New York City. I have now come
>>> across a different meaning, in which the term refers to parking
>>> overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
>>>
>>> So, I'm interested in what "double parking" means to other people.
>>>
>> I have lived five years or more in each of three Canadian cities. In all
>> of them, "double parking" meant parking parallel to a legally
>> parked car. It was the sort of thing people did when there were
>> no empty spaces nearby and they had a brief errand to run, such
>> as picking something up from a shop.
>>
>> I would do it only if I could remain at the wheel while someone
>> else ran the errand.
>
> That would be "standing" rather than parking.
>
In BrE (IIRC) that would be "waiting" - or, just possibly, "loading or
unloading".

Most of my journeys on roads which are hardly wide enough to permit two
way traffic with one row of parked cars - let alone two.


--
Sam Plusnet
Jerry Friedman
2018-05-06 02:20:52 UTC
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On 5/5/18 5:41 PM, Sam Plusnet wrote:
> On 05-May-18 23:24, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
>> On Saturday, May 5, 2018 at 6:18:38 PM UTC-4, ***@shaw.ca wrote:
>>> On Saturday, May 5, 2018 at 2:28:29 PM UTC-7, Will Parsons wrote:
>>>> What *is* double parking, anyway?  And does it differ according to
>>>> location?
>>>>
>>>> The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
>>>> cars) already parked on the side of a street.
...

>>> I would do it only if I could remain at the wheel while someone
>>> else ran the errand.
>>
>> That would be "standing" rather than parking.
>>
> In BrE (IIRC) that would be "waiting" - or, just possibly, "loading or
> unloading".
>
> Most of my journeys on roads which are hardly wide enough to permit two
> way traffic with one row of parked cars - let alone two.

Based on my slightly less than comprehensive survey of British and Irish
roads, they're all like that except the motorways.

--
Jerry Friedman
HVS
2018-05-05 23:20:47 UTC
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On Sat, 5 May 2018 15:18:31 -0700 (PDT), ***@shaw.ca wrote:
> On Saturday, May 5, 2018 at 2:28:29 PM UTC-7, Will Parsons wrote:
> > What *is* double parking, anyway? And does it differ according to
> > location?
> >
> > The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or
line of
> > cars) already parked on the side of a street. This is pretty
common
> > in highly-congested areas, such as in New York City. I have now
come
> > across a different meaning, in which the term refers to parking
> > overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
> >
> > So, I'm interested in what "double parking" means to other people.
> >
> I have lived five years or more in each of three Canadian cities.
In all
> of them, "double parking" meant parking parallel to a legally
> parked car. It was the sort of thing people did when there were
> no empty spaces nearby and they had a brief errand to run, such
> as picking something up from a shop.


> I would do it only if I could remain at the wheel while someone
> else ran the errand.


> I've never heard of the second sense until now.

Same here.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-06 07:35:09 UTC
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On 2018-05-05 22:18:31 +0000, ***@shaw.ca said:

> On Saturday, May 5, 2018 at 2:28:29 PM UTC-7, Will Parsons wrote:
>> What *is* double parking, anyway? And does it differ according to
>> location?
>>
>> The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
>> cars) already parked on the side of a street. This is pretty common
>> in highly-congested areas, such as in New York City. I have now come
>> across a different meaning, in which the term refers to parking
>> overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
>>
>> So, I'm interested in what "double parking" means to other people.
>>
> I have lived five years or more in each of three Canadian cities. In all
> of them, "double parking" meant parking parallel to a legally
> parked car. It was the sort of thing people did when there were
> no empty spaces nearby and they had a brief errand to run, such
> as picking something up from a shop.
>
> I would do it only if I could remain at the wheel while someone
> else ran the errand.

I do that often, whenever my wife goes to the dry cleaners.
>
> I've never heard of the second sense until now.


--
athel
Mark Brader
2018-05-05 22:38:19 UTC
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Will Parsons:
> What *is* double parking, anyway?
...
> The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
> cars) already parked on the side of a street.

That's correct.

> This is pretty common in highly-congested areas...

No, I hardly ever see it.

> I have now come across a different meaning, in which the term refers
> to parking overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.

No, that's so selfish there isn't a term for it.

ObXkcd: 562.
--
Mark Brader "It is considered a sign of great {winnitude}
Toronto when your Obs are more interesting than other
***@vex.net people's whole postings." --Eric Raymond
Tony Cooper
2018-05-05 23:18:03 UTC
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On Sat, 05 May 2018 17:38:19 -0500, ***@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote:

>Will Parsons:
>> What *is* double parking, anyway?
> ...
>> The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
>> cars) already parked on the side of a street.
>
>That's correct.
>
>> This is pretty common in highly-congested areas...
>
>No, I hardly ever see it.
>
>> I have now come across a different meaning, in which the term refers
>> to parking overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
>
>No, that's so selfish there isn't a term for it.
>

Equally unacceptable to me is the person who parks at an angle -
taking up two spaces - in a store's parking lot. It's usually someone
with a new car or an expensive car who doesn't want to get dinged by
an opening door of another car.

You can get a ticket in this city for not parking between painted
lines on a street, but tickets aren't issued to people who do this in
a store's parking lot.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Sam Plusnet
2018-05-05 23:42:15 UTC
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On 06-May-18 0:18, Tony Cooper wrote:
> On Sat, 05 May 2018 17:38:19 -0500, ***@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote:
>
>> Will Parsons:
>>> What *is* double parking, anyway?
>> ...
>>> The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
>>> cars) already parked on the side of a street.
>>
>> That's correct.
>>
>>> This is pretty common in highly-congested areas...
>>
>> No, I hardly ever see it.
>>
>>> I have now come across a different meaning, in which the term refers
>>> to parking overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
>>
>> No, that's so selfish there isn't a term for it.
>>
>
> Equally unacceptable to me is the person who parks at an angle -
> taking up two spaces - in a store's parking lot. It's usually someone
> with a new car or an expensive car who doesn't want to get dinged by
> an opening door of another car.
>
> You can get a ticket in this city for not parking between painted
> lines on a street, but tickets aren't issued to people who do this in
> a store's parking lot.
>
>
What happens if your vehicle is too large to fit entirely within the
painted lines?

--
Sam Plusnet
Tony Cooper
2018-05-06 00:14:58 UTC
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On Sun, 6 May 2018 00:42:15 +0100, Sam Plusnet <***@home.com> wrote:

>On 06-May-18 0:18, Tony Cooper wrote:
>> On Sat, 05 May 2018 17:38:19 -0500, ***@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote:
>>
>>> Will Parsons:
>>>> What *is* double parking, anyway?
>>> ...
>>>> The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
>>>> cars) already parked on the side of a street.
>>>
>>> That's correct.
>>>
>>>> This is pretty common in highly-congested areas...
>>>
>>> No, I hardly ever see it.
>>>
>>>> I have now come across a different meaning, in which the term refers
>>>> to parking overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
>>>
>>> No, that's so selfish there isn't a term for it.
>>>
>>
>> Equally unacceptable to me is the person who parks at an angle -
>> taking up two spaces - in a store's parking lot. It's usually someone
>> with a new car or an expensive car who doesn't want to get dinged by
>> an opening door of another car.
>>
>> You can get a ticket in this city for not parking between painted
>> lines on a street, but tickets aren't issued to people who do this in
>> a store's parking lot.
>>
>>
>What happens if your vehicle is too large to fit entirely within the
>painted lines?

Unless you are driving a semi-truck, that wouldn't happen. The space
between the lines is longer than any automobile or four-wheel truck
because space is allowed to maneuver into the space.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
b***@shaw.ca
2018-05-06 01:03:43 UTC
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On Saturday, May 5, 2018 at 4:42:18 PM UTC-7, Sam Plusnet wrote:
> On 06-May-18 0:18, Tony Cooper wrote:
> > On Sat, 05 May 2018 17:38:19 -0500, ***@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote:
> >
> >> Will Parsons:
> >>> What *is* double parking, anyway?
> >> ...
> >>> The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
> >>> cars) already parked on the side of a street.
> >>
> >> That's correct.
> >>
> >>> This is pretty common in highly-congested areas...
> >>
> >> No, I hardly ever see it.
> >>
> >>> I have now come across a different meaning, in which the term refers
> >>> to parking overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
> >>
> >> No, that's so selfish there isn't a term for it.
> >>
> >
> > Equally unacceptable to me is the person who parks at an angle -
> > taking up two spaces - in a store's parking lot. It's usually someone
> > with a new car or an expensive car who doesn't want to get dinged by
> > an opening door of another car.
> >
> > You can get a ticket in this city for not parking between painted
> > lines on a street, but tickets aren't issued to people who do this in
> > a store's parking lot.
> >
> >
> What happens if your vehicle is too large to fit entirely within the
> painted lines?
>
You're driving a Hummer. You should take it to the nearest cliff
and drive over the edge.

bill
Jerry Friedman
2018-05-06 02:26:35 UTC
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On 5/5/18 7:03 PM, ***@shaw.ca wrote:
> On Saturday, May 5, 2018 at 4:42:18 PM UTC-7, Sam Plusnet wrote:
>> On 06-May-18 0:18, Tony Cooper wrote:
...

>>> You can get a ticket in this city for not parking between painted
>>> lines on a street, but tickets aren't issued to people who do this in
>>> a store's parking lot.
>>>
>>>
>> What happens if your vehicle is too large to fit entirely within the
>> painted lines?
>>
> You're driving a Hummer. You should take it to the nearest cliff
> and drive over the edge.

:-)

--
Jerry Friedman
Jerry Friedman
2018-05-06 02:22:59 UTC
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On 5/5/18 5:18 PM, Tony Cooper wrote:
> On Sat, 05 May 2018 17:38:19 -0500, ***@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote:
>
>> Will Parsons:
>>> What *is* double parking, anyway?
>> ...
>>> The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
>>> cars) already parked on the side of a street.
>>
>> That's correct.
>>
>>> This is pretty common in highly-congested areas...
>>
>> No, I hardly ever see it.
>>
>>> I have now come across a different meaning, in which the term refers
>>> to parking overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
>>
>> No, that's so selfish there isn't a term for it.
>>
>
> Equally unacceptable to me is the person who parks at an angle -
> taking up two spaces - in a store's parking lot.

That's what Will said.

> It's usually someone
> with a new car or an expensive car who doesn't want to get dinged by
> an opening door of another car.
>
> You can get a ticket in this city for not parking between painted
> lines on a street, but tickets aren't issued to people who do this in
> a store's parking lot.

Informal enforcement methods are available to passers-by, I'm told.

--
Jerry Friedman
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-06 07:43:01 UTC
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On 2018-05-05 23:18:03 +0000, Tony Cooper said:

> On Sat, 05 May 2018 17:38:19 -0500, ***@vex.net (Mark Brader) wrote:
>
>> Will Parsons:
>>> What *is* double parking, anyway?
>> ...
>>> The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
>>> cars) already parked on the side of a street.
>>
>> That's correct.
>>
>>> This is pretty common in highly-congested areas...
>>
>> No, I hardly ever see it.
>>
>>> I have now come across a different meaning, in which the term refers
>>> to parking overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
>>
>> No, that's so selfish there isn't a term for it.
>>
>
> Equally unacceptable to me is the person who parks at an angle -
> taking up two spaces - in a store's parking lot. It's usually someone
> with a new car or an expensive car who doesn't want to get dinged by
> an opening door of another car.
>
> You can get a ticket in this city for not parking between painted
> lines on a street, but tickets aren't issued to people who do this in
> a store's parking lot.

Parking places in France tend to be barely wider than a standard car
("barely" meaning about 15 cm of space on each side), so getting in
between the lines either means some manoeuvering or parking so close to
an already parked car that it's difficult to get out. I parked
yesterday at a supermarket in a way you woould find unacceptable. Mind
you, if you arrived in an American car wide enough to seat three adults
in the front you'd find it impossible to get between the lines.


--
athel
Tony Cooper
2018-05-05 22:58:56 UTC
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On Sat, 5 May 2018 17:28:26 -0400, Will Parsons
<***@nodomain.invalid> wrote:

>What *is* double parking, anyway? And does it differ according to
>location?
>
>The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
>cars) already parked on the side of a street. This is pretty common
>in highly-congested areas, such as in New York City. I have now come
>across a different meaning, in which the term refers to parking
>overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
>
>So, I'm interested in what "double parking" means to other people.

To me, it is parking a car on the street-side of already parked cars.
If you double-park, you block the car on the curb-side from leaving
that parking space.

The other thing, not parking within painted lines, will get you a
ticket here, but I don't know of a specific term that describes that.


--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
HVS
2018-05-05 23:22:34 UTC
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On Sat, 05 May 2018 18:58:56 -0400, Tony Cooper
<***@gmail.com> wrote:
> On Sat, 5 May 2018 17:28:26 -0400, Will Parsons
> <***@nodomain.invalid> wrote:


> >What *is* double parking, anyway? And does it differ according to
> >location?
> >
> >The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line
of
> >cars) already parked on the side of a street. This is pretty
common
> >in highly-congested areas, such as in New York City. I have now
come
> >across a different meaning, in which the term refers to parking
> >overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
> >
> >So, I'm interested in what "double parking" means to other people.


> To me, it is parking a car on the street-side of already parked
cars.
> If you double-park, you block the car on the curb-side from leaving
> that parking space.


> The other thing, not parking within painted lines, will get you a
> ticket here, but I don't know of a specific term that describes
that.

"Asshole parking" would work for me.
Horace LaBadie
2018-05-05 23:33:19 UTC
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In article <***@mid.individual.net>,
Will Parsons <***@nodomain.invalid> wrote:

> What *is* double parking, anyway? And does it differ according to
> location?
>
> The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
> cars) already parked on the side of a street. This is pretty common
> in highly-congested areas, such as in New York City.

That's the common term that I know.


> I have now come
> across a different meaning, in which the term refers to parking
> overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
>
> So, I'm interested in what "double parking" means to other people.

The only term for that malpractice that I have heard consistently is
"hogging," either with or without "space."
Jerry Friedman
2018-05-06 02:25:54 UTC
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On 5/5/18 3:28 PM, Will Parsons wrote:
> What *is* double parking, anyway? And does it differ according to
> location?
>
> The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
> cars) already parked on the side of a street. This is pretty common
> in highly-congested areas, such as in New York City. I have now come
> across a different meaning, in which the term refers to parking
> overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
>
> So, I'm interested in what "double parking" means to other people.

Same as what it means to you, except that in some places it's possible
to park so as to block one or two cars in a parking lot, and I call that
double parking too.

--
Jerry Friedman
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-06 07:33:51 UTC
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On 2018-05-05 21:28:26 +0000, Will Parsons said:

> What *is* double parking, anyway? And does it differ according to
> location?
>
> The term has always meant to me parking parallel to a car (or line of
> cars) already parked on the side of a street. This is pretty common
> in highly-congested areas, such as in New York City. I have now come
> across a different meaning, in which the term refers to parking
> overlapping two delineated spaces in a parking lot.
>
> So, I'm interested in what "double parking" means to other people.

The same as it does to you.

--
athel
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