Discussion:
bilingual puns -- (no Off-Topic chatter !)
(too old to reply)
Hen Hanna
2018-01-10 21:46:04 UTC
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(no Off-Topic chatter !)
every post must have (at least) an
Ob[bilingual pun] section (in a box).


thanks for NOT HALT ( == emergency stop )


https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/Not

Etymology[edit] From Middle High German nōt, from Old High German nōt from Proto-Germanic *naudiz. Compare Low German Noot, Dutch nood, English need, Danish nød, Icelandic nauð.


------ this etymology is NOT helpful. HH




Freunde in der Not gehen hundert auf ein Lot oder auch Freunde in der Not gehen tausend auf ein Lot.

Spare in der Zeit, dann hast du in der Not.


------ those are instantly intelligible, NOT !
(i.e. stantly telligible)


What's a trilingual pun, other than those by Joyce?
HH
HVS
2018-01-10 23:44:35 UTC
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On Wed, 10 Jan 2018 13:46:04 -0800 (PST), Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
(no Off-Topic chatter !)
every post must have (at least) an
Ob[bilingual pun] section (in a box).
Screw that for a game of soldiers....

AUE doesn't work like that: posters don't get to dictate the rules of
posting.

Let's now talk about food. (Or sheep.)
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-01-11 09:17:03 UTC
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Post by HVS
Post by Hen Hanna
(no Off-Topic chatter !)
every post must have (at least) an
Ob[bilingual pun] section (in a box).
Screw that for a game of soldiers....
AUE doesn't work like that: posters don't get to dictate the rules of posting.
Among the rules we don't get to dictate is that posts should be
intelligible and laid out with normal punctuation and formatting.
Post by HVS
Let's now talk about food. (Or sheep.)
--
athel
occam
2018-01-16 14:24:36 UTC
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Post by HVS
 (no Off-Topic chatter !)
       every post must have (at least) an
       Ob[bilingual pun]  section (in a box).
Screw that for a game of soldiers....
AUE doesn't work like that: posters don't get to dictate the rules of
posting.
Let's now talk about food. (Or sheep.)
Have you got the AUE Committee's agreement for that?

BTW, has anyone checked Hen Hanna's AUE membership number? I think it
should be verified. After all, Obama's birth certificate was.
HVS
2018-01-16 16:36:56 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by HVS
 (no Off-Topic chatter !)
       every post must have (at least) an
       Ob[bilingual pun]  section (in a box).
Screw that for a game of soldiers....
AUE doesn't work like that: posters don't get to dictate the rules of
posting.
Let's now talk about food. (Or sheep.)
Have you got the AUE Committee's agreement for that?
I don't need to, as I'm a mem......

Aha! You nearly tricked me there!
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng (30yrs) and BrEng (34yrs), indiscriminately mixed
Hen Hanna
2018-01-11 20:06:48 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
(no Off-Topic chatter !)
every post must have (at least) an
Ob[bilingual pun] section (in a box).
If you're sick, eat garlic: garlic's good for what ails you.
------ I don't get it.
Post by Hen Hanna
A friend recently told me this one-liner: "What do you get when you
cross a condom with a Torah?
Answer- A safer Torah. (in Hebrew, sefer torah refers to Torah scroll.)
This got me wondering if anyone knows any other bilingual puns.
J. Joyce, /Finnegans Wake/, or so I'm told.
V. Nabokov, passim. "Van, /je suis sur la verge/ (Blanche again) of a
revolting amorous adventure." (/Ada/, Part Two, Chapter 1, p. 334. A
character named Blanche had given a memorable speech in Franglais.)
A pachuco is cruising in his lowrider and sees a pretty girl from
behind. He opens the window and calls out, "Hop on, esa!"
She says, "How did you know I'm Japanese?"
How do you spell socks?
S-o-c-k-s.
¡Eso sí que es!
Apologies to a.u.e.-ers and former a.u.s.-ers who have suffered through
those last two before.
Are explanations in order? "Verge" is French for penis. "Esa",
literally "that", is a friendly pachuco address to a girl or
woman--feminine of "ese", from the greeting "¡Ese bato!", "that guy!"
"Japonesa" is Spanish for a female Japanese. The last punchline is
Spanish that I can't parse for something like "That's just what it is!"
--
Jerry Friedman
--
Jerry Friedman
( never did watched that show [Mary Hartman] [Mary Hartman] )



thanks. that's a great one, and I can make it better,
by adding at least one more language.


A pachuco is cruising in his lowrider and sees a pretty girl from
behind. He opens the window and calls out, "Hop on, esa. Hmm!"

She says, "How did you know I'm half-Japanese (from Hawaii) ? "

______________

The L.A.-Romeo's line sounds like [Hapa Neh-san]

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/hapa


https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=nee-san
Japanese noun for "sister".
-san being a touch of respect. -chan for cute.


jlearn.net/Dictionary/Browse/1307640-neesan-ねえさん-姉さん
.... meanings for neesan (ねえさん) include 'elder sister'.
The kanji for neesan is 姉さん.

HH
HVS
2018-01-11 21:40:20 UTC
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On Thu, 11 Jan 2018 12:06:48 -0800 (PST), Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
Ob[bilingual pun] section (in a box).
If you're sick, eat garlic: garlic's good for what ails you.
------ I don't get it.
"Ail" is French for "garlic".
Hen Hanna
2018-01-11 22:09:25 UTC
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Post by HVS
On Thu, 11 Jan 2018 12:06:48 -0800 (PST), Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
If you're sick, eat garlic: garlic's good for what ails you.
------ I don't get it.
"Ail" is French for "garlic".
thanks.... I'd got it just minutes earlier.


https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/ailler
the verb may have a good conjugation for that,
or maybe there's a good ADJ form.

Would a [garlic-adder] by (un) ailleur ?

_______________

it also works as a monolingual joke (of semantics).


IF garlic's good for what ails me (= flu virus),
then my illness will become worse.

HH
RH Draney
2018-01-11 22:19:16 UTC
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Post by HVS
Post by Hen Hanna
        Ob[bilingual pun]  section (in a box).
If you're sick, eat garlic: garlic's good for what ails you.
       ------  I don't get it.
"Ail" is French for "garlic".
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group about
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it had to be
explained...that was when I came up with the concept of a pun too
perfect to be recognized as such, a concept that appeared again when I
chimed in recently on a discussion about barter vs coined money being
"completely different species"....r
Hen Hanna
2018-01-11 22:39:25 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by HVS
Post by Hen Hanna
If you're sick, eat garlic: garlic's good for what ails you.
       ------  I don't get it.
"Ail" is French for "garlic".
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group about
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it had to be
explained...
pls explain.
Post by RH Draney
that was when I came up with the concept of a pun too
perfect to be recognized as such, a concept that appeared again when I
chimed in recently on a discussion about barter vs coined money being
"completely different species"....r
pls explain. (even tho I have a hunch)


___________________

Ob[additional material]


A pachuco is cruising in his lowrider and sees a pretty girl from
behind. He opens the window and calls out, "Hop on, esa. Hmm!"

She says, "How did you know I'm half-Japanese (from Hawaii) ?
No, Pa-chuco! "


she could have meant:
[Ne Pas] - Chuuko or
No, Pas- Chuuko

( NO, (because yours is an old) Second-hand (Car) )


https://www.japandict.com/中古
chuuko - used, second-hand, old.

jlearn.net/Dictionary/Browse/1424150-chuuko-ちゅうこ-中古
... meanings for chuuko (ちゅうこ) include 'used,second-hand,old'.


HH
RH Draney
2018-01-12 05:04:00 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group about
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it had to be
explained...
pls explain.
The same plant is known as both "bay" and "laurel", the former when the
leaves are used to season food and the latter when they're used for
decoration....
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
that was when I came up with the concept of a pun too
perfect to be recognized as such, a concept that appeared again when I
chimed in recently on a discussion about barter vs coined money being
"completely different species"....r
pls explain. (even tho I have a hunch)
The word "specie" refers to money coined as representative of value and
used in trade, with no significance to any intrinsic value of the money
itself....r
Richard Tobin
2018-01-12 13:05:56 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group about
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it had to be
explained...
pls explain.
The same plant is known as both "bay" and "laurel", the former when the
leaves are used to season food and the latter when they're used for
decoration....
The tree commonly known as laurel in Britain is a different one,
with bigger, poisonous leaves.

-- Richard
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-01-12 13:17:43 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RH Draney
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group about
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it had to be
explained...
pls explain.
The same plant is known as both "bay" and "laurel", the former when the
leaves are used to season food and the latter when they're used for
decoration....
The tree commonly known as laurel in Britain is a different one,
with bigger, poisonous leaves.
Indeed. Apart from not being a laurel (it's a prunus) and not being
a tree, we've nailed it!
Mack A. Damia
2018-01-12 16:03:16 UTC
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On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 05:17:43 -0800 (PST), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RH Draney
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group about
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it had to be
explained...
pls explain.
The same plant is known as both "bay" and "laurel", the former when the
leaves are used to season food and the latter when they're used for
decoration....
The tree commonly known as laurel in Britain is a different one,
with bigger, poisonous leaves.
Indeed. Apart from not being a laurel (it's a prunus) and not being
a tree, we've nailed it!
And the laurel is quite hardy.
Snidely
2018-01-13 08:30:29 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 05:17:43 -0800 (PST), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RH Draney
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group about
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it had to be
explained...
pls explain.
The same plant is known as both "bay" and "laurel", the former when the
leaves are used to season food and the latter when they're used for
decoration....
The tree commonly known as laurel in Britain is a different one,
with bigger, poisonous leaves.
Indeed. Apart from not being a laurel (it's a prunus) and not being
a tree, we've nailed it!
And the laurel is quite hardy.
I can't stan this.

/dps
--
Maybe C282Y is simply one of the hangers-on, a groupie following a
future guitar god of the human genome: an allele with undiscovered
virtuosity, currently soloing in obscurity in Mom's garage.
Bradley Wertheim, theAtlantic.com, Jan 10 2013
Jerry Friedman
2018-01-13 16:44:07 UTC
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Post by Snidely
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 05:17:43 -0800 (PST), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RH Draney
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group about
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it had to be
explained...
pls explain.
The same plant is known as both "bay" and "laurel", the former when
the leaves are used to season food and the latter when they're used
for decoration....
The tree commonly known as laurel in Britain is a different one,
with bigger, poisonous leaves.
Indeed. Apart from not being a laurel (it's a prunus) and not being
a tree, we've nailed it!
And the laurel is quite hardy.
I can't stan this.
You'd prefer to talk about a tree that's more olive?
--
Jerry Friedman
J. J. Lodder
2018-01-13 18:21:18 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Snidely
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 05:17:43 -0800 (PST), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RH Draney
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group about
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it had to be
explained...
pls explain.
The same plant is known as both "bay" and "laurel", the former when
the leaves are used to season food and the latter when they're used
for decoration....
The tree commonly known as laurel in Britain is a different one,
with bigger, poisonous leaves.
Indeed. Apart from not being a laurel (it's a prunus) and not being
a tree, we've nailed it!
And the laurel is quite hardy.
I can't stan this.
You'd prefer to talk about a tree that's more olive?
I'm sure they are more olive than that,
in the Virgin Islands,

Jan
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-01-13 10:21:01 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RH Draney
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group about
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it had to be
explained...
pls explain.
The same plant is known as both "bay" and "laurel", the former when the
leaves are used to season food and the latter when they're used for
decoration....
The tree commonly known as laurel in Britain is a different one,
with bigger, poisonous leaves.
That may be why the one with edible leaves is often called a "bay
laurel", which sounds like a tautology, but isn't.
--
athel
Jerry Friedman
2018-01-13 16:56:12 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RH Draney
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group about
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it had to be
explained...
pls explain.
The same plant is known as both "bay" and "laurel", the former when the
leaves are used to season food and the latter when they're used for
decoration....
The tree commonly known as laurel in Britain is a different one,
with bigger, poisonous leaves.
That may be why the one with edible leaves is often called a "bay
laurel", which sounds like a tautology, but isn't.
In California and Oregon, "bay laurel" means a native tree in the laurel
family, I've read. It has edible leaves with a stronger flavor than
those of the true laurel. I assume that's why real bay leaves are
labeled "imported" in the U.S.
--
Jerry Friedman
Cheryl
2018-01-13 18:50:49 UTC
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On Sat, 13 Jan 2018 09:56:12 -0700, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RH Draney
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group about
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it had to be
explained...
pls explain.
The same plant is known as both "bay" and "laurel", the former when the
leaves are used to season food and the latter when they're used for
decoration....
The tree commonly known as laurel in Britain is a different one,
with bigger, poisonous leaves.
That may be why the one with edible leaves is often called a "bay
laurel", which sounds like a tautology, but isn't.
In California and Oregon, "bay laurel" means a native tree in the laurel
family, I've read. It has edible leaves with a stronger flavor than
those of the true laurel. I assume that's why real bay leaves are
labeled "imported" in the U.S.
I think there are other cases of plant substitutions - I think I read
somewhere that what is imported and sold as cinnamon isn't,
technically, real cinnamon but from a similar but different an
cheaper plant. Wikipedia says that there are several tree species
that produce cinnamon.
--
Cheryl
Ken Blake
2018-01-13 19:52:31 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
I think there are other cases of plant substitutions - I think I read
somewhere that what is imported and sold as cinnamon isn't,
technically, real cinnamon but from a similar but different an
cheaper plant.
I believe that's often but not always the case. It is possible to buy
real cinnamon, but in my experience it's very difficult to know for
sure whether what
Quinn C
2018-01-15 22:39:45 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
On Sat, 13 Jan 2018 09:56:12 -0700, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RH Draney
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group
about
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RH Draney
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it
had to be
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RH Draney
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
explained...
pls explain.
The same plant is known as both "bay" and "laurel", the former
when the
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RH Draney
leaves are used to season food and the latter when they're used
for
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RH Draney
decoration....
The tree commonly known as laurel in Britain is a different one,
with bigger, poisonous leaves.
That may be why the one with edible leaves is often called a "bay
laurel", which sounds like a tautology, but isn't.
In California and Oregon, "bay laurel" means a native tree in the
laurel
Post by Jerry Friedman
family, I've read. It has edible leaves with a stronger flavor
than
Post by Jerry Friedman
those of the true laurel. I assume that's why real bay leaves are
labeled "imported" in the U.S.
I think there are other cases of plant substitutions - I think I read
somewhere that what is imported and sold as cinnamon isn't,
technically, real cinnamon but from a similar but different an
cheaper plant. Wikipedia says that there are several tree species
that produce cinnamon.
Speaking of which - "Indian bay leaf" is a tree from the cinnamon
genus (in the laurel family).
--
The country has its quota of fools and windbags; such people are
most prominent in politics, where their inherent weaknesses seem
less glaring and attract less ridicule than they would in other
walks of life. -- Robert Bothwell et.al.: Canada since 1945
Jerry Friedman
2018-01-15 23:26:52 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
On Sat, 13 Jan 2018 09:56:12 -0700, Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Cheryl
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Richard Tobin
The tree commonly known as laurel in Britain is a different one,
with bigger, poisonous leaves.
That may be why the one with edible leaves is often called a "bay
laurel", which sounds like a tautology, but isn't.
In California and Oregon, "bay laurel" means a native tree in the
laurel
Post by Jerry Friedman
family, I've read.  It has edible leaves with a stronger flavor
than
Post by Jerry Friedman
those of the true laurel.  I assume that's why real bay leaves are
labeled "imported" in the U.S.
I think there are other cases of plant substitutions - I think I read
somewhere that what is imported and sold as cinnamon isn't, technically,
real cinnamon but from a similar but different an cheaper plant.
Wikipedia says that there are several tree species that produce cinnamon.
Ceylon cinnamon, /Cinnamonum verum/, is considered the best. In stick
form, it consists of many thin, flaky layers rather than one thicker,
hard one, or so I've heard.
--
Jerry Friedman
Richard Tobin
2018-01-16 14:14:38 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
I think there are other cases of plant substitutions - I think I read
somewhere that what is imported and sold as cinnamon isn't,
technically, real cinnamon but from a similar but different an
cheaper plant. Wikipedia says that there are several tree species
that produce cinnamon.
You might be thinking of cassia bark.

-- Richard
Hen Hanna
2018-01-12 20:30:16 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RH Draney
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group about
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it had to be
explained...
pls explain.
The same plant is known as both "bay" and "laurel", the former when the
leaves are used to season food and the latter when they're used for
decoration....
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
that was when I came up with the concept of a pun too
perfect to be recognized as such, a concept that appeared again when I
chimed in recently on a discussion about barter vs coined money being
"completely different species"....r
pls explain. (even tho I have a hunch)
The word "specie" refers to money coined as representative of value and
used in trade, with no significance to any intrinsic value of the money
itself....r
thank you!


[ the concept of a pun too
perfect to be recognized as such, ]


I'd like to come up with a name for this.

stealthypun, (stealthy) Magpun, ninjapun,
autopun,
spontaneous, spun, punsive, ......


how about........ a deadpun ?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Deadpan


The pun is so good that it's a dud (or dead).
dudpun, Dodpun


https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/dead_center

Here's my imagery: a shooter hits the dead center
2 times (or more) so that his excellence is invisible.

------ I think there are shooting anecdotes about this
(= ppl mistakenly thought that the shooter missed the
target altogether.)


_________________________

One way (for an author) to note a "deadpun" is
to say: (pun intended) or
(no pun intended) -- a lie ?



Another way is what VN (Nabokov) did:

insert a note like: Well-read Humbert!

__________________

.......... I wish I might digress and tell you more of the pavor
nocturnus that would rack me at night hideously after a chance term had struck me in the random readings of my boyhood, such as peine forte et dure (what a Genius of Pain must have invented that!) or the dreadful, mysterious, insidious words “trauma,” “traumatic event,” and “transom.” But my tale is sufficiently incondite already.


After a while I destroyed the letter and went to my room, and ruminated, and rumpled my hair, and modeled my purple robe, and moaned through clenched teeth and suddenly — Suddenly, gentlemen of the jury, I felt a Dostoevskian grin dawning (through the very grimace that twisted my lips) like a distant and terrible sun. I imagined (under conditions of new and perfect visibility) all the casual caresses her mother’s husband would be able to lavish on his Lolita. I would hold her against me three times a day, every day. All my troubles would be expelled, I would be a healthy man. “To hold thee lightly on a gentle knee and print on thy soft cheek a parent’s kiss…” Well-read Humbert!


Then, with all possible caution,on mental tiptoe so to speak, I conjured up Charlotte as a possible mate. By God, I could make myself bring her that economically halved grapefruit, that sugarless breakfast.

__________________

exact center of a target ##Finnish: napakymppi
Jp do-man-naka
Jerry Friedman
2018-01-12 20:37:02 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by RH Draney
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group about
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it had to be
explained...
pls explain.
The same plant is known as both "bay" and "laurel", the former when the
leaves are used to season food and the latter when they're used for
decoration....
...

Except sometimes in iambic tetrameter.

How vainly men themselves amaze
To win the oak, the palm, the bays!
--Marvell

Say, Britain! could you ever boast
Three poets in an age at most?
Our chilling climate hardly bears
A sprig of bays in fifty years,
While ev'ry fool his claim alleges,
As if it grew in common hedges.
--Swift
--
Jerry Friedman
occam
2018-01-16 14:32:34 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RH Draney
A couple of years ago when I made some crack in this group about
"keeping someone at bay" and "resting on your laurels", it had to be
explained...that was when I came up with the concept of a pun too
perfect to be recognized as such, a concept that appeared again when I
chimed in recently on a discussion about barter vs coined money being
"completely different species"....r
Just goes to show. It is a prime example of why it does not pay to be
"too clever by half". You end up having to spell out your cleverness to
others.

We have no such concerns about the Hen's posts. Dumb as they come.
Quinn C
2018-01-11 22:42:39 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
(no Off-Topic chatter !)
every post must have (at least) an
Ob[bilingual pun] section (in a box).
If you're sick, eat garlic: garlic's good for what ails you.
------ I don't get it.
Post by Hen Hanna
A friend recently told me this one-liner: "What do you get when you
cross a condom with a Torah?
Answer- A safer Torah. (in Hebrew, sefer torah refers to Torah scroll.)
This got me wondering if anyone knows any other bilingual puns.
J. Joyce, /Finnegans Wake/, or so I'm told.
V. Nabokov, passim. "Van, /je suis sur la verge/ (Blanche again) of a
revolting amorous adventure." (/Ada/, Part Two, Chapter 1, p. 334. A
character named Blanche had given a memorable speech in Franglais.)
Just some things from memory.

I like Nabokov's little poem that goes like this:

Ce beau jardin fleurit en mai
Mais en hiver
Jamais, jamais, jamais, jamais, jamais
N'est vert, n'est vert, n'est vert, n'est vert, n'est vert.

Educated Europeans often indulged in this.

Mozart wrote <https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bona_nox>

I read that Chopin wrote in a letter that a certain lady had been
"not in evening dress, but in ivresse."
--
If you kill one person, you go to jail; if you kill 20, you go
to an institution for the insane; if you kill 20,000, you get
political asylum. -- Reed Brody, special counsel
for prosecutions at Human Rights Watch
Hen Hanna
2018-01-13 18:32:51 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
(no Off-Topic chatter !)
every post must have (at least) an
Ob[bilingual pun] section (in a box).
If you're sick, eat garlic: garlic's good for what ails you.
Gaelic's good for what Eire's ye.
Post by Quinn C
Just some things from memory.
Ce beau jardin fleurit en mai
Mais en hiver
Jamais, jamais, jamais, jamais, jamais
N'est vert, n'est vert, n'est vert, n'est vert, n'est vert.
thank you!

2nd line: the pronunciation is Mais e-[never]

Ja-Mai-s where the last S is
the adverbial genitive S,
as in Jenseits, Whereabouts.

Jamais = Ja "(Yes) but" (German + French)


ref. to Poe's ......... and ...........


ref. to Shakespeare's King Lear:

“Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life, /
And thou no breath at all?
Thou'lt come no more, /
Never, never, never, never, never!” (5.3 . 306–8)


Lear's monologue refers to Cordelia's death.
Hen Hanna
2018-02-23 20:31:08 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Quinn C
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
(no Off-Topic chatter !)
every post must have (at least) an
Ob[bilingual pun] section (in a box).
If you're sick, eat garlic: garlic's good for what ails you.
Gaelic's good for what Eire's ye.
Post by Quinn C
Just some things from memory.
Ce beau jardin fleurit en mai
Mais en hiver
Jamais, jamais, jamais, jamais, jamais
N'est vert, n'est vert, n'est vert, n'est vert, n'est vert.
thank you!
2nd line: the pronunciation is Mais e-[never]
Ja-Mai-s where the last S is
the adverbial genitive S,
as in Jenseits, Whereabouts.
Jamais = Ja "(Yes) but" (German + French)
ref. to Poe's ......... and ...........
“Why should a dog, a horse, a rat, have life, /
And thou no breath at all?
Thou'lt come no more, /
Never, never, never, never, never!” (5.3 . 306–8)
Lear's monologue refers to Cordelia's death.
Post by Quinn C
Post by Hen Hanna
I do know that the Kardashians are a famous family
because they are...what?
One of them has a huge bottom.
Q: ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre un hombre y una mujer?
A: El hombre es masculino
y la mujer es más culona.
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
nice! LHOOQ


Q: What do you get if you cross an elephant with a rhino?
A: Elephino.


Por que a Tintin no se la llama Twenty?
Hen Hanna
2018-02-23 22:12:54 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Quinn C
Post by Hen Hanna
I do know that the Kardashians are a famous family
because they are...what?
One of them has a huge bottom.
Q: ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre un hombre y una mujer?
A: El hombre es masculino
y la mujer es más culona.
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
nice! LHOOQ
Q: What do you get if you cross an elephant with a rhino?
A: Elephino.
Por que a Tintin no se la llama Twenty?
Post by Hen Hanna
I do know that the Kardashians are a famous family
because they are...what?
Why are the sisters famous ?

Car they're Scho"ns. (French-Eng.-Ger.)

or

Car they're chiennes.

https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/chienne

______________

if others can salvage bilingual puns (or other good stuff)
from the original thread (that got trashed/ruined),
and Copy&Paste them here, that'd be great !

HH
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-02-23 23:21:30 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Quinn C
Post by Hen Hanna
I do know that the Kardashians are a famous family
because they are...what?
One of them has a huge bottom.
Q: ¿Cuál es la diferencia entre un hombre y una mujer?
A: El hombre es masculino
y la mujer es más culona.
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
nice! LHOOQ
Q: What do you get if you cross an elephant with a rhino?
A: Elephino.
Por que a Tintin no se la llama Twenty?
Post by Hen Hanna
I do know that the Kardashians are a famous family
because they are...what?
Why are the sisters famous ?
Because they are the daughters of O J Simpson's defence lawyer
and are well acquainted with the Hilton's. Kim originally appeared
as an adjunct of Paris Hilton in one of the latter's many 'reality'
series and was asked to front "Keeping Up With The Kardashians"
on the strength of it in 2007. The rest, as they say, is history.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-02-24 04:14:04 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
I do know that the Kardashians are a famous family
Why are the sisters famous ?
Because they are the daughters of O J Simpson's defence lawyer
They don't look anything like Johnnie Cochran.
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
and are well acquainted with the Hilton's. Kim originally appeared
as an adjunct of Paris Hilton in one of the latter's many 'reality'
series and was asked to front "Keeping Up With The Kardashians"
on the strength of it in 2007. The rest, as they say, is history.
You know an awful lot about the Kardashians.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-02-24 12:32:51 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
I do know that the Kardashians are a famous family
Why are the sisters famous ?
Because they are the daughters of O J Simpson's defence lawyer
They don't look anything like Johnnie Cochran.
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
and are well acquainted with the Hilton's. Kim originally appeared
as an adjunct of Paris Hilton in one of the latter's many 'reality'
series and was asked to front "Keeping Up With The Kardashians"
on the strength of it in 2007. The rest, as they say, is history.
You know an awful lot about the Kardashians.
I know an awful lot of things about a lot of things, not all by
design!
Katy Jennison
2018-02-24 13:10:30 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
I do know that the Kardashians are a famous family
Why are the sisters famous ?
Because they are the daughters of O J Simpson's defence lawyer
They don't look anything like Johnnie Cochran.
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
and are well acquainted with the Hilton's. Kim originally appeared
as an adjunct of Paris Hilton in one of the latter's many 'reality'
series and was asked to front "Keeping Up With The Kardashians"
on the strength of it in 2007. The rest, as they say, is history.
You know an awful lot about the Kardashians.
I know an awful lot of things about a lot of things, not all by
design!
Wikipedia has a lot to answer for.
--
Katy Jennison
b***@aol.com
2018-01-12 05:48:42 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
(no Off-Topic chatter !)
every post must have (at least) an
Ob[bilingual pun] section (in a box).
If you're sick, eat garlic: garlic's good for what ails you.
------ I don't get it.
This French aliment often causes nose ailment.
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
A friend recently told me this one-liner: "What do you get when you
cross a condom with a Torah?
Answer- A safer Torah. (in Hebrew, sefer torah refers to Torah scroll.)
This got me wondering if anyone knows any other bilingual puns.
J. Joyce, /Finnegans Wake/, or so I'm told.
V. Nabokov, passim. "Van, /je suis sur la verge/ (Blanche again) of a
revolting amorous adventure." (/Ada/, Part Two, Chapter 1, p. 334. A
character named Blanche had given a memorable speech in Franglais.)
A pachuco is cruising in his lowrider and sees a pretty girl from
behind. He opens the window and calls out, "Hop on, esa!"
She says, "How did you know I'm Japanese?"
How do you spell socks?
S-o-c-k-s.
¡Eso sí que es!
Apologies to a.u.e.-ers and former a.u.s.-ers who have suffered through
those last two before.
Are explanations in order? "Verge" is French for penis. "Esa",
literally "that", is a friendly pachuco address to a girl or
woman--feminine of "ese", from the greeting "¡Ese bato!", "that guy!"
"Japonesa" is Spanish for a female Japanese. The last punchline is
Spanish that I can't parse for something like "That's just what it is!"
--
Jerry Friedman
--
Jerry Friedman
( never did watched that show [Mary Hartman] [Mary Hartman] )
thanks. that's a great one, and I can make it better,
by adding at least one more language.
A pachuco is cruising in his lowrider and sees a pretty girl from
behind. He opens the window and calls out, "Hop on, esa. Hmm!"
She says, "How did you know I'm half-Japanese (from Hawaii) ? "
______________
The L.A.-Romeo's line sounds like [Hapa Neh-san]
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/hapa
https://www.urbandictionary.com/define.php?term=nee-san
Japanese noun for "sister".
-san being a touch of respect. -chan for cute.
jlearn.net/Dictionary/Browse/1307640-neesan-ねえさん-姉さん
.... meanings for neesan (ねえさん) include 'elder sister'.
The kanji for neesan is 姉さん.
HH
Quinn C
2018-01-15 22:39:45 UTC
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Post by b***@aol.com
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
(no Off-Topic chatter !)
every post must have (at least) an
Ob[bilingual pun] section (in a box).
If you're sick, eat garlic: garlic's good for what ails you.
------ I don't get it.
This French aliment often causes nose ailment.
I think you refer to paying through the nose after a divorce?
--
- It's alimentary, kotzen.
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