Discussion:
"Five minute anniversary"
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s***@my-deja.com
2018-07-05 15:32:11 UTC
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To change the subject slightly,
where did the "six month anniversary" come from?
It must have been discussed before.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-07-05 16:51:22 UTC
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Post by s***@my-deja.com
To change the subject slightly,
where did the "six month anniversary" come from?
It must have been discussed before.
I don't know when they use of "aniversary" to mean a date a particular
time after an event, started.

It is obviously an extension of the original use of the word meaning a
day which has the same date as the event.

An anniversary is often thought of as a commemoration as well as a date.

There is no obvious English word for the date
"n months/weeks/days/minutes after an event" so "anniversary seems to
have been coopted to serve as such with the time period explicitly
stated. That is used so often that it is sometimes necessary for a real,
i.e. annual, anniversary to be qualified by a mention of years or
annualness.

This was published in 1972:
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=M245AAAAIAAJ&lpg=PA56&ots=8F3Lqi1G4N&dq=%22annual%20anniversary%22&pg=PA56#v=onepage&q=%22annual%20anniversary%22&f=false

The Code of Federal Regulations of the United States of America

In those regulations the phrase "annual anniversary" is used to mean
"anniversary" in its original sense.

There are other uses as "annual anniversary" such as this:
https://www.facebook.com/events/1834784603432743/

Texas Hill Country Furniture & Merchantile
16th Annual Anniversary Celebration

I assume that implies that the celebration is held annually on the
anniversary. Not all anniversaries are celebrated every year.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
the Omrud
2018-07-05 18:38:59 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by s***@my-deja.com
To change the subject slightly,
where did the "six month anniversary" come from?
It must have been discussed before.
I don't know when they use of "aniversary" to mean a date a particular
time after an event, started.
It is obviously an extension of the original use of the word meaning a
day which has the same date as the event.
An anniversary is often thought of as a commemoration as well as a date.
There is no obvious English word for the date
"n months/weeks/days/minutes after an event" so "anniversary seems to
have been coopted to serve as such with the time period explicitly
stated. That is used so often that it is sometimes necessary for a real,
i.e. annual, anniversary to be qualified by a mention of years or
annualness.
Yes. I've noticed a creeping increase in terms such as "their one-year
anniversary".
--
David
s***@my-deja.com
2018-07-07 09:49:50 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by s***@my-deja.com
To change the subject slightly,
where did the "six month anniversary" come from?
It must have been discussed before.
I don't know when they use of "aniversary" to mean a date a particular
time after an event, started.
It is obviously an extension of the original use of the word meaning a
day which has the same date as the event.
An anniversary is often thought of as a commemoration as well as a date.
There is no obvious English word for the date
"n months/weeks/days/minutes after an event" so "anniversary seems to
have been coopted to serve as such with the time period explicitly
stated. That is used so often that it is sometimes necessary for a real,
i.e. annual, anniversary to be qualified by a mention of years or
annualness.
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=M245AAAAIAAJ&lpg=PA56&ots=8F3Lqi1G4N&dq=%22annual%20anniversary%22&pg=PA56#v=onepage&q=%22annual%20anniversary%22&f=false
The Code of Federal Regulations of the United States of America
In those regulations the phrase "annual anniversary" is used to mean
"anniversary" in its original sense.
https://www.facebook.com/events/1834784603432743/
Texas Hill Country Furniture & Merchantile
16th Annual Anniversary Celebration
I assume that implies that the celebration is held annually on the
anniversary. Not all anniversaries are celebrated every year.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK (in alt.usage.english)
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.

As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".

It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-07 10:56:05 UTC
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Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by s***@my-deja.com
To change the subject slightly,
where did the "six month anniversary" come from?
It must have been discussed before.
I don't know when they use of "aniversary" to mean a date a particular
time after an event, started.
It is obviously an extension of the original use of the word meaning a
day which has the same date as the event.
An anniversary is often thought of as a commemoration as well as a date.
There is no obvious English word for the date
"n months/weeks/days/minutes after an event" so "anniversary seems to
have been coopted to serve as such with the time period explicitly
stated. That is used so often that it is sometimes necessary for a real,
i.e. annual, anniversary to be qualified by a mention of years or
annualness.
https://books.google.co.uk/books?id=M245AAAAIAAJ&lpg=PA56&ots=8F3Lqi1G4N&dq=%22annual%20anniversary%22&pg=PA56#v=onepage&q=%22annual%20anniversary%22&f=false
The Code of Federal Regulations of the United States of America
In those regulations the phrase "annual anniversary" is used to mean
"anniversary" in its original sense.
https://www.facebook.com/events/1834784603432743/
Texas Hill Country Furniture & Merchantile
16th Annual Anniversary Celebration
I assume that implies that the celebration is held annually on the
anniversary. Not all anniversaries are celebrated every year.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK (in alt.usage.english)
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
The reason that nobody has is that anniversary has a very
particular form, literally 'the turning of the year'. Six months
doesn't 'turn' in the same way at all. A day does but who
considers a day's turning worthy of note?

If people want to mark these odd periods then they should
break away from the 'versaries' altogether and either come
up with true neologism or simply say, like 'normal' folk, "It's
x months to the day .. let's drink!"
s***@my-deja.com
2018-07-09 13:28:13 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
The reason that nobody has is that anniversary has a very
particular form, literally 'the turning of the year'. Six months
doesn't 'turn' in the same way at all. A day does but who
considers a day's turning worthy of note?
If people want to mark these odd periods then they should
break away from the 'versaries' altogether and either come
up with true neologism or simply say, like 'normal' folk, "It's
x months to the day .. let's drink!"
Thank you. That is the antidote... It is x months/days since.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-08 16:02:50 UTC
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Post by s***@my-deja.com
[ … ]
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-08 16:53:25 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.

Sesqui- means '1 1/2'. We regularly observe sesquicentennials of things
that happened 150 years ago.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-08 17:03:36 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'.
That's why I suggested sesquianniversary for 18 months. Wasn't that obvious?
Post by Peter T. Daniels
We regularly observe sesquicentennials of things
that happened 150 years ago.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-08 17:19:57 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'.
That's why I suggested sesquianniversary for 18 months. Wasn't that obvious?
No. Anniversaries aren't counted in months, but in years.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
We regularly observe sesquicentennials of things
that happened 150 years ago.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-08 17:31:46 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'.
That's why I suggested sesquianniversary for 18 months. Wasn't that obvious?
No. Anniversaries aren't counted in months, but in years.
18 months = one and a half years! "anni" are years.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
We regularly observe sesquicentennials of things
that happened 150 years ago.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-08 19:12:25 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'.
That's why I suggested sesquianniversary for 18 months. Wasn't that obvious?
No. Anniversaries aren't counted in months, but in years.
And year-and-a-half observations hadn't been mentioned. Celebrating the
sesquianniversary of 1 January 2018 on 1 July 2019 seems rather silly.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
18 months = one and a half years! "anni" are years.
The 18 was (deliberately?) misleading.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
We regularly observe sesquicentennials of things
that happened 150 years ago.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-08 20:42:28 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'.
That's why I suggested sesquianniversary for 18 months. Wasn't that obvious?
No. Anniversaries aren't counted in months, but in years.
And year-and-a-half observations hadn't been mentioned. Celebrating the
sesquianniversary of 1 January 2018 on 1 July 2019 seems rather silly.
Why? In any case, if that's silly the whole discussion has been silly
(since it started, and before I entered it).
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
18 months = one and a half years! "anni" are years.
The 18 was (deliberately?) misleading.
Really? It hadn't occurred to you that a year and a half is 18 months?
There was no intention to mislead. People who follow young children
growing up never talk about "a year and a half"; they talk about 18
months -- an important age for young children, as important as one or
two years, maybe more.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
We regularly observe sesquicentennials of things
that happened 150 years ago.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-09 04:20:43 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'.
That's why I suggested sesquianniversary for 18 months. Wasn't that obvious?
No. Anniversaries aren't counted in months, but in years.
And year-and-a-half observations hadn't been mentioned. Celebrating the
sesquianniversary of 1 January 2018 on 1 July 2019 seems rather silly.
Why? In any case, if that's silly the whole discussion has been silly
(since it started, and before I entered it).
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
18 months = one and a half years! "anni" are years.
The 18 was (deliberately?) misleading.
Really? It hadn't occurred to you that a year and a half is 18 months?
There was no intention to mislead. People who follow young children
growing up never talk about "a year and a half"; they talk about 18
months -- an important age for young children, as important as one or
two years, maybe more.
Ages of children are not their "anniversaries." Once a year they are their
birthdays. It would be equally silly to celebrate Johnny's sesquibirthday
when he reached 18 months.

Children's ages are given in months until about age 2.
RH Draney
2018-07-09 04:57:22 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
And year-and-a-half observations hadn't been mentioned. Celebrating the
sesquianniversary of 1 January 2018 on 1 July 2019 seems rather silly.
Why? In any case, if that's silly the whole discussion has been silly
(since it started, and before I entered it).
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
18 months = one and a half years! "anni" are years.
The 18 was (deliberately?) misleading.
Really? It hadn't occurred to you that a year and a half is 18 months?
There was no intention to mislead. People who follow young children
growing up never talk about "a year and a half"; they talk about 18
months -- an important age for young children, as important as one or
two years, maybe more.
Ages of children are not their "anniversaries." Once a year they are their
birthdays. It would be equally silly to celebrate Johnny's sesquibirthday
when he reached 18 months.
Any "friends of Bill W" here who can attest to whether a sobriety badge
is awarded at any half-year milestone?...r
Katy Jennison
2018-07-08 20:49:09 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'.
That's why I suggested sesquianniversary for 18 months. Wasn't that obvious?
No. Anniversaries aren't counted in months, but in years.
And year-and-a-half observations hadn't been mentioned. Celebrating the
sesquianniversary of 1 January 2018 on 1 July 2019 seems rather silly.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
18 months = one and a half years! "anni" are years.
The 18 was (deliberately?) misleading.
Some of us weren't misled at all. In fact at least one of us thought
"Ooh, that's clever!"
--
Katy Jennison
John Varela
2018-07-08 23:00:19 UTC
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On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 20:49:09 UTC, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'.
That's why I suggested sesquianniversary for 18 months. Wasn't that obvious?
No. Anniversaries aren't counted in months, but in years.
And year-and-a-half observations hadn't been mentioned. Celebrating the
sesquianniversary of 1 January 2018 on 1 July 2019 seems rather silly.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
18 months = one and a half years! "anni" are years.
The 18 was (deliberately?) misleading.
Some of us weren't misled at all. In fact at least one of us thought
"Ooh, that's clever!"
Why do you people waste your time engaging with him?
--
John Varela
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-08 23:04:17 UTC
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Post by John Varela
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 20:49:09 UTC, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'.
That's why I suggested sesquianniversary for 18 months. Wasn't that obvious?
No. Anniversaries aren't counted in months, but in years.
And year-and-a-half observations hadn't been mentioned. Celebrating the
sesquianniversary of 1 January 2018 on 1 July 2019 seems rather silly.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
18 months = one and a half years! "anni" are years.
The 18 was (deliberately?) misleading.
Some of us weren't misled at all. In fact at least one of us thought
"Ooh, that's clever!"
Why do you people waste your time engaging with him?
It's summer and there's nothing on the telly!
Tony Cooper
2018-07-08 23:53:50 UTC
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On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 16:04:17 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by John Varela
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 20:49:09 UTC, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'.
That's why I suggested sesquianniversary for 18 months. Wasn't that obvious?
No. Anniversaries aren't counted in months, but in years.
And year-and-a-half observations hadn't been mentioned. Celebrating the
sesquianniversary of 1 January 2018 on 1 July 2019 seems rather silly.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
18 months = one and a half years! "anni" are years.
The 18 was (deliberately?) misleading.
Some of us weren't misled at all. In fact at least one of us thought
"Ooh, that's clever!"
Why do you people waste your time engaging with him?
It's summer and there's nothing on the telly!
Ahhh, but we (in this area) have new episodes of "Endeavor" and "The
Tunnel" to watch tonight.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-09 04:28:27 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 16:04:17 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by John Varela
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 20:49:09 UTC, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'.
That's why I suggested sesquianniversary for 18 months. Wasn't that obvious?
No. Anniversaries aren't counted in months, but in years.
And year-and-a-half observations hadn't been mentioned. Celebrating the
sesquianniversary of 1 January 2018 on 1 July 2019 seems rather silly.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
18 months = one and a half years! "anni" are years.
The 18 was (deliberately?) misleading.
Some of us weren't misled at all. In fact at least one of us thought
"Ooh, that's clever!"
Why do you people waste your time engaging with him?
It's summer and there's nothing on the telly!
Ahhh, but we (in this area) have new episodes of "Endeavor" and "The
Tunnel" to watch tonight.
Whereas _we_ watched *the 39 Steps* this evening, on City Cinemathèque.
the Omrud
2018-07-09 08:13:26 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 16:04:17 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by John Varela
Why do you people waste your time engaging with him?
It's summer and there's nothing on the telly!
Ahhh, but we (in this area) have new episodes of "Endeavor" and "The
Tunnel" to watch tonight.
We've got Hidden, but about half the dialogue is in Welsh so I suspect
it may not get exported.
--
David
J. J. Lodder
2018-07-09 08:43:19 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 16:04:17 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by John Varela
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 20:49:09 UTC, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for
longer than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's
Day". It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could
dream up something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how
about semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for
18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'.
That's why I suggested sesquianniversary for 18 months. Wasn't that obvious?
No. Anniversaries aren't counted in months, but in years.
And year-and-a-half observations hadn't been mentioned. Celebrating the
sesquianniversary of 1 January 2018 on 1 July 2019 seems rather silly.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
18 months = one and a half years! "anni" are years.
The 18 was (deliberately?) misleading.
Some of us weren't misled at all. In fact at least one of us thought
"Ooh, that's clever!"
Why do you people waste your time engaging with him?
It's summer and there's nothing on the telly!
Ahhh, but we (in this area) have new episodes of "Endeavor" and "The
Tunnel" to watch tonight.
It's 'Beck' over here, that is Martin Beck.
Instead of disappearing after the ten Sjowall & Wahloo books
(like he should have) he lived on forever in endless TV series,

Jan
RH Draney
2018-07-09 04:58:19 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by John Varela
Why do you people waste your time engaging with him?
It's summer and there's nothing on the telly!
And no SDC forthcoming, drat the luck....r
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-09 04:26:54 UTC
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Post by John Varela
On Sun, 8 Jul 2018 20:49:09 UTC, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'.
That's why I suggested sesquianniversary for 18 months. Wasn't that obvious?
No. Anniversaries aren't counted in months, but in years.
And year-and-a-half observations hadn't been mentioned. Celebrating the
sesquianniversary of 1 January 2018 on 1 July 2019 seems rather silly.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
18 months = one and a half years! "anni" are years.
The 18 was (deliberately?) misleading.
Some of us weren't misled at all. In fact at least one of us thought
"Ooh, that's clever!"
Why do you people waste your time engaging with him?
If you weren't afraid to read what he writes, you might find out.

You have now turned into one of those jackasses who comments on single
lines excerpted, out of context, from discussions. I've been quite happy
to ignore you for all these months when you said either ridiculous things
or exactly the same things I had said many hours earlier, but if you're
going to start doing this, watch out.
Anders D. Nygaard
2018-07-08 21:19:49 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'.
That's why I suggested sesquianniversary for 18 months. Wasn't that obvious?
Yes.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
 We regularly observe sesquicentennials of things
that happened 150 years ago.
We don't, but I recall Asimovs "Bicentennial man", where the protagonist
is celebrated as "Sesquicentennial robot".

/Anders, Denmark.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-09 04:24:31 UTC
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Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'.
That's why I suggested sesquianniversary for 18 months. Wasn't that obvious?
Yes.
What would you celebrate the sesquianniversary of? If a kid wants a half-
birthday when he turns 6 1/2, would the invitations say you're asked to
a sesquianniversary of his 5th birthday?
Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
 We regularly observe sesquicentennials of things
that happened 150 years ago.
We don't, but I recall Asimovs "Bicentennial man", where the protagonist
is celebrated as "Sesquicentennial robot".
The word appeared on many US postage stamps over the years, back when
postage stamps celebrated actual people and events and not things like
Disney Villains and Pollinators (those were quite pretty, though) and
Dragons (a set coming out next month, not even tied to either LotR or
GoT, unlike some recent British ones).
Pavel Svinchnik
2018-07-09 01:48:55 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'. We regularly observe sesquicentennials of things
that happened 150 years ago.
My daughter was born exactly six months after my birthday so she always celebrated her half-birthday on my birthday.


Paul
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-09 05:26:35 UTC
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Post by Pavel Svinchnik
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'. We regularly observe sesquicentennials of things
that happened 150 years ago.
My daughter was born exactly six months after my birthday so she always
celebrated her half-birthday on my birthday.
Come to think of it, my youngest daughter was born exactly four months
after my birthday. Nothing special about that, but it put her birthday
in August, when many of her friends would be away, so we often had
half-birthday parties for her in February.
--
athel
John Varela
2018-07-09 22:50:31 UTC
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Post by Pavel Svinchnik
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Thank you for the helpful reply. This has been going on for longer
than I had realised.
As you rightly say, no obvious word comes to mind as a direct
replacement. In the past we might have said something like
"On the first of July it will be six months since New Year's Day".
It would be nice if the combined brains of aue could dream up
something better.
I'm not convinced that we need such a word, but, if we do, how about
semianniversary for six months and sesquianniversary for 18?
Children lobby for celebrating their half-birthday.
Sesqui- means '1 1/2'. We regularly observe sesquicentennials of things
that happened 150 years ago.
My daughter was born exactly six months after my birthday so she always celebrated her half-birthday on my birthday.
Our #2 son was born on June 25, exactly six months from Christmas,
which as a boy he exulted in for its being the ideal spacing for
gift reception. Unlike his younger brother, who was born four days
after Christmas.
--
John Varela
s***@gmail.com
2018-07-09 23:00:35 UTC
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Post by John Varela
Post by Pavel Svinchnik
My daughter was born exactly six months after my birthday so she always celebrated her half-birthday on my birthday.
Our #2 son was born on June 25, exactly six months from Christmas,
which as a boy he exulted in for its being the ideal spacing for
gift reception. Unlike his younger brother, who was born four days
after Christmas.
Half my family has birthdays around the beginning of the year,
the half six months later.

/dps "half six, quarter dozen the other"
s***@gmail.com
2018-07-09 23:19:31 UTC
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Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by John Varela
Post by Pavel Svinchnik
My daughter was born exactly six months after my birthday so she always celebrated her half-birthday on my birthday.
Our #2 son was born on June 25, exactly six months from Christmas,
which as a boy he exulted in for its being the ideal spacing for
gift reception. Unlike his younger brother, who was born four days
after Christmas.
Half my family has birthdays around the beginning of the year,
the half six months later.
/dps "half six, quarter dozen the other"
I've typed better.

/dps

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