Discussion:
a dissipated, florid face
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tonbei
2018-01-12 18:29:11 UTC
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I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.

a middle-aged investigator with a dissipated, florid face
(The Body Farm by P. Cornwell)


question about: the meaning of "dissipated".
In such a descrition of someone's face, what could be meant by "dissipated"?


Oxford lists the following two definitions:
1.1 Disperse or scatter.
‘the cloud of smoke dissipated’
2. Waste or fritter away (money, energy, or resources)
‘he inherited, but then dissipated, his father's fortune’

My guess is: as his face is florid, he may have some fever. So, "dissipated" means
about fever tiring his face, or energy-lost complexion.
Jerry Friedman
2018-01-12 18:32:44 UTC
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Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
a middle-aged investigator with a dissipated, florid face
(The Body Farm by P. Cornwell)
question about: the meaning of "dissipated".
In such a descrition of someone's face, what could be meant by "dissipated"?
1.1 Disperse or scatter.
‘the cloud of smoke dissipated’
2. Waste or fritter away (money, energy, or resources)
‘he inherited, but then dissipated, his father's fortune’
My guess is: as his face is florid, he may have some fever. So, "dissipated" means
about fever tiring his face, or energy-lost complexion.
It means the face suggests dissipation, which means wasting one's
life through drunkenness. Applying "dissipated" to a face strikes me
as a bit unconventional.
--
Jerry Friedman
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-01-12 18:37:43 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
a middle-aged investigator with a dissipated, florid face
(The Body Farm by P. Cornwell)
question about: the meaning of "dissipated".
In such a descrition of someone's face, what could be meant by "dissipated"?
1.1 Disperse or scatter.
‘the cloud of smoke dissipated’
2. Waste or fritter away (money, energy, or resources)
‘he inherited, but then dissipated, his father's fortune’
My guess is: as his face is florid, he may have some fever. So, "dissipated" means
about fever tiring his face, or energy-lost complexion.
It means the face suggests dissipation, which means wasting one's
life through drunkenness. Applying "dissipated" to a face strikes me
as a bit unconventional.
Unconventional, yes, but easy enough to understand. A related sentence
that I've heard more than once is "he had a dissipated look about him".
--
athel
Tony Cooper
2018-01-12 20:34:19 UTC
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On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 10:32:44 -0800 (PST), Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
a middle-aged investigator with a dissipated, florid face
(The Body Farm by P. Cornwell)
question about: the meaning of "dissipated".
In such a descrition of someone's face, what could be meant by "dissipated"?
1.1 Disperse or scatter.
‘the cloud of smoke dissipated’
2. Waste or fritter away (money, energy, or resources)
‘he inherited, but then dissipated, his father's fortune’
My guess is: as his face is florid, he may have some fever. So, "dissipated" means
about fever tiring his face, or energy-lost complexion.
It means the face suggests dissipation, which means wasting one's
life through drunkenness. Applying "dissipated" to a face strikes me
as a bit unconventional.
Anyone who has watched "Shameless" on Showtime, and has seen the later
episodes with Alan Rosenberg as Prof Youans, will think of that face
as "dissipated".

Most photos of Rosenberg on the web show his good side. This comes
close to how bad he looks in the jail and court scenes, but doesn't
show how *bad* and dissipated he appears on screen.

http://www.imdb.com/title/tt6428796/mediaviewer/rm4227816448
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Cheryl
2018-01-12 18:41:59 UTC
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Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
a middle-aged investigator with a dissipated, florid face
(The Body Farm by P. Cornwell)
question about: the meaning of "dissipated".
In such a descrition of someone's face, what could be meant by "dissipated"?
1.1 Disperse or scatter.
‘the cloud of smoke dissipated’
2. Waste or fritter away (money, energy, or resources)
‘he inherited, but then dissipated, his father's fortune’
My guess is: as his face is florid, he may have some fever. So, "dissipated" means
about fever tiring his face, or energy-lost complexion.
It means his face is showing the results of a dissipated lifestyle -
that is, one with eating too much rich food and drinking too much
alcohol. "Dissipation" is related to meaning 1, to disperse or scatter,
which in this case means dispersing money on wild living -

"Overindulgence in sensual pleasures; dissipated living.
‘a descent into drunkenness and sexual dissipation’"
--
Cheryl
Janet
2018-01-12 19:30:18 UTC
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Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
a middle-aged investigator with a dissipated, florid face
(The Body Farm by P. Cornwell)
question about: the meaning of "dissipated".
In such a descrition of someone's face, what could be meant by "dissipated"?
https://dictionary.cambridge.org/dictionary/english/dissipated

"spending too much time enjoying physical pleasures and harmful
activities such as drinking a lot of alcohol:
He recalled his dissipated youth spent in nightclubs and bars."

the florid (red) face implies the same thing, a heavy drinker.

Janet.
tonbei
2018-01-12 23:04:27 UTC
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Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
a middle-aged investigator with a dissipated, florid face
(The Body Farm by P. Cornwell)
What made me post this question is that "florid" is associated to an image
of being well and healthy, or he has a good and healthy color of face.
So, "florid" and "dissipated" did not seem to fit one another.
But, if his red color in complexion comes from high pressure which might
have been caused by dissipated life, it makes sense.
Tony Cooper
2018-01-12 23:31:31 UTC
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Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
a middle-aged investigator with a dissipated, florid face
(The Body Farm by P. Cornwell)
What made me post this question is that "florid" is associated to an image
of being well and healthy, or he has a good and healthy color of face.
Not to me. "Florid" is excessive. Another sign of excessive drinking
is a bulbous nose and broken blood vessels in the nose. Medically,
rhinophyma. Excessive use of alcohol induces vasodilation and facial
flushing if rosacea is at all present.
Post by tonbei
So, "florid" and "dissipated" did not seem to fit one another.
But, if his red color in complexion comes from high pressure which might
have been caused by dissipated life, it makes sense.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Cheryl
2018-01-12 23:38:39 UTC
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On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 18:31:31 -0500, Tony Cooper
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 15:04:27 -0800 (PST), tonbei
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
a middle-aged investigator with a dissipated, florid face
(The Body Farm by P. Cornwell)
What made me post this question is that "florid" is associated to an image
of being well and healthy, or he has a good and healthy color of face.
Not to me. "Florid" is excessive. Another sign of excessive
drinking
is a bulbous nose and broken blood vessels in the nose. Medically,
rhinophyma. Excessive use of alcohol induces vasodilation and
facial
flushing if rosacea is at all present.
Post by tonbei
So, "florid" and "dissipated" did not seem to fit one another.
But, if his red color in complexion comes from high pressure which might
have been caused by dissipated life, it makes sense.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
I'd say 'florid' implies 'unhealthy'. This might be due to alcohol,
or to some other reason. If you want to say that someone has an
attractive and healthy appearance and a red complexion, you'd use
another word - perhaps 'ruddy' or something to do with suntan.
--
Cheryl
Dingbat
2018-01-13 05:42:40 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 18:31:31 -0500, Tony Cooper
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 15:04:27 -0800 (PST), tonbei
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
a middle-aged investigator with a dissipated, florid face
(The Body Farm by P. Cornwell)
What made me post this question is that "florid" is associated to
an image
Post by tonbei
of being well and healthy, or he has a good and healthy color of
face.
Not to me. "Florid" is excessive. Another sign of excessive
drinking
is a bulbous nose and broken blood vessels in the nose. Medically,
rhinophyma. Excessive use of alcohol induces vasodilation and
facial
flushing if rosacea is at all present.
Post by tonbei
So, "florid" and "dissipated" did not seem to fit one another.
But, if his red color in complexion comes from high pressure which
might
Post by tonbei
have been caused by dissipated life, it makes sense.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
I'd say 'florid' implies 'unhealthy'.
If "dissipated florid" is an unhealthy kind of florid as distinct from, say,
"tanned florid", a healthy kind of florid, then there should be no comma
after "dissipated".
Post by Cheryl
This might be due to alcohol,
or to some other reason. If you want to say that someone has an
attractive and healthy appearance and a red complexion, you'd use
another word - perhaps 'ruddy' or something to do with suntan.
--
Cheryl
Tony Cooper
2018-01-13 06:37:14 UTC
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On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 21:42:40 -0800 (PST), Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
Post by Cheryl
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 18:31:31 -0500, Tony Cooper
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 15:04:27 -0800 (PST), tonbei
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
a middle-aged investigator with a dissipated, florid face
(The Body Farm by P. Cornwell)
What made me post this question is that "florid" is associated to
an image
Post by tonbei
of being well and healthy, or he has a good and healthy color of
face.
Not to me. "Florid" is excessive. Another sign of excessive
drinking
is a bulbous nose and broken blood vessels in the nose. Medically,
rhinophyma. Excessive use of alcohol induces vasodilation and
facial
flushing if rosacea is at all present.
Post by tonbei
So, "florid" and "dissipated" did not seem to fit one another.
But, if his red color in complexion comes from high pressure which
might
Post by tonbei
have been caused by dissipated life, it makes sense.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
I'd say 'florid' implies 'unhealthy'.
If "dissipated florid" is an unhealthy kind of florid as distinct from, say,
"tanned florid", a healthy kind of florid, then there should be no comma
after "dissipated".
Nah. Two different things. The dissipated face is one that shows the
effects of hard living. The florid complexion may also be the result
of hard living, but hard living doesn't necessarily result in both.
The comma indicates that both conditions are present.

I don't think there is a florid that is healthy. If the complexion is
red or reddish, and the person is healthy, "florid" would not be used
to describe the look. As pointed out below, "ruddy", "flushed", or
some other word would be used.

A red or reddish face may be caused by rosacea, but that's an
unhealthy condition. It may not be the result of hard living.
Post by Dingbat
Post by Cheryl
This might be due to alcohol,
or to some other reason. If you want to say that someone has an
attractive and healthy appearance and a red complexion, you'd use
another word - perhaps 'ruddy' or something to do with suntan.
--
Cheryl
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Sam Plusnet
2018-01-20 18:22:58 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 21:42:40 -0800 (PST), Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
Post by Cheryl
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 18:31:31 -0500, Tony Cooper
On Fri, 12 Jan 2018 15:04:27 -0800 (PST), tonbei
Post by tonbei
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
a middle-aged investigator with a dissipated, florid face
(The Body Farm by P. Cornwell)
What made me post this question is that "florid" is associated to
an image
Post by tonbei
of being well and healthy, or he has a good and healthy color of
face.
Not to me. "Florid" is excessive. Another sign of excessive
drinking
is a bulbous nose and broken blood vessels in the nose. Medically,
rhinophyma. Excessive use of alcohol induces vasodilation and
facial
flushing if rosacea is at all present.
Post by tonbei
So, "florid" and "dissipated" did not seem to fit one another.
But, if his red color in complexion comes from high pressure which
might
Post by tonbei
have been caused by dissipated life, it makes sense.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
I'd say 'florid' implies 'unhealthy'.
If "dissipated florid" is an unhealthy kind of florid as distinct from, say,
"tanned florid", a healthy kind of florid, then there should be no comma
after "dissipated".
Nah. Two different things. The dissipated face is one that shows the
effects of hard living. The florid complexion may also be the result
of hard living, but hard living doesn't necessarily result in both.
The comma indicates that both conditions are present.
I don't think there is a florid that is healthy. If the complexion is
red or reddish, and the person is healthy, "florid" would not be used
to describe the look. As pointed out below, "ruddy", "flushed", or
some other word would be used.
A red or reddish face may be caused by rosacea, but that's an
unhealthy condition. It may not be the result of hard living.
Post by Dingbat
Post by Cheryl
This might be due to alcohol,
or to some other reason. If you want to say that someone has an
attractive and healthy appearance and a red complexion, you'd use
another word - perhaps 'ruddy' or something to do with suntan.
I came across this thread some time after it had run its course.

Wouldn't a simpler way of explaining the terms "florid" and "dissapated"
be to point to a photograph of Steve Banon?
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter T. Daniels
2018-01-21 13:43:05 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
I came across this thread some time after it had run its course.
Wouldn't a simpler way of explaining the terms "florid" and "dissapated"
be to point to a photograph of Steve Banon?
Not if anyone could help it.

SNL depicted him as a Grim Reaper. Even they couldn't stand to put Bannon makeup
on an actor.

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