Discussion:
staying quit
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Lebowski
2017-04-18 21:05:09 UTC
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(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.

I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."

Thank you. Cheers.
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-18 21:30:02 UTC
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Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
Maybe that's because when past participles are used as adjectives,
they're usually transitive verbs modifying the patient of the
action. Here "quit" modifies the agent. (Too bad you can't
say *"Smoking won't stay quit." Do that and other things, such as the
nonexistence of *"Smoking was quit," mean that "smoking" isn't
the direct object there?)
--
Jerry Friedman
David Kleinecke
2017-04-18 22:57:06 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
Maybe that's because when past participles are used as adjectives,
they're usually transitive verbs modifying the patient of the
action. Here "quit" modifies the agent. (Too bad you can't
say *"Smoking won't stay quit." Do that and other things, such as the
nonexistence of *"Smoking was quit," mean that "smoking" isn't
the direct object there?)
Consider:

The choice was between smoking and drinking. After a pause
smoking was quit.

More likely one would say:

The choice was between smoking and drinking. After a pause
they quit smoking.

Are we to assume "quit" does not form passives? If so -
any more examples?
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-19 18:01:45 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
Maybe that's because when past participles are used as adjectives,
they're usually transitive verbs modifying the patient of the
action. Here "quit" modifies the agent. (Too bad you can't
say *"Smoking won't stay quit." Do that and other things, such as the
nonexistence of *"Smoking was quit," mean that "smoking" isn't
the direct object there?)
The choice was between smoking and drinking. After a pause
smoking was quit.
The choice was between smoking and drinking. After a pause
they quit smoking.
Are we to assume "quit" does not form passives? If so -
any more examples?
He quit that job.

?That job was quit. ?That job has been quit by about ten people so
far.

There are only two passive "quit"s at COCA. One is from /Psychology Today/:

"These impulsive acts often result from an aim that plays a central role in
most of the psychopath's behavior: to achieve immediate satisfaction,
pleasure, or relief. So family members, relatives, employers, and
coworkers typically find themselves standing around asking themselves
what happened -- jobs are quit, relationships broken off, plans changed,
houses ransacked, people hurt, often for what appears as little more than
a whim."

The other is by Karl S. Zimmerer in /Geographical Review/:

"Pressures promoting the local completeness of cultivar loss have stemmed
from the organization of the agropastoral economy. Increased livestock
grazing on parcels where native crops were quit has pressured remaining
producers nearby to cease cultivation."

There are a few Google hits on "quit the crop", "quit that crop", not
all about tobacco. (I was wondering whether he was a native speaker
of English.)

Here's an oddity:

"For example, banning smoking in one's home can greatly increase the
chances of successfully quitting smoking. The presence of a complete ban
on smoking in one's home is associated with *being quit* for at least 90
days and with being a former smoker."
--
Jerry Friedman
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-19 18:03:10 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
Maybe that's because when past participles are used as adjectives,
they're usually transitive verbs modifying the patient of the
action. Here "quit" modifies the agent. (Too bad you can't
say *"Smoking won't stay quit." Do that and other things, such as the
nonexistence of *"Smoking was quit," mean that "smoking" isn't
the direct object there?)
The choice was between smoking and drinking. After a pause
smoking was quit.
The choice was between smoking and drinking. After a pause
they quit smoking.
Are we to assume "quit" does not form passives? If so -
any more examples?
...
Post by Jerry Friedman
"For example, banning smoking in one's home can greatly increase the
chances of successfully quitting smoking. The presence of a complete ban
on smoking in one's home is associated with *being quit* for at least 90
days and with being a former smoker."
Emphasis added. Come to think of it, that's parallel to grammarian's
examples.
--
Jerry Friedman
Mark Brader
2017-04-19 18:23:20 UTC
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During the play of bridge and related games, the cards are played in groups
called "tricks". Each trick consists of one card from each player's hand.
When the players are ready to proceed to the next trick, the cards are
turned face down on the table. They are then called "quitted tricks".
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "group this in post-top usually don't we"
***@vex.net | -- Mike Lyle

My text in this article is in the public domain.
David Kleinecke
2017-04-19 21:40:25 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
Maybe that's because when past participles are used as adjectives,
they're usually transitive verbs modifying the patient of the
action. Here "quit" modifies the agent. (Too bad you can't
say *"Smoking won't stay quit." Do that and other things, such as the
nonexistence of *"Smoking was quit," mean that "smoking" isn't
the direct object there?)
The choice was between smoking and drinking. After a pause
smoking was quit.
The choice was between smoking and drinking. After a pause
they quit smoking.
Are we to assume "quit" does not form passives? If so -
any more examples?
He quit that job.
?That job was quit. ?That job has been quit by about ten people so
far.
"These impulsive acts often result from an aim that plays a central role in
most of the psychopath's behavior: to achieve immediate satisfaction,
pleasure, or relief. So family members, relatives, employers, and
coworkers typically find themselves standing around asking themselves
what happened -- jobs are quit, relationships broken off, plans changed,
houses ransacked, people hurt, often for what appears as little more than
a whim."
I like that. It seems a grammatically perfect example of a very
rare construction. Re-enforcing once again the rule of thumb that,
in English at least, one should not assume too last that some
construction never occurs.
Robert Bannister
2017-04-23 23:32:36 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
Maybe that's because when past participles are used as adjectives,
they're usually transitive verbs modifying the patient of the
action. Here "quit" modifies the agent. (Too bad you can't
say *"Smoking won't stay quit." Do that and other things, such as the
nonexistence of *"Smoking was quit," mean that "smoking" isn't
the direct object there?)
The choice was between smoking and drinking. After a pause
smoking was quit.
The choice was between smoking and drinking. After a pause
they quit smoking.
Are we to assume "quit" does not form passives? If so -
any more examples?
I think I could say "The house was quitted before the bodies were
discovered", but not using the "give up" meaning of "quit".
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
Lebowski
2017-04-24 16:16:19 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
Maybe that's because when past participles are used as adjectives,
they're usually transitive verbs modifying the patient of the
action. Here "quit" modifies the agent. (Too bad you can't
say *"Smoking won't stay quit." Do that and other things, such as the
nonexistence of *"Smoking was quit," mean that "smoking" isn't
the direct object there?)
--
Jerry Friedman
My thanks to everyone for all the great replies. This first
one, with its application of semantic roles to the topic, has
been especially interesting for me to ponder. I also like the
discussion of the possibility of a passive.

I don't think "smoking" is a direct object in "He quit smoking."
Mustn't it be interpreted as some kind of nonfinite clause?
Consider that we can give "smoking" itself a direct object. In
"He quit smoking pot," pot is what he quit smoking.

Assuming "quit" is an adjective (or a past participle with strong
adjectival force) in "stay quit," I wonder if it can be complemented
by an "of"-phrase. Even though I've never used such sentences, I
seem to be able to say, "I am quit of smoking."

That sentence actually seems to me to be an archaic use of the
"be"-perfect, except that we wouldn't use "of" with "have." The
sentence "I am quit of smoking" implies (I think) "I have quit
smoking," not *"I have quit of smoking," which is ridiculous.

Does a sentence like "I am quit of smoking" work for you guys?
David Kleinecke
2017-04-24 17:45:53 UTC
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Post by Lebowski
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
Maybe that's because when past participles are used as adjectives,
they're usually transitive verbs modifying the patient of the
action. Here "quit" modifies the agent. (Too bad you can't
say *"Smoking won't stay quit." Do that and other things, such as the
nonexistence of *"Smoking was quit," mean that "smoking" isn't
the direct object there?)
--
Jerry Friedman
My thanks to everyone for all the great replies. This first
one, with its application of semantic roles to the topic, has
been especially interesting for me to ponder. I also like the
discussion of the possibility of a passive.
I don't think "smoking" is a direct object in "He quit smoking."
Mustn't it be interpreted as some kind of nonfinite clause?
Consider that we can give "smoking" itself a direct object. In
"He quit smoking pot," pot is what he quit smoking.
Assuming "quit" is an adjective (or a past participle with strong
adjectival force) in "stay quit," I wonder if it can be complemented
by an "of"-phrase. Even though I've never used such sentences, I
seem to be able to say, "I am quit of smoking."
That sentence actually seems to me to be an archaic use of the
"be"-perfect, except that we wouldn't use "of" with "have." The
sentence "I am quit of smoking" implies (I think) "I have quit
smoking," not *"I have quit of smoking," which is ridiculous.
Does a sentence like "I am quit of smoking" work for you guys?
Not quite "quit" but I might say "I got shut of coffin nails".
g***@gmail.com
2017-04-24 21:43:14 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Lebowski
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
Maybe that's because when past participles are used as adjectives,
they're usually transitive verbs modifying the patient of the
action. Here "quit" modifies the agent. (Too bad you can't
say *"Smoking won't stay quit." Do that and other things, such as the
nonexistence of *"Smoking was quit," mean that "smoking" isn't
the direct object there?)
--
Jerry Friedman
My thanks to everyone for all the great replies. This first
one, with its application of semantic roles to the topic, has
been especially interesting for me to ponder. I also like the
discussion of the possibility of a passive.
I don't think "smoking" is a direct object in "He quit smoking."
Mustn't it be interpreted as some kind of nonfinite clause?
Consider that we can give "smoking" itself a direct object. In
"He quit smoking pot," pot is what he quit smoking.
Assuming "quit" is an adjective (or a past participle with strong
adjectival force) in "stay quit," I wonder if it can be complemented
by an "of"-phrase. Even though I've never used such sentences, I
seem to be able to say, "I am quit of smoking."
That sentence actually seems to me to be an archaic use of the
"be"-perfect, except that we wouldn't use "of" with "have." The
sentence "I am quit of smoking" implies (I think) "I have quit
smoking," not *"I have quit of smoking," which is ridiculous.
Does a sentence like "I am quit of smoking" work for you guys?
Not quite "quit" but I might say "I got shut of coffin nails".
I found this example at COCA. I wonder whether, if she achieves
her desire to _be quit of_ managing those things, it will follow
that she (a) has quit managing them and (b) stayed quit.

"She wants to be quit of managing Father's household and us,
especially now that he is to marry Lord Pompous's cousin,
Lady Clendenen."

https://books.google.com/books?id=5AjLZGTOI1AC&pg=PT13&lpg=PT13&dq=%22She+wants+to+be+quit+of+managing+Father's+household+and+us%22&source=bl&ots=LAw7HWERjZ&sig=UxW6VVJQXGAVCG7gcONeDxfgcyk&hl=en&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwj5mNaihr7TAhUV8GMKHbtjCTQQ6AEIIzAA#v=onepage&q=%22She%20wants%20to%20be%20quit%20of%20managing%20Father's%20household%20and%20us%22&f=false
Harrison Hill
2017-04-18 21:34:15 UTC
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Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
These are variations on a normal, informal usage.

4) When you quit smoking, make sure you stay quit.

Meaning: "When you stop make sure you stay stopped".
q***@yahoo.com
2017-04-18 21:45:32 UTC
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On Tue, 18 Apr 2017 14:05:09 -0700 (PDT), Lebowski
Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Maybe the second 'quit' is based on another definition of the word-
adj. Absolved of a duty or an obligation; free. (AHD).
--
John
James Wilkinson Sword
2017-04-19 19:16:29 UTC
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Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
It sounds wrong to me and I'd say "stayed clean".
--
A bleached blonde and a natural blonde were on top of the Empire State Building.
How do you tell them apart?
The bleached blonde would never throw bread to the helicopters.
The Peeler
2017-04-19 19:34:36 UTC
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On Wed, 19 Apr 2017 20:16:29 +0100, Birdbrain Macaw (now "James Wilkinson"),
Post by James Wilkinson Sword
It sounds wrong to me
Get real, Birdbrain, everything you say sounds wrong to everyone, except to
yourself!
--
AndyW addressing Birdbrain:
"Troll or idiot?...
You have been presented with a viewpoint with information, reasoning,
historical cases, citations and references to back it up and wilfully
ignore all going back to your idea which has no supporting information."
MID: <KaToA.263621$***@fx10.am4>
Robert Bannister
2017-04-23 23:30:58 UTC
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Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
I'm glad to say I had never come across "quit" used as an adjective
before today.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
Janet
2017-04-24 09:40:26 UTC
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In article <***@mid.individual.net>, ***@clubtelco.com
says...
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
I'm glad to say I had never come across "quit" used as an adjective
before today.
How about quits, as in "I paid for lunch, you paid for the drinks,
we're quits."

Janet
Peter Moylan
2017-04-24 15:38:55 UTC
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Post by Janet
says...
Post by Robert Bannister
I'm glad to say I had never come across "quit" used as an adjective
before today.
How about quits, as in "I paid for lunch, you paid for the drinks,
we're quits."
I would say "we're quit". That's probably an adjective.

This weekend just past my wife and I went to Sydney for a concert, and
quite by accident we also ended up in a performance of a play. She paid
for the entertainment, I paid for the meals and a few miscellanea ... I
have no idea how it balanced out, but I ended up saying "you don't owe
me anything". I don't think we ever used the word "quit".
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-24 15:47:50 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Janet
says...
Post by Robert Bannister
I'm glad to say I had never come across "quit" used as an adjective
before today.
How about quits, as in "I paid for lunch, you paid for the drinks,
we're quits."
I would say "we're quit". That's probably an adjective.
This weekend just past my wife and I went to Sydney for a concert, and
quite by accident we also ended up in a performance of a play. She paid
for the entertainment, I paid for the meals and a few miscellanea ... I
have no idea how it balanced out, but I ended up saying "you don't owe
me anything". I don't think we ever used the word "quit".
"You are too much for me Ennis, you sonofawhoreson bitch! I wish I knew how to quit you."
(*Brokeback Mountain*)
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-24 17:40:19 UTC
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Post by Janet
says...
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
I'm glad to say I had never come across "quit" used as an adjective
before today.
How about quits, as in "I paid for lunch, you paid for the drinks,
we're quits."
Janet
In the 1970s I was working at Queen's University Belfast in the Computer
Centre (CC) that provided central computing for use by the academic
departments of the whole university. Our responsibilities expanded and
we needed to rename our department. There were discussions within the CC
and with senior management of the university. The final decision was to
call the department "Computing Services".

However, en route to that decision I submitted a written proposal to a
meeting held to discuss the matter.

It was brief. The body text was:

Let's call it QUITS:
Queen's University Information Technology Services
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Janet
2017-04-25 09:56:43 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Janet
says...
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
I'm glad to say I had never come across "quit" used as an adjective
before today.
How about quits, as in "I paid for lunch, you paid for the drinks,
we're quits."
Janet
In the 1970s I was working at Queen's University Belfast in the Computer
Centre (CC) that provided central computing for use by the academic
departments of the whole university. Our responsibilities expanded and
we needed to rename our department. There were discussions within the CC
and with senior management of the university. The final decision was to
call the department "Computing Services".
However, en route to that decision I submitted a written proposal to a
meeting held to discuss the matter.
Queen's University Information Technology Services
so, did they? Or were the staff worried about being known as
quitters.

Janet
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-25 15:45:20 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Janet
says...
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
I'm glad to say I had never come across "quit" used as an adjective
before today.
How about quits, as in "I paid for lunch, you paid for the drinks,
we're quits."
Janet
In the 1970s I was working at Queen's University Belfast in the Computer
Centre (CC) that provided central computing for use by the academic
departments of the whole university. Our responsibilities expanded and
we needed to rename our department. There were discussions within the CC
and with senior management of the university. The final decision was to
call the department "Computing Services".
However, en route to that decision I submitted a written proposal to a
meeting held to discuss the matter.
Queen's University Information Technology Services
so, did they? Or were the staff worried about being known as
quitters.
Janet
There were certainly worries about that and other jokes.

The name chosen was "Computing Services". Some years later that was
merged with the University Library to form "Information Services".
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Janet
2017-04-25 20:04:26 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Janet
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Post by Robert Bannister
Post by Lebowski
(1) When you quit smoking, make sure to stay quit.
(2) He quits smoking annually, but never stays quit.
(3) No matter how hard he tries, he can't stay quit.
I'm OK with such sentences, but they tend to tickle me. There
is the sense that they are somehow illegitimate, that is, that
their use of "quit" as a (what shall we say?) participial
adjective is illegitimate. Is it? Incidentally, my question
would be the same if "quit" were changed to "stopped" and if
"stay" were changed to "remain."
Thank you. Cheers.
I'm glad to say I had never come across "quit" used as an adjective
before today.
How about quits, as in "I paid for lunch, you paid for the drinks,
we're quits."
Janet
In the 1970s I was working at Queen's University Belfast in the Computer
Centre (CC) that provided central computing for use by the academic
departments of the whole university. Our responsibilities expanded and
we needed to rename our department. There were discussions within the CC
and with senior management of the university. The final decision was to
call the department "Computing Services".
However, en route to that decision I submitted a written proposal to a
meeting held to discuss the matter.
Queen's University Information Technology Services
so, did they? Or were the staff worried about being known as
quitters.
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