Discussion:
'Bio' vs 'Organic'
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occam
2017-05-15 12:26:33 UTC
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In a recent chat with a BrE friend I mentioned a certain brand of food
which I described as 'bio'. She drew a blank. I had to explain that this
is short for organic foodstuff ('biologique') in Continental Europe.

It struck me that neither word (organic, biologique) is an accurate
description of colouring-flavouring-additive-free foodstuff it attempts
to describe. (Inorganic pizza anyone?)

'Wholefoods' are not additive-free necessarily. What would be a good
word to describe 'bio' food? (You score double if the word has a French
origin, thus recognisable in French and English.)
Janet
2017-05-15 12:54:51 UTC
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Post by occam
In a recent chat with a BrE friend I mentioned a certain brand of food
which I described as 'bio'. She drew a blank. I had to explain that this
is short for organic foodstuff ('biologique') in Continental Europe.
It's well known here, there are umpteen "bio" yoghurts and drinks
on UK supermarket shelves
Post by occam
It struck me that neither word (organic, biologique) is an accurate
description of colouring-flavouring-additive-free foodstuff it attempts
to describe. (Inorganic pizza anyone?)
'Wholefoods' are not additive-free necessarily. What would be a good
word to describe 'bio' food? (You score double if the word has a French
origin, thus recognisable in French and English.)
Labelling legislation in UK

https://www.gov.uk/guidance/organic-food-labelling-rules

Janet
Harrison Hill
2017-05-15 14:46:29 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by occam
In a recent chat with a BrE friend I mentioned a certain brand of food
which I described as 'bio'. She drew a blank. I had to explain that this
is short for organic foodstuff ('biologique') in Continental Europe.
It's well known here, there are umpteen "bio" yoghurts and drinks
on UK supermarket shelves
...and nearly all of them have nothing whatsoever to do
with being "organic" - per your link.

<https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=bio+yogurt+tesco&safe=off&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiskJmhkfLTAhWCK8AKHf1vAHEQ_AUIBygC&biw=1183&bih=530>
Post by Janet
Post by occam
It struck me that neither word (organic, biologique) is an accurate
description of colouring-flavouring-additive-free foodstuff it attempts
to describe. (Inorganic pizza anyone?)
You've missed "GM" off your list of things "omitted" :)
Post by Janet
Post by occam
'Wholefoods' are not additive-free necessarily. What would be a good
word to describe 'bio' food? (You score double if the word has a French
origin, thus recognisable in French and English.)
Labelling legislation in UK
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/organic-food-labelling-rules
Janet
Harrison Hill
2017-05-15 15:34:35 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
Post by occam
In a recent chat with a BrE friend I mentioned a certain brand of food
which I described as 'bio'. She drew a blank. I had to explain that this
is short for organic foodstuff ('biologique') in Continental Europe.
It's well known here, there are umpteen "bio" yoghurts and drinks
on UK supermarket shelves
...and nearly all of them have nothing whatsoever to do
with being "organic" - per your link.
<https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=bio+yogurt+tesco&safe=off&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiskJmhkfLTAhWCK8AKHf1vAHEQ_AUIBygC&biw=1183&bih=530>
Post by Janet
Post by occam
It struck me that neither word (organic, biologique) is an accurate
description of colouring-flavouring-additive-free foodstuff it attempts
to describe. (Inorganic pizza anyone?)
You've missed "GM" off your list of things "omitted" :)
Post by Janet
Post by occam
'Wholefoods' are not additive-free necessarily. What would be a good
word to describe 'bio' food? (You score double if the word has a French
origin, thus recognisable in French and English.)
Labelling legislation in UK
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/organic-food-labelling-rules
Janet
So "bio" in BrE seems to mean: in a yoghurt:
1) "made with bio culture"
2) "made with bio-live cultures"

Proving that beer is good for you :)

In a margarine: cholesterol-lowering.
In a detergent: good for rivers.

So they are the things that are good for you at
the moment, but when we look back on them will prove
to have been the worst choices.

Bio-diesel:
Chop down the world's forests to grow palm oil.

Bio-mass power station:
Ship what is left of the world's forests across
the world - using fossil fuel at that - to save
the planet.
Mack A. Damia
2017-05-15 15:48:49 UTC
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"Brill film, if you note in the film sometimes it's 4x2 other
times 4x4".

A WWII film with a cool drink to finish it off. Anyone?
Harrison Hill
2017-05-15 17:02:03 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
"Brill film, if you note in the film sometimes it's 4x2 other
times 4x4".
A WWII film with a cool drink to finish it off. Anyone?
"Ice-Cold in Alex", as you say :)
Mack A. Damia
2017-05-15 17:22:12 UTC
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On Mon, 15 May 2017 10:02:03 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Brill film, if you note in the film sometimes it's 4x2 other
times 4x4".
A WWII film with a cool drink to finish it off. Anyone?
"Ice-Cold in Alex", as you say :)
Thanks, nice to close the gestalt.
Lewis
2017-05-16 04:21:48 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
Post by occam
In a recent chat with a BrE friend I mentioned a certain brand of food
which I described as 'bio'. She drew a blank. I had to explain that this
is short for organic foodstuff ('biologique') in Continental Europe.
It's well known here, there are umpteen "bio" yoghurts and drinks
on UK supermarket shelves
...and nearly all of them have nothing whatsoever to do
with being "organic" - per your link.
<https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=bio+yogurt+tesco&safe=off&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiskJmhkfLTAhWCK8AKHf1vAHEQ_AUIBygC&biw=1183&bih=530>
Post by Janet
Post by occam
It struck me that neither word (organic, biologique) is an accurate
description of colouring-flavouring-additive-free foodstuff it attempts
to describe. (Inorganic pizza anyone?)
You've missed "GM" off your list of things "omitted" :)
As it should be. Unless you are eating exclusively wild game, all the
food you eat is GM.
--
I'm dangerous when I know what I'm doing.
Harrison Hill
2017-05-16 07:14:34 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
Post by occam
In a recent chat with a BrE friend I mentioned a certain brand of food
which I described as 'bio'. She drew a blank. I had to explain that this
is short for organic foodstuff ('biologique') in Continental Europe.
It's well known here, there are umpteen "bio" yoghurts and drinks
on UK supermarket shelves
...and nearly all of them have nothing whatsoever to do
with being "organic" - per your link.
<https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=bio+yogurt+tesco&safe=off&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiskJmhkfLTAhWCK8AKHf1vAHEQ_AUIBygC&biw=1183&bih=530>
Post by Janet
Post by occam
It struck me that neither word (organic, biologique) is an accurate
description of colouring-flavouring-additive-free foodstuff it attempts
to describe. (Inorganic pizza anyone?)
You've missed "GM" off your list of things "omitted" :)
As it should be. Unless you are eating exclusively wild game, all the
food you eat is GM.
Why are you ruling out all the food you *don't* eat?
How is "wild game" different to farm bred meat in your
distinction? What about crops and flowers and bees and honey?

You know as well as I do what "GM" means.

"In 1998 we became the worlds first national food retailer to ban
genetically modified (GM) ingredients from our own products".

https://www.iceland.co.uk/our-food/our-food-story/
occam
2017-05-16 07:47:42 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Lewis
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Janet
Post by occam
In a recent chat with a BrE friend I mentioned a certain brand of food
which I described as 'bio'. She drew a blank. I had to explain that this
is short for organic foodstuff ('biologique') in Continental Europe.
It's well known here, there are umpteen "bio" yoghurts and drinks
on UK supermarket shelves
...and nearly all of them have nothing whatsoever to do
with being "organic" - per your link.
<https://www.google.co.uk/search?q=bio+yogurt+tesco&safe=off&source=lnms&tbm=isch&sa=X&ved=0ahUKEwiskJmhkfLTAhWCK8AKHf1vAHEQ_AUIBygC&biw=1183&bih=530>
Post by Janet
Post by occam
It struck me that neither word (organic, biologique) is an accurate
description of colouring-flavouring-additive-free foodstuff it attempts
to describe. (Inorganic pizza anyone?)
You've missed "GM" off your list of things "omitted" :)
As it should be. Unless you are eating exclusively wild game, all the
food you eat is GM.
Why are you ruling out all the food you *don't* eat?
How is "wild game" different to farm bred meat in your
distinction? What about crops and flowers and bees and honey?
You know as well as I do what "GM" means.
GM stands for 'Genetically Modified'. In this sense it suffers from the
same problem as 'organic'. All life forms are genetically modified in
some form or another in their long journey from creation to the present.
I think what is implicitly taken as read in 'GM' is that it is
Genetically-Engineered-By-Humans-in-Labs. Lewis' point stands, and I'd
even include "wild game" in the definition.
Peter Moylan
2017-05-16 17:24:55 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Lewis
As it should be. Unless you are eating exclusively wild game, all the
food you eat is GM.
Why are you ruling out all the food you *don't* eat?
How is "wild game" different to farm bred meat in your
distinction? What about crops and flowers and bees and honey?
You know as well as I do what "GM" means.
What about wheat, to choose an obvious example? The non-GM version,
commonly known as "grass seed", can't be found in the supermarkets
because nobody likes the taste. It took many generations of selective
breeding to produce the variety that we now use for making bread, among
other uses.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Harrison Hill
2017-05-16 17:42:36 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Lewis
As it should be. Unless you are eating exclusively wild game, all the
food you eat is GM.
Why are you ruling out all the food you *don't* eat?
How is "wild game" different to farm bred meat in your
distinction? What about crops and flowers and bees and honey?
You know as well as I do what "GM" means.
What about wheat, to choose an obvious example? The non-GM version,
commonly known as "grass seed", can't be found in the supermarkets
because nobody likes the taste. It took many generations of selective
breeding to produce the variety that we now use for making bread, among
other uses.
In BrE "GM" means "engineered genetically, patented". Most UK
supermarkets (rightly or wrongly) distance themselves from it
It also has the suggestion of "chemical", "toxic".

Peter Moylan
2017-05-16 05:39:49 UTC
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Post by occam
In a recent chat with a BrE friend I mentioned a certain brand of food
which I described as 'bio'. She drew a blank. I had to explain that this
is short for organic foodstuff ('biologique') in Continental Europe.
It struck me that neither word (organic, biologique) is an accurate
description of colouring-flavouring-additive-free foodstuff it attempts
to describe. (Inorganic pizza anyone?)
'Wholefoods' are not additive-free necessarily. What would be a good
word to describe 'bio' food? (You score double if the word has a French
origin, thus recognisable in French and English.)
"Pure" works in both languages.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
CDB
2017-05-16 12:32:16 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
In a recent chat with a BrE friend I mentioned a certain brand of
food which I described as 'bio'. She drew a blank. I had to explain
that this is short for organic foodstuff ('biologique') in
Continental Europe.
It struck me that neither word (organic, biologique) is an
accurate description of colouring-flavouring-additive-free
foodstuff it attempts to describe. (Inorganic pizza anyone?)
'Wholefoods' are not additive-free necessarily. What would be a
good word to describe 'bio' food? (You score double if the word has
a French origin, thus recognisable in French and English.)
"Pure" works in both languages.
Or "real".

Best dietary rule I've seen is

1. Eat real food,
2. Not too much,
3. Mostly from plants;

(I think the framers of that rule defined "real food" as
"something your grandmother would have agreed was food". Maybe by now
that would have to be "great-grandmother" for most people.)
Pierre Jelenc
2017-05-16 06:20:41 UTC
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Post by occam
'Wholefoods' are not additive-free necessarily. What would be a good
word to describe 'bio' food? (You score double if the word has a French
origin, thus recognisable in French and English.)
A la mode.

Pierre
--
Pierre Jelenc
The Gigometer www.gigometer.com
The NYC Beer Guide www.nycbeer.org
occam
2017-05-16 08:04:37 UTC
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Post by Pierre Jelenc
Post by occam
'Wholefoods' are not additive-free necessarily. What would be a good
word to describe 'bio' food? (You score double if the word has a French
origin, thus recognisable in French and English.)
A la mode.
:-). Do you mind dropping my wife a note to that effect?
Peter Moylan
2017-05-16 17:27:44 UTC
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Post by Pierre Jelenc
Post by occam
'Wholefoods' are not additive-free necessarily. What would be a good
word to describe 'bio' food? (You score double if the word has a French
origin, thus recognisable in French and English.)
A la mode.
We have been told that in some countries that means "with ice cream".
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Harrison Hill
2017-05-16 07:07:58 UTC
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Post by occam
In a recent chat with a BrE friend I mentioned a certain brand of food
which I described as 'bio'. She drew a blank. I had to explain that this
is short for organic foodstuff ('biologique') in Continental Europe.
It struck me that neither word (organic, biologique) is an accurate
description of colouring-flavouring-additive-free foodstuff it attempts
to describe. (Inorganic pizza anyone?)
'Wholefoods' are not additive-free necessarily. What would be a good
word to describe 'bio' food? (You score double if the word has a French
origin, thus recognisable in French and English.)
More a phrase than a word, but what they use on eau is:

"au naturel".
Janet
2017-05-16 13:22:20 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by occam
In a recent chat with a BrE friend I mentioned a certain brand of food
which I described as 'bio'. She drew a blank. I had to explain that this
is short for organic foodstuff ('biologique') in Continental Europe.
It struck me that neither word (organic, biologique) is an accurate
description of colouring-flavouring-additive-free foodstuff it attempts
to describe. (Inorganic pizza anyone?)
'Wholefoods' are not additive-free necessarily. What would be a good
word to describe 'bio' food? (You score double if the word has a French
origin, thus recognisable in French and English.)
"au naturel".
? au and eau are not synonyms

Janet
Harrison Hill
2017-05-16 15:01:47 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by occam
In a recent chat with a BrE friend I mentioned a certain brand of food
which I described as 'bio'. She drew a blank. I had to explain that this
is short for organic foodstuff ('biologique') in Continental Europe.
It struck me that neither word (organic, biologique) is an accurate
description of colouring-flavouring-additive-free foodstuff it attempts
to describe. (Inorganic pizza anyone?)
'Wholefoods' are not additive-free necessarily. What would be a good
word to describe 'bio' food? (You score double if the word has a French
origin, thus recognisable in French and English.)
"au naturel".
? au and eau are not synonyms
I never was any good at French; but you'd need to be spectacularly
useless at it, to not know that "water" and whatever "au" means
are not synonyms.

<https://world.openfoodfacts.org/product/3564700459430/thon-entier-albacore-au-naturel-peche-ocean>
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