Discussion:
Tipping in the UK/EU (Or, Copenhagen Redux)
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Lewis
2017-05-05 13:58:03 UTC
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I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I’ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I’m wondering if my information is out
of date. We’re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we’ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I’d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.

If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?

Not planning on having any tour guides except in St Petersburg, and I
think that tour is an all-in-one thing.

Also, if I do need to tip, is it better to just keep some euro coins or
try to add it to my ApplePay?

(I know UK and Denmark and Sweden aren't on the euro, but at least in
Denmark and Sweden I've been told anyone and everyone will take them,
and Finland (Finland Finland!) is on the euro, so that just leaves the
UK and since we'll be in London it might not be an issue?
--
We are born naked, wet and hungry; then it's all downhill.
Paul Carmichael
2017-05-05 15:27:29 UTC
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Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I’ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I’m wondering if my information is out
of date. We’re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we’ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I’d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
In the UK, 10% is normal in restaurants etc. Has to involve some level of service though
(IMHO) ie; I would never tip a barman, but a waiter, yes.

Here is Spain it's not traditional to tip, but tourists generally do. I don't. Well, if
the change is just coins, I tend to leave that, but not notes.

I could never understand the US compulsory 15%.
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
m***@gmail.com
2017-05-05 16:16:52 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I’ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I’m wondering if my information is out
of date. We’re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we’ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I’d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
In the UK, 10% is normal in restaurants etc. Has to involve some level of service though
(IMHO) ie; I would never tip a barman, but a waiter, yes.
Here is Spain it's not traditional to tip, but tourists generally do. I don't. Well, if
the change is just coins, I tend to leave that, but not notes.
I could never understand the US compulsory 15%.
--
Paul.
https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Only now in the U.S. 18% or 20% is often suggested on the bill. I normally tip 15% but if the waitress is cute and has a nice smile, I have been known to leave a 20% tip.

Tex
J. J. Lodder
2017-05-16 14:17:44 UTC
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Post by m***@gmail.com
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I've heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I'm wondering if my information is out
of date. We're only in the UK for a couple of days, but we'll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I'd
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
In the UK, 10% is normal in restaurants etc. Has to involve some level
of service though (IMHO) ie; I would never tip a barman, but a waiter,
yes.
Here is Spain it's not traditional to tip, but tourists generally do. I
don't. Well, if the change is just coins, I tend to leave that, but not
notes.
I could never understand the US compulsory 15%.
--
Paul.
https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Only now in the U.S. 18% or 20% is often suggested on the bill. I normally
tip 15% but if the waitress is cute and has a nice smile, I have been
known to leave a 20% tip.
You are sure it is the smile you look at?

Jan
Don Phillipson
2017-05-05 20:33:42 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I've heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I'm wondering if my information is out
of date. . . . If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down
restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
In the UK, 10% is normal in restaurants etc. Has to involve some level of
service though (IMHO) ie; I would never tip a barman, but a waiter, yes.
These customs are unique to each community and they vary hugely, e.g.
(from decades ago):
1. Theatre ushers in France expect a tip: theatre ushers in England do
not.
2. Austrians tipped by rounding up the bill. If the bill was 80 schillings
you paid 100 i.e. tipped 25 per cent; if the bill was 140 schillings you
paid 150 i.e. tipped 7 or 8 per cent.
3. Assistant hairdressers were tipped in the UK: but not the owner
of the business.
4. In some countries "service compris" appears on the bill, i.e. a
surcharge like a tip, which precludes personal tipping.
5. In the UK railway porters (baggage handlers) were tipped but
not stationmasters (in the days when there were stationmasters.)
Really old-fashioned travelers (or snobs emulating them) might
also tip the engine driver after a long trip.

Travel agents used to supply detailed information on the tipping protocol
in each country or major city (but I do not know that travel agents nowadays
provide such a service. Big business used to employ consultants to
prepare their salesmen, e.g. to avoid displaying the soles of their shoes
to Japanese, but I do not know that this is still a paying business.)
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Jenny Telia
2017-05-23 06:30:14 UTC
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Post by Don Phillipson
5. In the UK railway porters (baggage handlers) were tipped but
not stationmasters (in the days when there were stationmasters.)
Really old-fashioned travelers (or snobs emulating them) might
also tip the engine driver after a long trip.
I hope you realise by including this suggestion (no.5) you have invited
a huge question mark over the rest of your suggestions. For a moment I
thought I had wandered into a P.G. Wodehouse novel. I cannot remember
the last time I saw a railway porter in King's Cross station, let alone
notice the engine driver. It must've been all that steam obscuring my view.
Janet
2017-05-23 13:06:47 UTC
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Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Don Phillipson
5. In the UK railway porters (baggage handlers) were tipped but
not stationmasters (in the days when there were stationmasters.)
Really old-fashioned travelers (or snobs emulating them) might
also tip the engine driver after a long trip.
I hope you realise by including this suggestion (no.5) you have invited
a huge question mark over the rest of your suggestions. For a moment I
thought I had wandered into a P.G. Wodehouse novel. I cannot remember
the last time I saw a railway porter in King's Cross station, let alone
notice the engine driver. It must've been all that steam obscuring my view.
:-)

janet
David Kleinecke
2017-05-23 16:47:51 UTC
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Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Don Phillipson
5. In the UK railway porters (baggage handlers) were tipped but
not stationmasters (in the days when there were stationmasters.)
Really old-fashioned travelers (or snobs emulating them) might
also tip the engine driver after a long trip.
I hope you realise by including this suggestion (no.5) you have invited
a huge question mark over the rest of your suggestions. For a moment I
thought I had wandered into a P.G. Wodehouse novel. I cannot remember
the last time I saw a railway porter in King's Cross station, let alone
notice the engine driver. It must've been all that steam obscuring my view.
:-)
And cow-tipping is universally deplored.
Peter Moylan
2017-05-24 04:14:02 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Don Phillipson
5. In the UK railway porters (baggage handlers) were tipped but
not stationmasters (in the days when there were stationmasters.)
Really old-fashioned travelers (or snobs emulating them) might
also tip the engine driver after a long trip.
I hope you realise by including this suggestion (no.5) you have invited
a huge question mark over the rest of your suggestions. For a moment I
thought I had wandered into a P.G. Wodehouse novel. I cannot remember
the last time I saw a railway porter in King's Cross station, let alone
notice the engine driver. It must've been all that steam obscuring my view.
:-)
And cow-tipping is universally deplored.
And rightly so. It only helps to perpetuate their getting starvation wages.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
J. J. Lodder
2017-05-24 06:20:01 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Don Phillipson
5. In the UK railway porters (baggage handlers) were tipped but
not stationmasters (in the days when there were stationmasters.)
Really old-fashioned travelers (or snobs emulating them) might
also tip the engine driver after a long trip.
I hope you realise by including this suggestion (no.5) you have
invited a huge question mark over the rest of your suggestions. For a
moment I thought I had wandered into a P.G. Wodehouse novel. I cannot
remember the last time I saw a railway porter in King's Cross station,
let alone notice the engine driver. It must've been all that steam
obscuring my view.
:-)
And cow-tipping is universally deplored.
And rightly so. It only helps to perpetuate their getting starvation wages.
Cows on starvation?
You must have the craziest farmers in the world,
down under,

Jan
Peter Moylan
2017-05-24 10:55:41 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by David Kleinecke
And cow-tipping is universally deplored.
And rightly so. It only helps to perpetuate their getting starvation wages.
Cows on starvation?
You must have the craziest farmers in the world,
down under,
Quite the opposite. We don't tip them.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Sam Plusnet
2017-05-26 01:44:23 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by David Kleinecke
And cow-tipping is universally deplored.
And rightly so. It only helps to perpetuate their getting starvation wages.
Cows on starvation?
You must have the craziest farmers in the world,
down under,
Quite the opposite. We don't tip them.
Well you should. They don't even qualify for the minimum wage.
--
Sam Plusnet
bill van
2017-05-26 05:48:18 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by David Kleinecke
And cow-tipping is universally deplored.
And rightly so. It only helps to perpetuate their getting starvation wages.
Cows on starvation?
You must have the craziest farmers in the world,
down under,
Quite the opposite. We don't tip them.
Well you should. They don't even qualify for the minimum wage.
If they don't like, they should organize. Get in the moooood for
cowlective bargaining.
--
bill
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-26 13:47:22 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by David Kleinecke
And cow-tipping is universally deplored.
And rightly so. It only helps to perpetuate their getting starvation wages.
Cows on starvation?
You must have the craziest farmers in the world,
down under,
Quite the opposite. We don't tip them.
Well you should. They don't even qualify for the minimum wage.
If they don't like, they should organize. Get in the moooood for
cowlective bargaining.
Do you expect their demands to be herd?
Janet
2017-05-30 09:46:43 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by David Kleinecke
And cow-tipping is universally deplored.
And rightly so. It only helps to perpetuate their getting starvation wages.
Cows on starvation?
You must have the craziest farmers in the world,
down under,
Quite the opposite. We don't tip them.
Well you should. They don't even qualify for the minimum wage.
Don't worry, those lazy moos are cash cows, lolling around on sofas,

http://www.intershape.com/Cow_Comfort/cow-comfort.htm

enjoying life on state benefits, subsidised by the taxpayer.

Janet.

Sam Plusnet
2017-05-23 21:23:33 UTC
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Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Don Phillipson
5. In the UK railway porters (baggage handlers) were tipped but
not stationmasters (in the days when there were stationmasters.)
Really old-fashioned travelers (or snobs emulating them) might
also tip the engine driver after a long trip.
I hope you realise by including this suggestion (no.5) you have invited
a huge question mark over the rest of your suggestions. For a moment I
thought I had wandered into a P.G. Wodehouse novel. I cannot remember
the last time I saw a railway porter in King's Cross station, let alone
notice the engine driver. It must've been all that steam obscuring my view.
:-)
Alternatively, you might have some smut in your eye, in which case a
kindly handsome doctor may offer to assist.
--
Sam Plusnet
Charles Bishop
2017-05-24 22:01:30 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Don Phillipson
5. In the UK railway porters (baggage handlers) were tipped but
not stationmasters (in the days when there were stationmasters.)
Really old-fashioned travelers (or snobs emulating them) might
also tip the engine driver after a long trip.
I hope you realise by including this suggestion (no.5) you have invited
a huge question mark over the rest of your suggestions. For a moment I
thought I had wandered into a P.G. Wodehouse novel. I cannot remember
the last time I saw a railway porter in King's Cross station, let alone
notice the engine driver. It must've been all that steam obscuring my view.
:-)
Alternatively, you might have some smut in your eye, in which case a
kindly handsome doctor may offer to assist.
And of course the doctor would need to steady her head by holding her
chin firmly with one hand while the other uses the tip of his
handkerchief to remove the small bit of matter that is in her eye. It's
at this time that the doctor's fiancee comes upon the pair, and of
course, mistakes his intentions.

charles, hilarity ensues, until the third act and the denouement.
LFS
2017-05-23 17:19:06 UTC
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Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Don Phillipson
5. In the UK railway porters (baggage handlers) were tipped but
not stationmasters (in the days when there were stationmasters.)
Really old-fashioned travelers (or snobs emulating them) might
also tip the engine driver after a long trip.
I hope you realise by including this suggestion (no.5) you have invited
a huge question mark over the rest of your suggestions. For a moment I
thought I had wandered into a P.G. Wodehouse novel. I cannot remember
the last time I saw a railway porter in King's Cross station, let alone
notice the engine driver. It must've been all that steam obscuring my view.
Don did preface his remarks with "from decades ago". It is about five
decades since I last saw a railway porter at Kings Cross and I remember
it vividly because he was hauling several suitcases for us towards a
train to Edinburgh and my father had disappeared without warning,
probably to buy a paper, much to my mother's concern.

In an attempt to gain control of the situation, she asked the porter "Do
you know what my husband looks like?" His reply was "Why, madam? Don't
you?" which made me laugh so much that I developed hiccups.

My mother was not amused: she was cross with the porter for being
cheeky, with me for laughing and with my father for making her anxious.
He of course had no idea why she was angry when he reappeared and I was
speechless with laughs and hiccups.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Paul Wolff
2017-05-23 19:09:05 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Don Phillipson
5. In the UK railway porters (baggage handlers) were tipped but
not stationmasters (in the days when there were stationmasters.)
Really old-fashioned travelers (or snobs emulating them) might
also tip the engine driver after a long trip.
I hope you realise by including this suggestion (no.5) you have invited
a huge question mark over the rest of your suggestions. For a moment I
thought I had wandered into a P.G. Wodehouse novel. I cannot remember
the last time I saw a railway porter in King's Cross station, let alone
notice the engine driver. It must've been all that steam obscuring my view.
Don did preface his remarks with "from decades ago". It is about five
decades since I last saw a railway porter at Kings Cross and I remember
it vividly because he was hauling several suitcases for us towards a
train to Edinburgh and my father had disappeared without warning,
probably to buy a paper, much to my mother's concern.
In an attempt to gain control of the situation, she asked the porter
"Do you know what my husband looks like?" His reply was "Why, madam?
Don't you?" which made me laugh so much that I developed hiccups.
My mother was not amused: she was cross with the porter for being
cheeky, with me for laughing and with my father for making her anxious.
He of course had no idea why she was angry when he reappeared and I was
speechless with laughs and hiccups.
I just loved those hilarious family moments. I remember one summer
holiday evening not being able to do anything other than lie on the
floor and roll about sobbing with laughter while my little sister, with
a straight face, tried to explain to my parents and me the rules of a
card game she had just invented, and we had to play.

Sorry. Nothing to do with a.u.e, all to do with family life.
--
Paul
Richard Bollard
2017-05-25 01:11:06 UTC
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On Tue, 23 May 2017 20:09:05 +0100, Paul Wolff
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by LFS
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Don Phillipson
5. In the UK railway porters (baggage handlers) were tipped but
not stationmasters (in the days when there were stationmasters.)
Really old-fashioned travelers (or snobs emulating them) might
also tip the engine driver after a long trip.
I hope you realise by including this suggestion (no.5) you have invited
a huge question mark over the rest of your suggestions. For a moment I
thought I had wandered into a P.G. Wodehouse novel. I cannot remember
the last time I saw a railway porter in King's Cross station, let alone
notice the engine driver. It must've been all that steam obscuring my view.
Don did preface his remarks with "from decades ago". It is about five
decades since I last saw a railway porter at Kings Cross and I remember
it vividly because he was hauling several suitcases for us towards a
train to Edinburgh and my father had disappeared without warning,
probably to buy a paper, much to my mother's concern.
In an attempt to gain control of the situation, she asked the porter
"Do you know what my husband looks like?" His reply was "Why, madam?
Don't you?" which made me laugh so much that I developed hiccups.
My mother was not amused: she was cross with the porter for being
cheeky, with me for laughing and with my father for making her anxious.
He of course had no idea why she was angry when he reappeared and I was
speechless with laughs and hiccups.
I just loved those hilarious family moments. I remember one summer
holiday evening not being able to do anything other than lie on the
floor and roll about sobbing with laughter while my little sister, with
a straight face, tried to explain to my parents and me the rules of a
card game she had just invented, and we had to play.
Sorry. Nothing to do with a.u.e, all to do with family life.
My memory is having returned from the city carrying a religious tract
I had been given. It was titled "Holy Holes" and was written by one
Moses David. My mother started reading it aloud to me and my brother
and we laughed harder and harder as each new bizarre claim was made .
It was better than a parody would be.

I just Googled it. There is an image that you can just about read.
Apparently it was distributed by the loony "Children of God" in 1973.
That seems right.
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
Lewis
2017-05-26 01:04:37 UTC
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Post by Richard Bollard
On Tue, 23 May 2017 20:09:05 +0100, Paul Wolff
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by LFS
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Don Phillipson
5. In the UK railway porters (baggage handlers) were tipped but
not stationmasters (in the days when there were stationmasters.)
Really old-fashioned travelers (or snobs emulating them) might
also tip the engine driver after a long trip.
I hope you realise by including this suggestion (no.5) you have invited
a huge question mark over the rest of your suggestions. For a moment I
thought I had wandered into a P.G. Wodehouse novel. I cannot remember
the last time I saw a railway porter in King's Cross station, let alone
notice the engine driver. It must've been all that steam obscuring my view.
Don did preface his remarks with "from decades ago". It is about five
decades since I last saw a railway porter at Kings Cross and I remember
it vividly because he was hauling several suitcases for us towards a
train to Edinburgh and my father had disappeared without warning,
probably to buy a paper, much to my mother's concern.
In an attempt to gain control of the situation, she asked the porter
"Do you know what my husband looks like?" His reply was "Why, madam?
Don't you?" which made me laugh so much that I developed hiccups.
My mother was not amused: she was cross with the porter for being
cheeky, with me for laughing and with my father for making her anxious.
He of course had no idea why she was angry when he reappeared and I was
speechless with laughs and hiccups.
I just loved those hilarious family moments. I remember one summer
holiday evening not being able to do anything other than lie on the
floor and roll about sobbing with laughter while my little sister, with
a straight face, tried to explain to my parents and me the rules of a
card game she had just invented, and we had to play.
Sorry. Nothing to do with a.u.e, all to do with family life.
My memory is having returned from the city carrying a religious tract
I had been given. It was titled "Holy Holes" and was written by one
Moses David. My mother started reading it aloud to me and my brother
and we laughed harder and harder as each new bizarre claim was made .
It was better than a parody would be.
I just Googled it. There is an image that you can just about read.
Apparently it was distributed by the loony "Children of God" in 1973.
That seems right.
This is the clearest image I found, and is perfectly readable:

<Loading Image...>
--
I never read much; I have something else to do.
Richard Bollard
2017-05-29 23:29:24 UTC
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On Fri, 26 May 2017 01:04:37 -0000 (UTC), Lewis
Post by Lewis
Post by Richard Bollard
On Tue, 23 May 2017 20:09:05 +0100, Paul Wolff
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by LFS
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Don Phillipson
5. In the UK railway porters (baggage handlers) were tipped but
not stationmasters (in the days when there were stationmasters.)
Really old-fashioned travelers (or snobs emulating them) might
also tip the engine driver after a long trip.
I hope you realise by including this suggestion (no.5) you have invited
a huge question mark over the rest of your suggestions. For a moment I
thought I had wandered into a P.G. Wodehouse novel. I cannot remember
the last time I saw a railway porter in King's Cross station, let alone
notice the engine driver. It must've been all that steam obscuring my view.
Don did preface his remarks with "from decades ago". It is about five
decades since I last saw a railway porter at Kings Cross and I remember
it vividly because he was hauling several suitcases for us towards a
train to Edinburgh and my father had disappeared without warning,
probably to buy a paper, much to my mother's concern.
In an attempt to gain control of the situation, she asked the porter
"Do you know what my husband looks like?" His reply was "Why, madam?
Don't you?" which made me laugh so much that I developed hiccups.
My mother was not amused: she was cross with the porter for being
cheeky, with me for laughing and with my father for making her anxious.
He of course had no idea why she was angry when he reappeared and I was
speechless with laughs and hiccups.
I just loved those hilarious family moments. I remember one summer
holiday evening not being able to do anything other than lie on the
floor and roll about sobbing with laughter while my little sister, with
a straight face, tried to explain to my parents and me the rules of a
card game she had just invented, and we had to play.
Sorry. Nothing to do with a.u.e, all to do with family life.
My memory is having returned from the city carrying a religious tract
I had been given. It was titled "Holy Holes" and was written by one
Moses David. My mother started reading it aloud to me and my brother
and we laughed harder and harder as each new bizarre claim was made .
It was better than a parody would be.
I just Googled it. There is an image that you can just about read.
Apparently it was distributed by the loony "Children of God" in 1973.
That seems right.
<http://c8.alamy.com/comp/BR8WEG/holy-holes-by-moses-david-cover-of-pamphlet-by-the-children-of-god-BR8WEG.jpg>
Thanks, much better than the ones I found. It is a very silly thing.
--
Richard Bollard
Canberra Australia

To email, I'm at AMT not spAMT.
Robert Bannister
2017-05-23 23:44:54 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by Don Phillipson
5. In the UK railway porters (baggage handlers) were tipped but
not stationmasters (in the days when there were stationmasters.)
Really old-fashioned travelers (or snobs emulating them) might
also tip the engine driver after a long trip.
I hope you realise by including this suggestion (no.5) you have invited
a huge question mark over the rest of your suggestions. For a moment I
thought I had wandered into a P.G. Wodehouse novel. I cannot remember
the last time I saw a railway porter in King's Cross station, let alone
notice the engine driver. It must've been all that steam obscuring my view.
Don did preface his remarks with "from decades ago". It is about five
decades since I last saw a railway porter at Kings Cross and I remember
it vividly because he was hauling several suitcases for us towards a
train to Edinburgh and my father had disappeared without warning,
probably to buy a paper, much to my mother's concern.
In an attempt to gain control of the situation, she asked the porter "Do
you know what my husband looks like?" His reply was "Why, madam? Don't
you?" which made me laugh so much that I developed hiccups.
My mother was not amused: she was cross with the porter for being
cheeky, with me for laughing and with my father for making her anxious.
He of course had no idea why she was angry when he reappeared and I was
speechless with laughs and hiccups.
I'm still chuckling. Great story. Your poor mother.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
Lewis
2017-05-05 22:46:05 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I’ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I’m wondering if my information is out
of date. We’re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we’ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I’d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
In the UK, 10% is normal in restaurants etc. Has to involve some level of service though
(IMHO) ie; I would never tip a barman, but a waiter, yes.
At a pub isn't it usual to, after many rounds, add "one for yourself"?

I don't plan on spending that much time in a pub in our few days there,
so I doubt it'll come up.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Here is Spain it's not traditional to tip, but tourists generally do. I don't. Well, if
the change is just coins, I tend to leave that, but not notes.
I could never understand the US compulsory 15%.
Waiters are paid sub-standard wages. If they don't get tips, they
starve, lose their apartments, can't drive their cars, etc. I think the
"tip" minimum wage is something like $2/hour?

It is the law that any employer must pay at least $7.25/hr inclusive of
tips, but this rarely happens. If a waiter is short on tips, they just
don't get to buy groceries that day/week.
--
Science is the foot that kicks magic square in the nuts.
Peter Moylan
2017-05-06 02:18:37 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Paul Carmichael
I could never understand the US compulsory 15%.
Waiters are paid sub-standard wages. If they don't get tips, they
starve, lose their apartments, can't drive their cars, etc. I think the
"tip" minimum wage is something like $2/hour?
It is the law that any employer must pay at least $7.25/hr inclusive of
tips, but this rarely happens. If a waiter is short on tips, they just
don't get to buy groceries that day/week.
That used to be true in many countries. Wages didn't increase until
enough people stopped tipping.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Robert Bannister
2017-05-06 04:20:39 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I’ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I’m wondering if my information is out
of date. We’re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we’ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I’d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
In the UK, 10% is normal in restaurants etc. Has to involve some level of service though
(IMHO) ie; I would never tip a barman, but a waiter, yes.
At a pub isn't it usual to, after many rounds, add "one for yourself"?
Surely only when you know the landlord or barmaid quite well.
Post by Lewis
I don't plan on spending that much time in a pub in our few days there,
so I doubt it'll come up.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Here is Spain it's not traditional to tip, but tourists generally do. I don't. Well, if
the change is just coins, I tend to leave that, but not notes.
I could never understand the US compulsory 15%.
Waiters are paid sub-standard wages.
Difference in countries: "The Fair Work Act enacts the official minimum
pay for full time waiting is $16.67 per hour (Australian national
minimum wage is $15.51 per hour). Casual waiters should get paid at
least $20.71 per hour."


If they don't get tips, they
Post by Lewis
starve, lose their apartments, can't drive their cars, etc. I think the
"tip" minimum wage is something like $2/hour?
It is the law that any employer must pay at least $7.25/hr inclusive of
tips, but this rarely happens. If a waiter is short on tips, they just
don't get to buy groceries that day/week.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
Janet
2017-05-06 14:30:27 UTC
Reply
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Post by Lewis
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I?ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I?m wondering if my information is out
of date. We?re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we?ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I?d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
In the UK, 10% is normal in restaurants etc. Has to involve some level of service though
(IMHO) ie; I would never tip a barman, but a waiter, yes.
At a pub isn't it usual to, after many rounds, add "one for yourself"?
No. That's something a regular customer of the pub might
(occasionally) say to a regular barperson they were on friendly social
terms with. They wouldn't say it on every visit; and a once-only visitor
would not normally say it at all.

Janet.
Harrison Hill
2017-05-06 14:52:46 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Lewis
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I?ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I?m wondering if my information is out
of date. We?re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we?ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I?d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
In the UK, 10% is normal in restaurants etc. Has to involve some level of service though
(IMHO) ie; I would never tip a barman, but a waiter, yes.
At a pub isn't it usual to, after many rounds, add "one for yourself"?
No. That's something a regular customer of the pub might
(occasionally) say to a regular barperson they were on friendly social
terms with. They wouldn't say it on every visit; and a once-only visitor
would not normally say it at all.
Agreed.
Charles Bishop
2017-05-06 15:48:10 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Lewis
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I’ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I’m wondering if my information is out
of date. We’re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we’ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I’d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
In the UK, 10% is normal in restaurants etc. Has to involve some level of
service though
(IMHO) ie; I would never tip a barman, but a waiter, yes.
At a pub isn't it usual to, after many rounds, add "one for yourself"?
I don't plan on spending that much time in a pub in our few days there,
so I doubt it'll come up.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Here is Spain it's not traditional to tip, but tourists generally do. I don't. Well, if
the change is just coins, I tend to leave that, but not notes.
I could never understand the US compulsory 15%.
Waiters are paid sub-standard wages. If they don't get tips, they
starve, lose their apartments, can't drive their cars, etc. I think the
"tip" minimum wage is something like $2/hour?
It is the law that any employer must pay at least $7.25/hr inclusive of
tips, but this rarely happens. If a waiter is short on tips, they just
don't get to buy groceries that day/week.
We are going to disagree on this one probably, but it's not incumbent on
me to see that a person makes "enough" in their job. Especially if there
is no way for me to know what "enough" is. If it turns out that their
"wage" + tips isn't enough to live on then they should find another line
of work or negotiate with their employer.

I realize this is complicated by the fact that tipping is part of US
society and has been for some time so it will be some time before this
is resolved but I think change is coming.

As long as I'm here - the "tip jar" came into being in my life time -
this allowed people who didn't directly serve customers as waiters did
to receive "tips" if they merely handed a cup of coffee to someone
across a counter, performing no "service" at all but merely doing their
job. What may have happened is that there was an increase in income as
the tip jar was first used, but then surely employers would see that the
employees were making more/hr and reduced what they had to pay an
employee to retain them.

Paying an employee less is a benefit to the employer since the amount
paid triggers a lower amount the employer has to pay as social security
and the like.

I think tipping is changing but don't see the outcome.
--
charles
Peter Moylan
2017-05-06 16:02:37 UTC
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Post by Charles Bishop
We are going to disagree on this one probably, but it's not incumbent on
me to see that a person makes "enough" in their job. Especially if there
is no way for me to know what "enough" is. If it turns out that their
"wage" + tips isn't enough to live on then they should find another line
of work or negotiate with their employer.
I realize this is complicated by the fact that tipping is part of US
society and has been for some time so it will be some time before this
is resolved but I think change is coming.
The US is unusual in its attitude that the poor should know their place
and not presume to be as good as their betters. The rich should get rich
and the poor should get poorer. Tipping is condescension, but the people
involved will never admit that. They hold to their right to throw their
coins to the underclass.

They are probably scared that the waiters will get uppity if they are
given a living wage. The observed fact is that this does not happen in
countries where waiters are treated as full citizens. Believe it or not,
when they are paid a proper wage they still give good service. That's
their job, and they are paid for it.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Tony Cooper
2017-05-06 17:13:53 UTC
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On Sat, 06 May 2017 08:48:10 -0700, Charles Bishop
Post by Charles Bishop
I think tipping is changing but don't see the outcome.
What is somewhat surprising is that several non-Americans have
provided guidelines on accepting tipping practices in other countries.
It seems that it is *amount* accepted here and not the practice itself
that is unacceptable.

In other words, they do it but they don't so it the same way that we
do it. And that's somehow a bone of contention.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Lewis
2017-05-08 14:43:24 UTC
Reply
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Post by Charles Bishop
Post by Lewis
Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I’ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I’m wondering if my information is out
of date. We’re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we’ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I’d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
In the UK, 10% is normal in restaurants etc. Has to involve some level of
service though
(IMHO) ie; I would never tip a barman, but a waiter, yes.
At a pub isn't it usual to, after many rounds, add "one for yourself"?
I don't plan on spending that much time in a pub in our few days there,
so I doubt it'll come up.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Here is Spain it's not traditional to tip, but tourists generally do. I
don't. Well, if
the change is just coins, I tend to leave that, but not notes.
I could never understand the US compulsory 15%.
Waiters are paid sub-standard wages. If they don't get tips, they
starve, lose their apartments, can't drive their cars, etc. I think the
"tip" minimum wage is something like $2/hour?
It is the law that any employer must pay at least $7.25/hr inclusive of
tips, but this rarely happens. If a waiter is short on tips, they just
don't get to buy groceries that day/week.
We are going to disagree on this one probably,
I doubt it.
Post by Charles Bishop
but it's not incumbent on me to see that a person makes "enough" in
their job. Especially if there is no way for me to know what "enough"
is. If it turns out that their "wage" + tips isn't enough to live on
then they should find another line of work or negotiate with their
employer.
In theory, yes. But in practice, in the US, if you don't tip you're an
asshole, because everyone tips. That's how the system works. Could the
restaurants increase the cost of the food items $1-$2 to cover the money
lost to not tipping? Of course they could. Do they? No,they do not.
Post by Charles Bishop
I realize this is complicated by the fact that tipping is part of US
society and has been for some time so it will be some time before this
is resolved but I think change is coming.
I see no evidence of that. Tipping has only increased. When I was a kid,
you tipped 10%. 12% for very good service. When I was in High school and
college the range was more like 10-15%, and I would tip 15%. Now the
range is more like 18-25%. Some restaurants even print a helpful "tip
amount" at the bottom of the receipt. The most recent one I saw was 25%,
22% and 20%.
Post by Charles Bishop
As long as I'm here - the "tip jar" came into being in my life time -
this allowed people who didn't directly serve customers as waiters did
to receive "tips" if they merely handed a cup of coffee to someone
across a counter, performing no "service" at all but merely doing their
job.
I saw tip jars before they exploded on the scene with all the coffee
shops, but I can't remember where they were. It used to be that I only
ever tipped for drinks that required the person to take an order and
make a drink (say a half caf soy latte, not that I would ever order
something like that). Now I have a regular coffee shop and I simply
round up to the next dollar on anything I get, but then again i know
everyone there.
Post by Charles Bishop
What may have happened is that there was an increase in income as
the tip jar was first used, but then surely employers would see that the
employees were making more/hr and reduced what they had to pay an
employee to retain them.
Not generally, no. A good barista will get a base pay of $13-15 an
hour, plus tips. (I think the minimum wage in the US is still $7.50 or
so? But most low-end jobs start at $8-10 around here.)

The tip jar is split up among everyone working, but I know that at least
one of the baristas at my coffee shop makes between $100-$300 *A DAY* in
tips, depending on the day. He base pay is also salaried, so she's making
considerably more than $15/hr.
Post by Charles Bishop
Paying an employee less is a benefit to the employer since the amount
paid triggers a lower amount the employer has to pay as social security
and the like.
It's not that simple. Tipped employees have to report their tips to the
employer, and taxes and withholding are based on the total amount, not
just the hourly wages.
Post by Charles Bishop
I think tipping is changing but don't see the outcome.
If it is changing in the US it is simply becoming more prevalent and with
a larger percentage expected as a tip.
--
'Vetinari isn't mad.' 'Depends how you look at it. No one can be as sane
as he is without being mad.' --Feet of Clay
Charles Bishop
2017-05-06 15:37:47 UTC
Reply
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Post by Paul Carmichael
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I’ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I’m wondering if my information is out
of date. We’re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we’ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I’d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
In the UK, 10% is normal in restaurants etc. Has to involve some level of service though
(IMHO) ie; I would never tip a barman, but a waiter, yes.
Here is Spain it's not traditional to tip, but tourists generally do. I don't. Well, if
the change is just coins, I tend to leave that, but not notes.
I could never understand the US compulsory 15%.
It's not strictly compulsory, but assumed, I think. However now, on
receipts, I've seen the calculation on the total amount of, say, 16%,
18%, and 20% to save the customer the trouble of computing what the tip
should be. I think there have been some with 22% and up.

My understanding is that 10% was fine back when the income from tips
wasn't reported as stringently as it has to be now, and there was no
real necessity to report tips. Then the IRS got serious about reporting
tips and so more of the income was reported leading to less "income". To
achieve the same level of income, tips had to be increased.

There were probably other reasons for the increase as well.
--
charles
Janet
2017-05-05 17:31:44 UTC
Reply
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Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I?ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I?m wondering if my information is out
of date. We?re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we?ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I?d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
Not planning on having any tour guides except in St Petersburg, and I
think that tour is an all-in-one thing.
Also, if I do need to tip, is it better to just keep some euro coins or
try to add it to my ApplePay?
In the UK;

In a restaurant with full table service, if the waiter was pleasant and
attentive, it's usual to tip them 10% cash direct. To make sure it goes
to the right person don't leave cash tips on the table or add a tip on
your card payment.

Taxi drivers; small tip (round up the bill to the next pound).
I also tip hairdressers (10%)

No hotel staff expect tips except if a porter carries your bags to
your room.

There's no tipping in UK guest houses or Bed and Breakfasts, self
service eateries, burger bars, coffee shops, pubs or bars, planes or
trains.

if you do tip (waiters etc) use sterling.

Janet.
Peter Young
2017-05-05 17:50:00 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I?ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I?m wondering if my information is out
of date. We?re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we?ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I?d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
Not planning on having any tour guides except in St Petersburg, and I
think that tour is an all-in-one thing.
Also, if I do need to tip, is it better to just keep some euro coins or
try to add it to my ApplePay?
In the UK;
In a restaurant with full table service, if the waiter was pleasant and
attentive, it's usual to tip them 10% cash direct. To make sure it goes
to the right person don't leave cash tips on the table or add a tip on
your card payment.
Taxi drivers; small tip (round up the bill to the next pound).
I also tip hairdressers (10%)
No hotel staff expect tips except if a porter carries your bags to
your room.
There's no tipping in UK guest houses or Bed and Breakfasts, self
service eateries, burger bars, coffee shops, pubs or bars, planes or
trains.
Up to a point in pubs. If you go in just for a drink, certainly no tip
is expected. If you have a proper meal, my friend-who-is-a-lady and I
usually leave about 10%; there is often a box or a tumbler on the bar
for this purpose. If a large group of us, for instance when our
walking groups have a pub lunch after a walk, and if the staff have
been prompt and helpful, we often leave about one pound. After I had
organised a group Winter lunch for one of the walking groups with 25
people in one of our favourite pubs I left a tenner. The staff there
now welcome us like long-lost friends.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Ir)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Robert Bannister
2017-05-06 04:22:24 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I?ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I?m wondering if my information is out
of date. We?re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we?ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I?d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
Not planning on having any tour guides except in St Petersburg, and I
think that tour is an all-in-one thing.
Also, if I do need to tip, is it better to just keep some euro coins or
try to add it to my ApplePay?
In the UK;
In a restaurant with full table service, if the waiter was pleasant and
attentive, it's usual to tip them 10% cash direct. To make sure it goes
to the right person don't leave cash tips on the table or add a tip on
your card payment.
I note that the average waiter's wage is £6.82 an hour, which would
appear to be enough to live on without tips.
Post by Janet
Taxi drivers; small tip (round up the bill to the next pound).
I also tip hairdressers (10%)
No hotel staff expect tips except if a porter carries your bags to
your room.
There's no tipping in UK guest houses or Bed and Breakfasts, self
service eateries, burger bars, coffee shops, pubs or bars, planes or
trains.
if you do tip (waiters etc) use sterling.
Janet.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
s***@gowanhill.com
2017-05-06 15:45:07 UTC
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Post by Robert Bannister
I note that the average waiter's wage is £6.82 an hour, which would
appear to be enough to live on without tips.
That may be skewed by a large number of younger employees. Minimum ("living") wage in the UK is now £7.50 for age 25+. Under 18s are £4.05 or £3.50 for apprentices. Between 8-24 there are intermediate rates.

The London Living Wage rate is £9.75 per hour and the rate for the rest of the UK is £8.45 per hour, so in no case is the minimum "living" wage actually enough to live on.

Owain
Robert Bannister
2017-05-08 00:27:45 UTC
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Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by Robert Bannister
I note that the average waiter's wage is £6.82 an hour, which would
appear to be enough to live on without tips.
That may be skewed by a large number of younger employees. Minimum ("living") wage in the UK is now £7.50 for age 25+. Under 18s are £4.05 or £3.50 for apprentices. Between 8-24 there are intermediate rates.
The London Living Wage rate is £9.75 per hour and the rate for the rest of the UK is £8.45 per hour, so in no case is the minimum "living" wage actually enough to live on.
London was always expensive and it's hard to keep up with inflation. I
seem to remember paying about £10 a week rent for a flat I shared in
Sloane Street, Chelsea in 1965, which was outrageous at the time, but
probably laughable now.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-08 03:24:58 UTC
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Post by Robert Bannister
Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by Robert Bannister
I note that the average waiter's wage is £6.82 an hour, which would
appear to be enough to live on without tips.
That may be skewed by a large number of younger employees. Minimum ("living") wage in the UK is now £7.50 for age 25+. Under 18s are £4.05 or £3.50 for apprentices. Between 8-24 there are intermediate rates.
The London Living Wage rate is £9.75 per hour and the rate for the rest of the UK is £8.45 per hour, so in no case is the minimum "living" wage actually enough to live on.
London was always expensive and it's hard to keep up with inflation. I
seem to remember paying about £10 a week rent for a flat I shared in
Sloane Street, Chelsea in 1965, which was outrageous at the time, but
probably laughable now.
An original Sloane Ranger!
Robert Bannister
2017-05-09 01:37:33 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by Robert Bannister
I note that the average waiter's wage is £6.82 an hour, which would
appear to be enough to live on without tips.
That may be skewed by a large number of younger employees. Minimum ("living") wage in the UK is now £7.50 for age 25+. Under 18s are £4.05 or £3.50 for apprentices. Between 8-24 there are intermediate rates.
The London Living Wage rate is £9.75 per hour and the rate for the rest of the UK is £8.45 per hour, so in no case is the minimum "living" wage actually enough to live on.
London was always expensive and it's hard to keep up with inflation. I
seem to remember paying about £10 a week rent for a flat I shared in
Sloane Street, Chelsea in 1965, which was outrageous at the time, but
probably laughable now.
An original Sloane Ranger!
It was a nice place to live back then.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
LFS
2017-05-08 06:26:50 UTC
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Post by Robert Bannister
Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by Robert Bannister
I note that the average waiter's wage is £6.82 an hour, which would
appear to be enough to live on without tips.
That may be skewed by a large number of younger employees. Minimum
("living") wage in the UK is now £7.50 for age 25+. Under 18s are
£4.05 or £3.50 for apprentices. Between 8-24 there are intermediate
rates.
The London Living Wage rate is £9.75 per hour and the rate for the
rest of the UK is £8.45 per hour, so in no case is the minimum
"living" wage actually enough to live on.
London was always expensive and it's hard to keep up with inflation. I
seem to remember paying about £10 a week rent for a flat I shared in
Sloane Street, Chelsea in 1965, which was outrageous at the time, but
probably laughable now.
A studio flat in the area would probably command between £500 and £700
per week these days.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Robert Bannister
2017-05-09 01:39:39 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Robert Bannister
Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by Robert Bannister
I note that the average waiter's wage is £6.82 an hour, which would
appear to be enough to live on without tips.
That may be skewed by a large number of younger employees. Minimum
("living") wage in the UK is now £7.50 for age 25+. Under 18s are
£4.05 or £3.50 for apprentices. Between 8-24 there are intermediate
rates.
The London Living Wage rate is £9.75 per hour and the rate for the
rest of the UK is £8.45 per hour, so in no case is the minimum
"living" wage actually enough to live on.
London was always expensive and it's hard to keep up with inflation. I
seem to remember paying about £10 a week rent for a flat I shared in
Sloane Street, Chelsea in 1965, which was outrageous at the time, but
probably laughable now.
A studio flat in the area would probably command between £500 and £700
per week these days.
That figures. At the height of the mining boom here, people were paying
even more for that in Perth, but not now. London will continue.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
J. J. Lodder
2017-05-16 14:17:44 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I?ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I?m wondering if my information is out
of date. We?re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we?ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I?d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
Not planning on having any tour guides except in St Petersburg, and I
think that tour is an all-in-one thing.
Also, if I do need to tip, is it better to just keep some euro coins or
try to add it to my ApplePay?
In the UK;
In a restaurant with full table service, if the waiter was pleasant and
attentive, it's usual to tip them 10% cash direct. To make sure it goes
to the right person don't leave cash tips on the table or add a tip on
your card payment.
In my of course very limited UK experience tips all went into 'the pot',
which I presume was shared between them.
Waiters didn't pocket tips for themselves,

Jan
Whiskers
2017-05-05 18:56:02 UTC
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Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I’ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I’m wondering if my information is out
of date. We’re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we’ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I’d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
Not planning on having any tour guides except in St Petersburg, and I
think that tour is an all-in-one thing.
Also, if I do need to tip, is it better to just keep some euro coins or
try to add it to my ApplePay?
(I know UK and Denmark and Sweden aren't on the euro, but at least in
Denmark and Sweden I've been told anyone and everyone will take them,
and Finland (Finland Finland!) is on the euro, so that just leaves the
UK and since we'll be in London it might not be an issue?
In London, if there's a 'tip jar' or equivalent on the counter of a café
and you feel you've been looked after well, then money in the jar is the
way to go, even if you pay the bill by card. Anything less than 10%
might be seen as a criticism though. Cash left on the table is also
acceptable of course. If it's the sort of place where the waiter brings
the bill to the table and expects payment using a credit or debit card,
then you can add something by hand to the bottom of the bill instead of
leaving a cash tip - or as well as, if you feel so moved. By and large
there is no obligation or expectation to tip.

Hotels vary a bit; the posher and more expensive they are, the more
likely individual staff are to expect personal 'tips' - but I haven't
used such places in so long that I can't advise what current sensible
tip amounts are. If you have to carry your own luggage, then it's
probably fine not to tip anyone.

Be aware that some (mostly small) places even in London still can't (or
won't) accept payment by card, or will impose a minimum charge for using
a card. That goes for shops too. So keep some banknotes and coins
handy - and don't expect anyone in the UK to accept Euros, although some
places do sometimes.

If you visit Northern Ireland or Scotland you're likely to come across
Irish or Scottish bank notes. These are not widely accepted outside the
country of issue (but perfectly legal tender there).
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Lewis
2017-05-05 22:52:28 UTC
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Post by Lewis
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
Thanks all. Any comments on tipping in Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Or
Holland? Estonia?
--
And now, the rest of the story
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-06 07:03:46 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Lewis
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
Thanks all. Any comments on tipping in Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Or
Holland? Estonia?
The information at http://wikitravel.org/en/Tipping seems to be
accurate so far as the countries I'm familiar with (France, Spain, UK,
USA, Chile) are concerned, so in the absence of other information I'd
be inclined to trust it for other countries.
--
athel
Robert Bannister
2017-05-08 02:13:31 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Lewis
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
Thanks all. Any comments on tipping in Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Or
Holland? Estonia?
The information at http://wikitravel.org/en/Tipping seems to be accurate
so far as the countries I'm familiar with (France, Spain, UK, USA,
Chile) are concerned, so in the absence of other information I'd be
inclined to trust it for other countries.
I was quite surprised to see no tipping for UK taxis. While I never
tipped the local taxi drivers, I always tipped London (black) cab
drivers and was under the impression you'd get half killed if you didn't.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
Lewis
2017-05-08 14:47:43 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
Post by Lewis
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
Thanks all. Any comments on tipping in Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Or
Holland? Estonia?
The information at http://wikitravel.org/en/Tipping seems to be
accurate so far as the countries I'm familiar with (France, Spain, UK,
USA, Chile) are concerned, so in the absence of other information I'd
be inclined to trust it for other countries.
Well that seems like a useful site. Thanks!
--
Never age. Never die. Live for ever in that one last white-hot moment,
when the crowd screamed. When every note was a heartbeat. Burn across
the sky. You will never grow old. They will never say you died. --Soul
Music
Anders D. Nygaard
2017-05-22 23:03:44 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Lewis
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
Thanks all. Any comments on tipping in Denmark, Sweden, Finland, Or
Holland? Estonia?
The information at http://wikitravel.org/en/Tipping seems to be accurate
so far as the countries I'm familiar with (France, Spain, UK, USA,
Chile) are concerned, so in the absence of other information I'd be
inclined to trust it for other countries.
It's certainly trustworthy for Denmark.

/Anders, Denmark.
Bart Dinnissen
2017-05-06 21:42:47 UTC
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On Fri, 5 May 2017 13:58:03 -0000 (UTC), in alt.usage.english Lewis
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I’ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I’m wondering if my information is out
of date. We’re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we’ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I’d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
I'm Dutch, so I shall limit myself to Amsterdam (where I don't go much) -
Post by Lewis
If I get coffee, do I tip?
No.
Post by Lewis
If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
If you're satisfied. But not to specific people. You could pay the cost of the meal with an extra,
let's say ... 10%.
Post by Lewis
The guy un/loading our bags?
No, I wouldn't think so.
Post by Lewis
Cab drivers?
If you feel like it.
Post by Lewis
Tour guides?
Yes, that's expected. One or two euro's would be fine. Especially when they stand around until you
have left.
Post by Lewis
Also, if I do need to tip, is it better to just keep some euro coins or
try to add it to my ApplePay?
Euro coins.

Have a good trip,
--
Bart Dinnissen
J. J. Lodder
2017-05-16 14:17:43 UTC
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Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I've heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I'm wondering if my information is out
of date. We're only in the UK for a couple of days, but we'll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I'd
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
If I get coffee, do I tip? If I go to a sit-down restaurant with waiters?
The guy un/loading our bags? Cab drivers? Tour guides?
Not planning on having any tour guides except in St Petersburg, and I
think that tour is an all-in-one thing.
Also, if I do need to tip, is it better to just keep some euro coins or
try to add it to my ApplePay?
(I know UK and Denmark and Sweden aren't on the euro, but at least in
Denmark and Sweden I've been told anyone and everyone will take them,
and Finland (Finland Finland!) is on the euro, so that just leaves the
UK and since we'll be in London it might not be an issue?
The point is not being on Euro, but having VAT.
(for Amsterdam)
There is obviousy no good reason to tip when you have just paid a bill
that says 'all services included'.
OTOH, you can, (it is not forbidden) and it will be appreciated
to the extent that they will say thank you.
They won't look nasty if you don't.
(or follow you in the street shouting abuse)
Follow your nose: if he/she looks like a college student
earnig some extra money you may be more inclined
than when he looks like a professional in full penguin dress.

For the other categories: if they do something special for you
that's not on any bill, like carrying your luggage, you can tip them.

Tour guides come in many kinds, depending on where you are.
Some are unpaid volunteers, (so yes)
some are fully paid professional guides working
behind a huge entrance fee. (so no need)
If a tip is expected he will stand at the exit when you leave.

Things like coffee on a terrace are still mostly paid in cash.
Rounding up (keep the change) is often done.

And yes, do keep euro coins, and tip in coin,
even if you pay the bill with a credit card.

ApplePay works only in very few places,

Jan
Lewis
2017-05-18 01:44:27 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
ApplePay works only in very few places,
Odd. I've talked with several Americans who have been in Europe recently
(this year or late last year) and they all said that ApplePay worked
anywhere that took contact-less payments other than a few specific
examples (you need an Oyster Card or an Android phone for the London
Underground, I believe).
--
I thought that they were angels, but to my surprise, we climbed aboard
their starship, we headed for the skies.
LFS
2017-05-18 06:45:07 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by J. J. Lodder
ApplePay works only in very few places,
Odd. I've talked with several Americans who have been in Europe recently
(this year or late last year) and they all said that ApplePay worked
anywhere that took contact-less payments other than a few specific
examples (you need an Oyster Card or an Android phone for the London
Underground, I believe).
No, contactless payment is available on all London transport systems,
but it may depend on the type of card.

Full details at:
https://tfl.gov.uk/fares-and-payments/contactless
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
J. J. Lodder
2017-05-18 11:14:45 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by J. J. Lodder
ApplePay works only in very few places,
Odd. I've talked with several Americans who have been in Europe recently
(this year or late last year) and they all said that ApplePay worked
anywhere that took contact-less payments other than a few specific
examples (you need an Oyster Card or an Android phone for the London
Underground, I believe).
For Americans it s a differnt matter.
It doesn't work for us Europeans,

Jan
occam
2017-05-23 08:32:37 UTC
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Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I’ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I’m wondering if my information is out
of date. We’re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we’ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I’d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
Unauthorised tipping (a.k.a. fly-tipping when you are in the airplane)
is illegal in the UK.

https://www.gov.uk/report-flytipping
Sam Plusnet
2017-05-23 21:25:32 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I’ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I’m wondering if my information is out
of date. We’re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we’ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I’d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
Unauthorised tipping (a.k.a. fly-tipping when you are in the airplane)
is illegal in the UK.
https://www.gov.uk/report-flytipping
Fine!
What then am I supposed to do with all these flies?
--
Sam Plusnet
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-23 22:10:38 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by occam
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I’ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I’m wondering if my information is out
of date. We’re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we’ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I’d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
Unauthorised tipping (a.k.a. fly-tipping when you are in the airplane)
is illegal in the UK.
https://www.gov.uk/report-flytipping
Fine!
What then am I supposed to do with all these flies?
Zip up.
Peter Moylan
2017-05-24 10:58:17 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by occam
Unauthorised tipping (a.k.a. fly-tipping when you are in the airplane)
is illegal in the UK.
https://www.gov.uk/report-flytipping
Fine!
What then am I supposed to do with all these flies?
Just add them to your on-the-garbage fly collection.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Robert Bannister
2017-05-23 23:46:16 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I’ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I’m wondering if my information is out
of date. We’re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we’ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I’d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
Unauthorised tipping (a.k.a. fly-tipping when you are in the airplane)
is illegal in the UK.
https://www.gov.uk/report-flytipping
Amazing. I've never accumulated enough dead flies to make a trip to the
tip worthwhile.
--
Robert B. born England a long time ago;
Western Australia since 1972
Adam Funk
2017-05-24 13:06:57 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I’ve heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I’m wondering if my information is out
of date. We’re only in the UK for a couple of days, but we’ll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I’d
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
Unauthorised tipping (a.k.a. fly-tipping when you are in the airplane)
is illegal in the UK.
https://www.gov.uk/report-flytipping
I've never been in an aircraft where I could open the windows to drop
garbage out.
--
Master Foo once said to a visiting programmer: "There is more
Unix-nature in one line of shell script than there is in ten
thousand lines of C." --- Eric Raymond
J. J. Lodder
2017-05-24 19:36:04 UTC
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Post by Adam Funk
Post by occam
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I've heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I'm wondering if my information is out
of date. We're only in the UK for a couple of days, but we'll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I'd
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
Unauthorised tipping (a.k.a. fly-tipping when you are in the airplane)
is illegal in the UK.
https://www.gov.uk/report-flytipping
I've never been in an aircraft where I could open the windows to drop
garbage out.
So you aren't a crazy god,

Jan
Tony Cooper
2017-05-24 20:30:55 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Adam Funk
Post by occam
Post by Lewis
I seem to recall hearing many times that one is *not* supposed to tip in
the EU and rarely in the UK, but recently I've heard various people
talking about tipping in both, so I'm wondering if my information is out
of date. We're only in the UK for a couple of days, but we'll be in
Amsterdam and then Scandinavia for about three weeks, so I'd
like to get this all sorted out in my head before that.
Unauthorised tipping (a.k.a. fly-tipping when you are in the airplane)
is illegal in the UK.
https://www.gov.uk/report-flytipping
I've never been in an aircraft where I could open the windows to drop
garbage out.
So you aren't a crazy god,
While the poster hasn't been in an aircraft where he could open a
window, I have. The side windows of the Cessna 150s and Cessna 172s
that I flew had openable windows. It's greatly discouraged to open
them in flight as the wind noise is distracting and maps and such blow
about the interior. But it's possible.

It was common to open the window on the taxi runway to cool off the
interior. Fitting one of those window air conditioners to an airplane
impairs the aerodynamics.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
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