Discussion:
Oyster card (fish) staff required
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Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-20 12:48:01 UTC
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1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.

2. The hotel's lunch buffet had a more limited selection than yesterday, but
the tuna salad and the diced cheese were the same. The label for the former
read "tuna (fish)" and that for the latter, "cheese (dairy)." What helpful
allergen notices they are! The pudding, though, and here that label might be
apposite, was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick pastry shell
containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a decorative piece of maraschino
cherry. Not bad.

3. In a shop window I passed on the way to learning where the railway
station is was a sign "staff required." In AmE, "help wanted." I could
understand "staff needed," but why "required"?
Harrison Hill
2018-07-20 13:21:42 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
An Oyster card costs a couple of pounds to buy, and then you top it
up with however much you need. Buy it in any London newsagents, or at
Vitoria Station. I would strongly advise instead getting a paper "One Day
Travelcard" at Victoria, because the electronic "thinking" of the Oyster
(or swiping your bank card for that matter) is not terribly reliable.

An off-peak Travelcard - trains, Underground, buses, throughout London
(Heathrow is in London) costs £12.50 I think. Probably you can get
one at Brighton Station. All travel within and around the airport
(including the fast shuttle - soon to be Crossrail) is free of charge.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
2. The hotel's lunch buffet had a more limited selection than yesterday, but
the tuna salad and the diced cheese were the same. The label for the former
read "tuna (fish)" and that for the latter, "cheese (dairy)." What helpful
allergen notices they are! The pudding, though, and here that label might be
apposite, was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick pastry shell
containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a decorative piece of maraschino
cherry. Not bad.
3. In a shop window I passed on the way to learning where the railway
station is was a sign "staff required." In AmE, "help wanted." I could
understand "staff needed," but why "required"?
"Required" because they "need" staff?
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-20 17:34:14 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
An Oyster card costs a couple of pounds to buy, and then you top it
up with however much you need. Buy it in any London newsagents, or at
Vitoria Station. I would strongly advise instead getting a paper "One Day
Travelcard" at Victoria, because the electronic "thinking" of the Oyster
(or swiping your bank card for that matter) is not terribly reliable.
Do you actually think that answered the question?

I do not want an Oyster Card.

I do not want a "One-Day Travelcard," whatever it may be made of.

I want to take a single trip, in one direction, lasting perhaps 47 minutes.
Post by Harrison Hill
An off-peak Travelcard - trains, Underground, buses, throughout London
(Heathrow is in London) costs £12.50 I think. Probably you can get
one at Brighton Station. All travel within and around the airport
(including the fast shuttle - soon to be Crossrail) is free of charge.
Why on earth would I need one of those? What "fast shuttle"? On arrival,
a great deal of walking took me to a brief subway ride to passport control
and where I was met. (Then a coach to Oxford, which isn't necessarily
the same as the Terminal 5 tube stop; but I took the tube in '92 and
don't remember any "fast shuttle" between there and the gate.

And no, the clerk at Brighton Station (actually a Terminal) did not
indicate that any sort of Underground ticket could be purchased there.
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
2. The hotel's lunch buffet had a more limited selection than yesterday, but
the tuna salad and the diced cheese were the same. The label for the former
read "tuna (fish)" and that for the latter, "cheese (dairy)." What helpful
allergen notices they are! The pudding, though, and here that label might be
apposite, was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick pastry shell
containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a decorative piece of maraschino
cherry. Not bad.
3. In a shop window I passed on the way to learning where the railway
station is was a sign "staff required." In AmE, "help wanted." I could
understand "staff needed," but why "required"?
"Required" because they "need" staff?
Harrison Hill
2018-07-20 18:36:50 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
An Oyster card costs a couple of pounds to buy, and then you top it
up with however much you need. Buy it in any London newsagents, or at
Vitoria Station. I would strongly advise instead getting a paper "One Day
Travelcard" at Victoria, because the electronic "thinking" of the Oyster
(or swiping your bank card for that matter) is not terribly reliable.
Do you actually think that answered the question?
I do not want an Oyster Card.
I do not want a "One-Day Travelcard," whatever it may be made of.
I want to take a single trip, in one direction, lasting perhaps 47 minutes.
They'll get you on the Heathrow Express and you won't even know
the money has been taken out of your account :)
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
An off-peak Travelcard - trains, Underground, buses, throughout London
(Heathrow is in London) costs £12.50 I think. Probably you can get
one at Brighton Station. All travel within and around the airport
(including the fast shuttle - soon to be Crossrail) is free of charge.
Why on earth would I need one of those? What "fast shuttle"? On arrival,
a great deal of walking took me to a brief subway ride to passport control
and where I was met. (Then a coach to Oxford, which isn't necessarily
the same as the Terminal 5 tube stop; but I took the tube in '92 and
don't remember any "fast shuttle" between there and the gate.
There you are. You are thinking like Laura. Keep walking and you'll
eventually get to Oxford.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
And no, the clerk at Brighton Station (actually a Terminal)
ObAUE: "terminus" .
Post by Peter T. Daniels
...did not
indicate that any sort of Underground ticket could be purchased there.
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get a
Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is the
problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go everywhere?
There used to be a highwayman called Dick Turpin, and I'd trust
him with my bank card before I'd trust TFL.

Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-20 22:19:04 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
An Oyster card costs a couple of pounds to buy, and then you top it
up with however much you need. Buy it in any London newsagents, or at
Vitoria Station. I would strongly advise instead getting a paper "One Day
Travelcard" at Victoria, because the electronic "thinking" of the Oyster
(or swiping your bank card for that matter) is not terribly reliable.
Do you actually think that answered the question?
I do not want an Oyster Card.
I do not want a "One-Day Travelcard," whatever it may be made of.
I want to take a single trip, in one direction, lasting perhaps 47 minutes.
They'll get you on the Heathrow Express and you won't even know
the money has been taken out of your account :)
There is no "Heathrow Express" Underground line.
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
An off-peak Travelcard - trains, Underground, buses, throughout London
(Heathrow is in London) costs £12.50 I think. Probably you can get
one at Brighton Station. All travel within and around the airport
(including the fast shuttle - soon to be Crossrail) is free of charge.
Why on earth would I need one of those? What "fast shuttle"? On arrival,
a great deal of walking took me to a brief subway ride to passport control
and where I was met. (Then a coach to Oxford, which isn't necessarily
the same as the Terminal 5 tube stop; but I took the tube in '92 and
don't remember any "fast shuttle" between there and the gate.
There you are. You are thinking like Laura. Keep walking and you'll
eventually get to Oxford.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
And no, the clerk at Brighton Station (actually a Terminal)
ObAUE: "terminus" .
Post by Peter T. Daniels
...did not
indicate that any sort of Underground ticket could be purchased there.
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get a
Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is the
problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go everywhere?
There used to be a highwayman called Dick Turpin, and I'd trust
him with my bank card before I'd trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.

(That was for the sociopath's benefit.)
Tony Cooper
2018-07-20 22:43:12 UTC
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On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 15:19:04 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
An Oyster card costs a couple of pounds to buy, and then you top it
up with however much you need. Buy it in any London newsagents, or at
Vitoria Station. I would strongly advise instead getting a paper "One Day
Travelcard" at Victoria, because the electronic "thinking" of the Oyster
(or swiping your bank card for that matter) is not terribly reliable.
Do you actually think that answered the question?
I do not want an Oyster Card.
I do not want a "One-Day Travelcard," whatever it may be made of.
I want to take a single trip, in one direction, lasting perhaps 47 minutes.
They'll get you on the Heathrow Express and you won't even know
the money has been taken out of your account :)
There is no "Heathrow Express" Underground line.
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
An off-peak Travelcard - trains, Underground, buses, throughout London
(Heathrow is in London) costs £12.50 I think. Probably you can get
one at Brighton Station. All travel within and around the airport
(including the fast shuttle - soon to be Crossrail) is free of charge.
Why on earth would I need one of those? What "fast shuttle"? On arrival,
a great deal of walking took me to a brief subway ride to passport control
and where I was met. (Then a coach to Oxford, which isn't necessarily
the same as the Terminal 5 tube stop; but I took the tube in '92 and
don't remember any "fast shuttle" between there and the gate.
There you are. You are thinking like Laura. Keep walking and you'll
eventually get to Oxford.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
And no, the clerk at Brighton Station (actually a Terminal)
ObAUE: "terminus" .
Post by Peter T. Daniels
...did not
indicate that any sort of Underground ticket could be purchased there.
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get a
Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is the
problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go everywhere?
There used to be a highwayman called Dick Turpin, and I'd trust
him with my bank card before I'd trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the boink. We
are back to the pre-boink PTD.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
LFS
2018-07-21 06:58:50 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 15:19:04 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
An Oyster card costs a couple of pounds to buy, and then you top it
up with however much you need. Buy it in any London newsagents, or at
Vitoria Station. I would strongly advise instead getting a paper "One Day
Travelcard" at Victoria, because the electronic "thinking" of the Oyster
(or swiping your bank card for that matter) is not terribly reliable.
Do you actually think that answered the question?
I do not want an Oyster Card.
I do not want a "One-Day Travelcard," whatever it may be made of.
I want to take a single trip, in one direction, lasting perhaps 47 minutes.
They'll get you on the Heathrow Express and you won't even know
the money has been taken out of your account :)
There is no "Heathrow Express" Underground line.
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
An off-peak Travelcard - trains, Underground, buses, throughout London
(Heathrow is in London) costs £12.50 I think. Probably you can get
one at Brighton Station. All travel within and around the airport
(including the fast shuttle - soon to be Crossrail) is free of charge.
Why on earth would I need one of those? What "fast shuttle"? On arrival,
a great deal of walking took me to a brief subway ride to passport control
and where I was met. (Then a coach to Oxford, which isn't necessarily
the same as the Terminal 5 tube stop; but I took the tube in '92 and
don't remember any "fast shuttle" between there and the gate.
There you are. You are thinking like Laura. Keep walking and you'll
eventually get to Oxford.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
And no, the clerk at Brighton Station (actually a Terminal)
ObAUE: "terminus" .
Post by Peter T. Daniels
...did not
indicate that any sort of Underground ticket could be purchased there.
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get a
Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is the
problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go everywhere?
There used to be a highwayman called Dick Turpin, and I'd trust
him with my bank card before I'd trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the boink. We
are back to the pre-boink PTD.
To be fair, Hill's responses are extremely unhelpful and, having
recently become trapped in those coils, I completely understand the
frustration this engenders. But aue is really not the place to ask for
clear information about travel options.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Harrison Hill
2018-07-21 07:41:39 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 15:19:04 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
An Oyster card costs a couple of pounds to buy, and then you top it
up with however much you need. Buy it in any London newsagents, or at
Vitoria Station. I would strongly advise instead getting a paper "One Day
Travelcard" at Victoria, because the electronic "thinking" of the Oyster
(or swiping your bank card for that matter) is not terribly reliable.
Do you actually think that answered the question?
I do not want an Oyster Card.
I do not want a "One-Day Travelcard," whatever it may be made of.
I want to take a single trip, in one direction, lasting perhaps 47 minutes.
They'll get you on the Heathrow Express and you won't even know
the money has been taken out of your account :)
There is no "Heathrow Express" Underground line.
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
An off-peak Travelcard - trains, Underground, buses, throughout London
(Heathrow is in London) costs £12.50 I think. Probably you can get
one at Brighton Station. All travel within and around the airport
(including the fast shuttle - soon to be Crossrail) is free of charge.
Why on earth would I need one of those? What "fast shuttle"? On arrival,
a great deal of walking took me to a brief subway ride to passport control
and where I was met. (Then a coach to Oxford, which isn't necessarily
the same as the Terminal 5 tube stop; but I took the tube in '92 and
don't remember any "fast shuttle" between there and the gate.
There you are. You are thinking like Laura. Keep walking and you'll
eventually get to Oxford.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
And no, the clerk at Brighton Station (actually a Terminal)
ObAUE: "terminus" .
Post by Peter T. Daniels
...did not
indicate that any sort of Underground ticket could be purchased there.
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get a
Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is the
problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go everywhere?
There used to be a highwayman called Dick Turpin, and I'd trust
him with my bank card before I'd trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the boink. We
are back to the pre-boink PTD.
To be fair, Hill's responses are extremely unhelpful and, having
recently become trapped in those coils, I completely understand the
frustration this engenders. But aue is really not the place to ask for
clear information about travel options.
The Oyster Card is supposed to max out on buses and trams at £4.50.
My wife had around 6 or 7 pounds on hers, so we took the bus to
Wimbledon with no problem. Taking the tram to West Croydon, we
went to a newsagent to "top up", and were surprised to be told
there was a minus £10 balance on it. So we put £20 on it, and by the
time we'd reached Beckenham, it wouldn't let us out - because we were
£22 down.

That ruined our day. Free advice is worth what you pay for it.
Tony Cooper
2018-07-21 12:19:23 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get a
Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is the
problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go everywhere?
There used to be a highwayman called Dick Turpin, and I'd trust
him with my bank card before I'd trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the boink. We
are back to the pre-boink PTD.
To be fair, Hill's responses are extremely unhelpful and, having
recently become trapped in those coils, I completely understand the
frustration this engenders. But aue is really not the place to ask for
clear information about travel options.
Nonetheless, when a suggestion or solution is offered in good faith it
should not be met with rudeness. If the solution or advice is not
wanted, the appropriate response is either no response or a "Thanks
for trying".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-22 02:53:21 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by LFS
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get a
Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is the
problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go everywhere?
There used to be a highwayman called Dick Turpin, and I'd trust
him with my bank card before I'd trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the boink. We
are back to the pre-boink PTD.
To be fair, Hill's responses are extremely unhelpful and, having
recently become trapped in those coils, I completely understand the
frustration this engenders. But aue is really not the place to ask for
clear information about travel options.
Nonetheless, when a suggestion or solution is offered in good faith it
obviously not good faith, since it was repeated three times after being discounted.
Post by Tony Cooper
should not be met with rudeness. If the solution or advice is not
wanted, the appropriate response is either no response or a "Thanks
for trying".
CDB
2018-07-22 03:50:20 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by LFS
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get
a Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is
the problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go
everywhere? There used to be a highwayman called Dick
Turpin, and I'd trust him with my bank card before I'd
trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the
boink. We are back to the pre-boink PTD.
To be fair, Hill's responses are extremely unhelpful and, having
recently become trapped in those coils, I completely understand
the frustration this engenders. But aue is really not the place
to ask for clear information about travel options.
Acccording to a line snipped from the original post, the capitalised
message was not meant for Harrison, but for someone else who had
offended against PTD, quite possibly KMJ (I forget). This marked it as
a joke.
Post by Tony Cooper
Nonetheless, when a suggestion or solution is offered in good faith
it obviously not good faith, since it was repeated three times after
being discounted.
Post by Tony Cooper
should not be met with rudeness. If the solution or advice is not
wanted, the appropriate response is either no response or a
"Thanks for trying".
You haven't considered the lèse-majesté angle.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-22 10:35:57 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by LFS
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get
a Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is
the problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go
everywhere? There used to be a highwayman called Dick
Turpin, and I'd trust him with my bank card before I'd
trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the
boink. We are back to the pre-boink PTD.
To be fair, Hill's responses are extremely unhelpful and, having
recently become trapped in those coils, I completely understand
the frustration this engenders. But aue is really not the place
to ask for clear information about travel options.
Acccording to a line snipped from the original post, the capitalised
message was not meant for Harrison, but for someone else who had
offended against PTD, quite possibly KMJ (I forget). This marked it as
a joke.
No. There is only one sociopath. It recently complained about (nonexist-
ent) messages typed in all caps.
Post by CDB
Post by Tony Cooper
Nonetheless, when a suggestion or solution is offered in good faith it
obviously not good faith, since it was repeated three times after being discounted.
Post by Tony Cooper
should not be met with rudeness. If the solution or advice is not
wanted, the appropriate response is either no response or a
"Thanks for trying".
You haven't considered the lèse-majesté angle.
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-22 11:05:03 UTC
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On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 03:35:57 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by LFS
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get
a Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is
the problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go
everywhere? There used to be a highwayman called Dick
Turpin, and I'd trust him with my bank card before I'd
trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the
boink. We are back to the pre-boink PTD.
To be fair, Hill's responses are extremely unhelpful and, having
recently become trapped in those coils, I completely understand
the frustration this engenders. But aue is really not the place
to ask for clear information about travel options.
Acccording to a line snipped from the original post, the capitalised
message was not meant for Harrison, but for someone else who had
offended against PTD, quite possibly KMJ (I forget). This marked it as
a joke.
No. There is only one sociopath. It recently complained about (nonexist-
ent) messages typed in all caps.
Daniels, believe me when I tell you that you have all the markings of
an anti-social personality disorder.

"Psychopath".
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-22 13:03:13 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Daniels, believe me when I tell you that you have all the markings of
an anti-social personality disorder.
"Psychopath".
Why should I "believe" _anything_ you say that has to do with psychology?
If you ever knew anything about it, it was many decades ago.
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-22 15:25:52 UTC
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On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 06:03:13 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Daniels, believe me when I tell you that you have all the markings of
an anti-social personality disorder.
"Psychopath".
Why should I "believe" _anything_ you say that has to do with psychology?
If you ever knew anything about it, it was many decades ago.
Daniels, you have "red-eye vision".

You see out of your asshole.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-22 16:27:25 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 06:03:13 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Daniels, believe me when I tell you that you have all the markings of
an anti-social personality disorder.
"Psychopath".
Why should I "believe" _anything_ you say that has to do with psychology?
If you ever knew anything about it, it was many decades ago.
Daniels, you have "red-eye vision".
You see out of your asshole.
Same old query: off the meds, or on the sauce?
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-22 16:31:45 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 09:27:25 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 06:03:13 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Daniels, believe me when I tell you that you have all the markings of
an anti-social personality disorder.
"Psychopath".
Why should I "believe" _anything_ you say that has to do with psychology?
If you ever knew anything about it, it was many decades ago.
Daniels, you have "red-eye vision".
You see out of your asshole.
Same old query: off the meds, or on the sauce?
Your jet lag has turned into brain lag, Daniels.

https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1981/index.html
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-22 17:57:55 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 09:27:25 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 06:03:13 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Daniels, believe me when I tell you that you have all the markings of
an anti-social personality disorder.
"Psychopath".
Why should I "believe" _anything_ you say that has to do with psychology?
If you ever knew anything about it, it was many decades ago.
Daniels, you have "red-eye vision".
You see out of your asshole.
Same old query: off the meds, or on the sauce?
Your jet lag has turned into brain lag, Daniels.
https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1981/index.html
You still have not explained what brain lateralization has to do with
"dominants." That is your very own idiotic figment.
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-22 18:08:03 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 10:57:55 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 09:27:25 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 06:03:13 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Daniels, believe me when I tell you that you have all the markings of
an anti-social personality disorder.
"Psychopath".
Why should I "believe" _anything_ you say that has to do with psychology?
If you ever knew anything about it, it was many decades ago.
Daniels, you have "red-eye vision".
You see out of your asshole.
Same old query: off the meds, or on the sauce?
Your jet lag has turned into brain lag, Daniels.
https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1981/index.html
You still have not explained what brain lateralization has to do with
"dominants." That is your very own idiotic figment.
You are still twisting in the wind, Daniels.

Plenty of references available:

https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4189332/#__sec2title

https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00829/full

http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0071275

Keep twisting, sucker.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-22 18:16:20 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 10:57:55 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 09:27:25 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 06:03:13 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Daniels, believe me when I tell you that you have all the markings of
an anti-social personality disorder.
"Psychopath".
Why should I "believe" _anything_ you say that has to do with psychology?
If you ever knew anything about it, it was many decades ago.
Daniels, you have "red-eye vision".
You see out of your asshole.
Same old query: off the meds, or on the sauce?
Your jet lag has turned into brain lag, Daniels.
https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1981/index.html
You still have not explained what brain lateralization has to do with
"dominants." That is your very own idiotic figment.
You are still twisting in the wind, Daniels.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4189332/#__sec2title
You can't tell the difference between "dominants" and dominance?
Post by Mack A. Damia
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00829/full
Nothing about "dominants."
Post by Mack A. Damia
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0071275
Nothing about "dominants."
Post by Mack A. Damia
Keep twisting, sucker.
Which one of them discusses "dominants"?

Should I dignify your crap with the label "mansplaining"? You seem to be
under the impression that brain lateralization is some amazing secret not
known to just about everyone who might be reading aue.

Maybe grandmother, eggs, suck.
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-22 18:27:45 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 11:16:20 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 10:57:55 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 09:27:25 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 06:03:13 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Daniels, believe me when I tell you that you have all the markings of
an anti-social personality disorder.
"Psychopath".
Why should I "believe" _anything_ you say that has to do with psychology?
If you ever knew anything about it, it was many decades ago.
Daniels, you have "red-eye vision".
You see out of your asshole.
Same old query: off the meds, or on the sauce?
Your jet lag has turned into brain lag, Daniels.
https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1981/index.html
You still have not explained what brain lateralization has to do with
"dominants." That is your very own idiotic figment.
You are still twisting in the wind, Daniels.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4189332/#__sec2title
You can't tell the difference between "dominants" and dominance?
Post by Mack A. Damia
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00829/full
Nothing about "dominants."
Post by Mack A. Damia
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0071275
Nothing about "dominants."
Post by Mack A. Damia
Keep twisting, sucker.
Which one of them discusses "dominants"?
All of them. A "dominant" has either left or right brain "dominance".
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-22 18:30:50 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 11:16:20 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 10:57:55 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 09:27:25 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 22 Jul 2018 06:03:13 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
Daniels, believe me when I tell you that you have all the markings of
an anti-social personality disorder.
"Psychopath".
Why should I "believe" _anything_ you say that has to do with psychology?
If you ever knew anything about it, it was many decades ago.
Daniels, you have "red-eye vision".
You see out of your asshole.
Same old query: off the meds, or on the sauce?
Your jet lag has turned into brain lag, Daniels.
https://www.nobelprize.org/nobel_prizes/medicine/laureates/1981/index.html
You still have not explained what brain lateralization has to do with
"dominants." That is your very own idiotic figment.
You are still twisting in the wind, Daniels.
https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC4189332/#__sec2title
You can't tell the difference between "dominants" and dominance?
Post by Mack A. Damia
https://www.frontiersin.org/articles/10.3389/fnhum.2013.00829/full
Nothing about "dominants."
Post by Mack A. Damia
http://journals.plos.org/plosone/article?id=10.1371/journal.pone.0071275
Nothing about "dominants."
Post by Mack A. Damia
Keep twisting, sucker.
Which one of them discusses "dominants"?
All of them. A "dominant" has either left or right brain "dominance".
Where did you get that idea? Not from any neuroscience textbook.
Harrison Hill
2018-07-22 08:26:10 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by LFS
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get a
Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is the
problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go everywhere?
There used to be a highwayman called Dick Turpin, and I'd trust
him with my bank card before I'd trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the boink. We
are back to the pre-boink PTD.
To be fair, Hill's responses are extremely unhelpful and, having
recently become trapped in those coils, I completely understand the
frustration this engenders. But aue is really not the place to ask for
clear information about travel options.
Nonetheless, when a suggestion or solution is offered in good faith it
obviously not good faith, since it was repeated three times after being discounted.
I'm at work at the moment, but will come back on this tomorrow.

1) The question you asked was about an Oyster Card. You cannot buy
an Oyster Card in Brighton, because it is too far outside of London.
However I'm sure you can buy a Travel Card (which is a train ticket),
which has all the advantages of an Oyster Card, and none of its
disadvantages. If you'd been able to hold yourself together for long
enough at the ticket office to ask for what you wanted, it would have
been trivial for you to have been issued with it.

2) This is a prime example of the characteristics of some people in
this group:
a) Anger and offence taken, where none is intended.
b) No time taken to read what is written.
c) Other "experts" (who have no possible way of knowing) wading in
with definitive opinions.

3) Obviously you could have got a "through" ticket. Would it
have been cheaper? I'll tell you tomorrow. The "to London" part
is virtually halved, because London is extremely big, and all travel
(once you are within its boundaries) is "free" on the Travel Card.
London-Heathrow is free as well :)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-22 11:05:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by LFS
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get a
Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is the
problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go everywhere?
There used to be a highwayman called Dick Turpin, and I'd trust
him with my bank card before I'd trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the boink. We
are back to the pre-boink PTD.
To be fair, Hill's responses are extremely unhelpful and, having
recently become trapped in those coils, I completely understand the
frustration this engenders. But aue is really not the place to ask for
clear information about travel options.
Nonetheless, when a suggestion or solution is offered in good faith it
obviously not good faith, since it was repeated three times after being discounted.
I'm at work at the moment, but will come back on this tomorrow.
1) The question you asked was about an Oyster Card. You cannot buy
No, it was not. It was about getting to Heathrow with a simple one-way
ticket. "Oyster Card" was in the header in order to make the connection
with (fish), topic #2 of the 3-part message.
Post by Harrison Hill
an Oyster Card in Brighton, because it is too far outside of London.
However I'm sure you can buy a Travel Card (which is a train ticket),
which has all the advantages of an Oyster Card, and none of its
disadvantages. If you'd been able to hold yourself together for long
enough at the ticket office to ask for what you wanted, it would have
been trivial for you to have been issued with it.
None of the "advantages" of the Oyster Card was relevant to my need.
Would a "Travel Card" have gotten me from Victoria Station to Heathrow
for less than £6?
Post by Harrison Hill
2) This is a prime example of the characteristics of some people in
a) Anger and offence taken, where none is intended.
b) No time taken to read what is written.
When you point a finger at someone, three other fingers point back at you.
Post by Harrison Hill
c) Other "experts" (who have no possible way of knowing) wading in
with definitive opinions.
3) Obviously you could have got a "through" ticket. Would it
have been cheaper? I'll tell you tomorrow. The "to London" part
is virtually halved, because London is extremely big, and all travel
(once you are within its boundaries) is "free" on the Travel Card.
London-Heathrow is free as well :)
No idea what a "through" ticket would be.

Recall that the Brighton-to-Victoria ticket had been purchased for me,
for £18.75.
Harrison Hill
2018-07-23 08:01:21 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by LFS
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get a
Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is the
problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go everywhere?
There used to be a highwayman called Dick Turpin, and I'd trust
him with my bank card before I'd trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the boink. We
are back to the pre-boink PTD.
To be fair, Hill's responses are extremely unhelpful and, having
recently become trapped in those coils, I completely understand the
frustration this engenders. But aue is really not the place to ask for
clear information about travel options.
Nonetheless, when a suggestion or solution is offered in good faith it
obviously not good faith, since it was repeated three times after being discounted.
I'm at work at the moment, but will come back on this tomorrow.
1) The question you asked was about an Oyster Card. You cannot buy
No, it was not. It was about getting to Heathrow with a simple one-way
ticket. "Oyster Card" was in the header in order to make the connection
with (fish), topic #2 of the 3-part message.
Post by Harrison Hill
an Oyster Card in Brighton, because it is too far outside of London.
However I'm sure you can buy a Travel Card (which is a train ticket),
which has all the advantages of an Oyster Card, and none of its
disadvantages. If you'd been able to hold yourself together for long
enough at the ticket office to ask for what you wanted, it would have
been trivial for you to have been issued with it.
None of the "advantages" of the Oyster Card was relevant to my need.
Would a "Travel Card" have gotten me from Victoria Station to Heathrow
for less than £6?
Post by Harrison Hill
2) This is a prime example of the characteristics of some people in
a) Anger and offence taken, where none is intended.
b) No time taken to read what is written.
When you point a finger at someone, three other fingers point back at you.
Post by Harrison Hill
c) Other "experts" (who have no possible way of knowing) wading in
with definitive opinions.
3) Obviously you could have got a "through" ticket. Would it
have been cheaper? I'll tell you tomorrow. The "to London" part
is virtually halved, because London is extremely big, and all travel
(once you are within its boundaries) is "free" on the Travel Card.
London-Heathrow is free as well :)
No idea what a "through" ticket would be.
Recall that the Brighton-to-Victoria ticket had been purchased for me,
for £18.75.
£24.75 was a good price and I doubt if you could have done it cheaper.
The London "pattern" where you take a train to a terminus (Victoria,
say), then take the Underground to another terminus (avoid Paddington
Peter!), then continue your journey, has changed very recently - and
quite disastrously, timetable-wise, in the short-term.

The Overground now ensures N-S through trains all over the place -
which bypass the main termini. If a signal had been down, or a
trespasser was on the track, or there was a "one under" (in the jargon),
or a breakdown, you'd have been glad of the flexibility of a Travel
Card. I have free travel across London (as you have noted). Being able
to jump on any train, at any whim, is a wonderful perk...
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-21 08:50:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 15:19:04 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
An Oyster card costs a couple of pounds to buy, and then you top it
up with however much you need. Buy it in any London newsagents, or at
Vitoria Station. I would strongly advise instead getting a paper "One Day
Travelcard" at Victoria, because the electronic "thinking" of the Oyster
(or swiping your bank card for that matter) is not terribly reliable.
Do you actually think that answered the question?
I do not want an Oyster Card.
I do not want a "One-Day Travelcard," whatever it may be made of.
I want to take a single trip, in one direction, lasting perhaps 47 minutes.
They'll get you on the Heathrow Express and you won't even know
the money has been taken out of your account :)
There is no "Heathrow Express" Underground line.
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
An off-peak Travelcard - trains, Underground, buses, throughout London
(Heathrow is in London) costs £12.50 I think. Probably you can get
one at Brighton Station. All travel within and around the airport
(including the fast shuttle - soon to be Crossrail) is free of charge.
Why on earth would I need one of those? What "fast shuttle"? On arrival,
a great deal of walking took me to a brief subway ride to passport control
and where I was met. (Then a coach to Oxford, which isn't necessarily
the same as the Terminal 5 tube stop; but I took the tube in '92 and
don't remember any "fast shuttle" between there and the gate.
There you are. You are thinking like Laura. Keep walking and you'll
eventually get to Oxford.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
And no, the clerk at Brighton Station (actually a Terminal)
ObAUE: "terminus" .
Post by Peter T. Daniels
...did not
indicate that any sort of Underground ticket could be purchased there.
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get a
Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is the
problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go everywhere?
There used to be a highwayman called Dick Turpin, and I'd trust
him with my bank card before I'd trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the boink. We
are back to the pre-boink PTD.
Why did you delete the last line? Is irony too difficult for you to
comprehend?
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-21 15:38:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 21 Jul 2018 01:50:23 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 15:19:04 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
An Oyster card costs a couple of pounds to buy, and then you top it
up with however much you need. Buy it in any London newsagents, or at
Vitoria Station. I would strongly advise instead getting a paper "One Day
Travelcard" at Victoria, because the electronic "thinking" of the Oyster
(or swiping your bank card for that matter) is not terribly reliable.
Do you actually think that answered the question?
I do not want an Oyster Card.
I do not want a "One-Day Travelcard," whatever it may be made of.
I want to take a single trip, in one direction, lasting perhaps 47 minutes.
They'll get you on the Heathrow Express and you won't even know
the money has been taken out of your account :)
There is no "Heathrow Express" Underground line.
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
An off-peak Travelcard - trains, Underground, buses, throughout London
(Heathrow is in London) costs £12.50 I think. Probably you can get
one at Brighton Station. All travel within and around the airport
(including the fast shuttle - soon to be Crossrail) is free of charge.
Why on earth would I need one of those? What "fast shuttle"? On arrival,
a great deal of walking took me to a brief subway ride to passport control
and where I was met. (Then a coach to Oxford, which isn't necessarily
the same as the Terminal 5 tube stop; but I took the tube in '92 and
don't remember any "fast shuttle" between there and the gate.
There you are. You are thinking like Laura. Keep walking and you'll
eventually get to Oxford.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
And no, the clerk at Brighton Station (actually a Terminal)
ObAUE: "terminus" .
Post by Peter T. Daniels
...did not
indicate that any sort of Underground ticket could be purchased there.
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get a
Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is the
problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go everywhere?
There used to be a highwayman called Dick Turpin, and I'd trust
him with my bank card before I'd trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the boink. We
are back to the pre-boink PTD.
Why did you delete the last line? Is irony too difficult for you to
comprehend?
Not really, but it is *your* attitude, I think, that Tony was
referring to.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-22 02:54:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 21 Jul 2018 01:50:23 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 15:19:04 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
An Oyster card costs a couple of pounds to buy, and then you top it
up with however much you need. Buy it in any London newsagents, or at
Vitoria Station. I would strongly advise instead getting a paper "One Day
Travelcard" at Victoria, because the electronic "thinking" of the Oyster
(or swiping your bank card for that matter) is not terribly reliable.
Do you actually think that answered the question?
I do not want an Oyster Card.
I do not want a "One-Day Travelcard," whatever it may be made of.
I want to take a single trip, in one direction, lasting perhaps 47 minutes.
They'll get you on the Heathrow Express and you won't even know
the money has been taken out of your account :)
There is no "Heathrow Express" Underground line.
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
An off-peak Travelcard - trains, Underground, buses, throughout London
(Heathrow is in London) costs £12.50 I think. Probably you can get
one at Brighton Station. All travel within and around the airport
(including the fast shuttle - soon to be Crossrail) is free of charge.
Why on earth would I need one of those? What "fast shuttle"? On arrival,
a great deal of walking took me to a brief subway ride to passport control
and where I was met. (Then a coach to Oxford, which isn't necessarily
the same as the Terminal 5 tube stop; but I took the tube in '92 and
don't remember any "fast shuttle" between there and the gate.
There you are. You are thinking like Laura. Keep walking and you'll
eventually get to Oxford.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
And no, the clerk at Brighton Station (actually a Terminal)
ObAUE: "terminus" .
Post by Peter T. Daniels
...did not
indicate that any sort of Underground ticket could be purchased there.
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get a
Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is the
problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go everywhere?
There used to be a highwayman called Dick Turpin, and I'd trust
him with my bank card before I'd trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the boink. We
are back to the pre-boink PTD.
Why did you delete the last line? Is irony too difficult for you to
comprehend?
Not really, but it is *your* attitude, I think, that Tony was
referring to.
Whoosh.
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-22 02:59:05 UTC
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On Sat, 21 Jul 2018 19:54:11 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 21 Jul 2018 01:50:23 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 15:19:04 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
An Oyster card costs a couple of pounds to buy, and then you top it
up with however much you need. Buy it in any London newsagents, or at
Vitoria Station. I would strongly advise instead getting a paper "One Day
Travelcard" at Victoria, because the electronic "thinking" of the Oyster
(or swiping your bank card for that matter) is not terribly reliable.
Do you actually think that answered the question?
I do not want an Oyster Card.
I do not want a "One-Day Travelcard," whatever it may be made of.
I want to take a single trip, in one direction, lasting perhaps 47 minutes.
They'll get you on the Heathrow Express and you won't even know
the money has been taken out of your account :)
There is no "Heathrow Express" Underground line.
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
An off-peak Travelcard - trains, Underground, buses, throughout London
(Heathrow is in London) costs £12.50 I think. Probably you can get
one at Brighton Station. All travel within and around the airport
(including the fast shuttle - soon to be Crossrail) is free of charge.
Why on earth would I need one of those? What "fast shuttle"? On arrival,
a great deal of walking took me to a brief subway ride to passport control
and where I was met. (Then a coach to Oxford, which isn't necessarily
the same as the Terminal 5 tube stop; but I took the tube in '92 and
don't remember any "fast shuttle" between there and the gate.
There you are. You are thinking like Laura. Keep walking and you'll
eventually get to Oxford.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
And no, the clerk at Brighton Station (actually a Terminal)
ObAUE: "terminus" .
Post by Peter T. Daniels
...did not
indicate that any sort of Underground ticket could be purchased there.
It isn't an Underground ticket that you are purchasing. Get a
Travelcard which allows you to travel everywhere. WTF is the
problem with a cheap ticket that allows you to go everywhere?
There used to be a highwayman called Dick Turpin, and I'd trust
him with my bank card before I'd trust TFL.
Turpin was hanged at Tyburn in London - I'm only saying.
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the boink. We
are back to the pre-boink PTD.
Why did you delete the last line? Is irony too difficult for you to
comprehend?
Not really, but it is *your* attitude, I think, that Tony was
referring to.
Whoosh.
No, you just don't get it, Daniels.

Your irony is the point.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-07-21 11:05:57 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 15:19:04 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station
tomorrow, I will need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web
[]
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the boink. We
are back to the pre-boink PTD.
People try to help him and he's rude back; there's gratitude for you.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-22 02:49:39 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 15:19:04 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station
tomorrow, I will need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web
[]
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I DON'T FUCKING WANT TO "TRAVEL EVERYWHERE." I AM LEAVING THE COUNTRY.
Evidently, you used up all the charm you could manage at the boink. We
are back to the pre-boink PTD.
People try to help him and he's rude back; there's gratitude for you.
As usual, moronic "killfiler" doesn't know what he's talking about.
charles
2018-07-20 22:39:23 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station
tomorrow, I will need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site
tells me it will cost £3.10, and it goes on and on and on about
the glories of the Oyster Card, without telling me either how to
get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a simple one-way
ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and apparently
the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
An Oyster card costs a couple of pounds to buy, and then you top it
up with however much you need. Buy it in any London newsagents, or
at Vitoria Station. I would strongly advise instead getting a paper
"One Day Travelcard" at Victoria, because the electronic "thinking"
of the Oyster (or swiping your bank card for that matter) is not
terribly reliable.
Do you actually think that answered the question? I do not want an
Oyster Card. I do not want a "One-Day Travelcard," whatever it may be
made of. I want to take a single trip, in one direction, lasting
perhaps 47 minutes.
They'll get you on the Heathrow Express and you won't even know the
money has been taken out of your account :)
There is no "Heathrow Express" Underground line.
True - it is above ground until it gets very closse to the airport.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-20 14:47:48 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
If you're going straight through to Heathrow, not passing Go and not
collecting 200 pounds, just get a through ticket. You only need an Oyster
if your intent on another tour of Londinium.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
2. The hotel's lunch buffet had a more limited selection than yesterday, but
the tuna salad and the diced cheese were the same. The label for the former
read "tuna (fish)" and that for the latter, "cheese (dairy)." What helpful
allergen notices they are! The pudding, though, and here that label might be
apposite, was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick pastry shell
containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a decorative piece of maraschino
cherry. Not bad.
The unidentifiable layer should be frangipane, a baked almond paste.
However there are many variations of the Bakewell Tart, the bastard
invention of commercial bakeries. The genuine article, the Bakewell
Pudding, can be purchased only in Bakewell, Derbyshire sadly.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
3. In a shop window I passed on the way to learning where the railway
station is was a sign "staff required." In AmE, "help wanted." I could
understand "staff needed," but why "required"?
Because they can't continue to run the business without them?
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-20 17:36:28 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
If you're going straight through to Heathrow, not passing Go and not
collecting 200 pounds, just get a through ticket. You only need an Oyster
if your intent on another tour of Londinium.
That makes perfect sense. But how do I "get a through ticket"?
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
2. The hotel's lunch buffet had a more limited selection than yesterday, but
the tuna salad and the diced cheese were the same. The label for the former
read "tuna (fish)" and that for the latter, "cheese (dairy)." What helpful
allergen notices they are! The pudding, though, and here that label might be
apposite, was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick pastry shell
containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a decorative piece of maraschino
cherry. Not bad.
The unidentifiable layer should be frangipane, a baked almond paste.
Could be. Not identifiable as marzipan, though, a great favorite of mine.
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
However there are many variations of the Bakewell Tart, the bastard
invention of commercial bakeries. The genuine article, the Bakewell
Pudding, can be purchased only in Bakewell, Derbyshire sadly.
So does the tart count as a "pudding"?
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
3. In a shop window I passed on the way to learning where the railway
station is was a sign "staff required." In AmE, "help wanted." I could
understand "staff needed," but why "required"?
Because they can't continue to run the business without them?
They were open for business!
Peter Moylan
2018-07-22 14:03:50 UTC
Reply
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station
tomorrow, I will need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site
tells me it will cost £3.10, and it goes on and on and on about the
glories of the Oyster Card, without telling me either how to get
one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a simple one-way ticket
instead, and whether that might cost more; and apparently the free
Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
If you're going straight through to Heathrow, not passing Go and not
collecting 200 pounds, just get a through ticket. You only need an
Oyster if your intent on another tour of Londinium.
Finally, a responsive response. Was it really necessary for several
people to give misleading and/or unhelpful answers?

I too have been caught by unhelpful transport advertising in a strange
city. I don't want to know about the amazing options open to those who
by a Go Card or an Opal Card or a Mussel Card or whatever it's called
locally. I just want to known how to get from A to B.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
LFS
2018-07-20 15:45:46 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
If you have a contactless credit card you can use that, no need to get
an Oyster card.

https://tfl.gov.uk/fares-and-payments/contactless
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Harrison Hill
2018-07-20 16:04:25 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
If you have a contactless credit card you can use that, no need to get
an Oyster card.
If you are not going via Wimbledon, that might be
possible. Go anywhere near the tram-line, and they will mug
you. With lots of phone calls it might be possible to get the
money back (I couldn't be arsed). "Once mugged twice shy".

Madrigal's advice of a "through" ticket is good advice, but stay
on the Underground as you go through Padddington - unless you are
running late. It costs an extra £15 from Paddington on Heathrow Express.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-20 17:38:29 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
If you have a contactless credit card you can use that, no need to get
an Oyster card.
If you are not going via Wimbledon, that might be
possible. Go anywhere near the tram-line, and they will mug
you. With lots of phone calls it might be possible to get the
money back (I couldn't be arsed). "Once mugged twice shy".
Madrigal's advice of a "through" ticket is good advice, but stay
on the Underground as you go through Padddington - unless you are
running late. It costs an extra £15 from Paddington on Heathrow Express.
That sentence carries no meaning for me. I am to take the District Line
at Victoria Station, and change (same platform) to the Paddington Line
at Hammersmith.
Paul Wolff
2018-07-21 17:45:54 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
If you have a contactless credit card you can use that, no need to get
an Oyster card.
If you are not going via Wimbledon, that might be
possible. Go anywhere near the tram-line, and they will mug
you. With lots of phone calls it might be possible to get the
money back (I couldn't be arsed). "Once mugged twice shy".
Madrigal's advice of a "through" ticket is good advice, but stay
on the Underground as you go through Padddington - unless you are
running late. It costs an extra £15 from Paddington on Heathrow Express.
That sentence carries no meaning for me. I am to take the District Line
at Victoria Station, and change (same platform) to the Paddington Line
at Hammersmith.
I hope not. It's the Piccadilly Line that would take you from
Hammersmith to Heathrow.

There exists an Underground line which runs direct from Hammersmith to
Paddington, but it is absolutely what you do not want. If you sit on the
train for long enough past Paddington, it will carry you on to Victoria
and then through Paddington again, on a large loop below central London.

And I hope someone mentioned that the District Line has many branches,
not all of which pass through Hammersmith.
--
Paul
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-22 10:33:56 UTC
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Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
If you have a contactless credit card you can use that, no need to get
an Oyster card.
If you are not going via Wimbledon, that might be
possible. Go anywhere near the tram-line, and they will mug
you. With lots of phone calls it might be possible to get the
money back (I couldn't be arsed). "Once mugged twice shy".
Madrigal's advice of a "through" ticket is good advice, but stay
on the Underground as you go through Padddington - unless you are
running late. It costs an extra £15 from Paddington on Heathrow Express.
That sentence carries no meaning for me. I am to take the District Line
at Victoria Station, and change (same platform) to the Paddington Line
at Hammersmith.
I hope not. It's the Piccadilly Line that would take you from
Hammersmith to Heathrow.
Indeed. I was primed by the many, many occurrences of "Paddington" in
the preceding context.

As it happened, the journey was remarkably speedy. The next train out
when I got to the Brighton Station just happened to be the Gatwick
Express (11:48). 22 minutes to Gatwick; 2 minute stop; 33 minutes to
Victoria Station. Some interesting sights were seen from the train,
including the first tall buildings I saw in all of England: residential
towers just north of the South Croydon station. Since they were up
against the tracks, they are probably council flats.

But not much farther on, a lower but long building with entirely glass
walls that appeared from what I could see to be residences, but not one
of them had the drapes drawn (can it have been a hotel under construction
that is nearly completed?)

I was surprised to cross the Thames on a very wide railroad bridge,
rather than by tunnel.

The Underground's web site had lied to me: a one-way ticket to Heathrow
was not £3.10, but £6 (atrocious!). Fortunately there are many attendants
in the Tube complex there, and I learned that an Oyster Card would be
£5. The attendant at the turnstile ("barrier") for the District and
Circle Lines told me which District Line to take, and which Piccadilly
Line to take. In both cases, the right train was the first to come along.
The District Line cars are about the size of NYC's IRT trains (the
shorter, narrower of our two sizes), and the Piccadilly cars are tiny --
it must be one of the original lines made with the quite small bore
cylindrical tubes. The District Line is mostly open-cut; the Piccadilly
is mostly elevated at first and becomes a surface line before entering
the tunnel near the airport.

Don't ask about the airport. I shall never travel with BA again, and I
will avoid Heathrow as much as possible.
Post by Paul Wolff
There exists an Underground line which runs direct from Hammersmith to
Paddington, but it is absolutely what you do not want. If you sit on the
train for long enough past Paddington, it will carry you on to Victoria
and then through Paddington again, on a large loop below central London.
And I hope someone mentioned that the District Line has many branches,
not all of which pass through Hammersmith.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-20 17:37:04 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
1. When I take the train from Brighton to Victoria Station tomorrow, I will
need to take the Tube to Heathrow. The web site tells me it will cost £3.10,
and it goes on and on and on about the glories of the Oyster Card, without
telling me either how to get one, or what it costs, or whether I can get a
simple one-way ticket instead, and whether that might cost more; and
apparently the free Senior Fare applies only to residents of London.
If you have a contactless credit card you can use that, no need to get
an Oyster card.
https://tfl.gov.uk/fares-and-payments/contactless
No, we don't have that yet. Just chip cards.
Jerry Friedman
2018-07-20 18:56:44 UTC
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On 7/20/18 6:48 AM, Peter T. Daniels wrote:
...
Post by Peter T. Daniels
2. The hotel's lunch buffet had a more limited selection than yesterday, but
the tuna salad and the diced cheese were the same. The label for the former
read "tuna (fish)" and that for the latter, "cheese (dairy)."
...

Personally I'm fond of

100% Whole Wheat Bread

Ingredients: Whole wheat flour [etc.]

CONTAINS WHEAT
--
Jerry Friedman
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-07-21 11:08:06 UTC
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On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 18:56:44 GMT, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Peter T. Daniels
2. The hotel's lunch buffet had a more limited selection than
yesterday, but the tuna salad and the diced cheese were the same. The
label for the former read "tuna (fish)" and that for the latter,
"cheese (dairy)."
...
Personally I'm fond of
100% Whole Wheat Bread
Ingredients: Whole wheat flour [etc.]
CONTAINS WHEAT
Peanuts - processed in a factory that also handles nuts.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-07-21 11:15:19 UTC
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On Sat, 21 Jul 2018 11:08:06 -0000 (UTC), "Kerr-Mudd,John"
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 18:56:44 GMT, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Peter T. Daniels
2. The hotel's lunch buffet had a more limited selection than
yesterday, but the tuna salad and the diced cheese were the same. The
label for the former read "tuna (fish)" and that for the latter,
"cheese (dairy)."
...
Personally I'm fond of
100% Whole Wheat Bread
Ingredients: Whole wheat flour [etc.]
CONTAINS WHEAT
Peanuts - processed in a factory that also handles nuts.
Nytol Herbal Tablets (for the temporary relief of sleep distubances):
"This medicine may make you feel drowsy".
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-21 11:21:21 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 18:56:44 GMT, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Peter T. Daniels
2. The hotel's lunch buffet had a more limited selection than
yesterday, but the tuna salad and the diced cheese were the same. The
label for the former read "tuna (fish)" and that for the latter,
"cheese (dairy)."
...
Personally I'm fond of
100% Whole Wheat Bread
Ingredients: Whole wheat flour [etc.]
CONTAINS WHEAT
Peanuts - processed in a factory that also handles nuts.
Peanuts are not nuts. Not everybody who has a nut allergy
has a peanut allergy. This labelling is therefore essential
information for people who can eat peanuts safely but
have problems with some nuts. It is therefore entirely
inappropriate to mock it!
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-07-21 11:35:44 UTC
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On Sat, 21 Jul 2018 11:21:21 GMT, Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 18:56:44 GMT, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Peter T. Daniels
2. The hotel's lunch buffet had a more limited selection than
yesterday, but the tuna salad and the diced cheese were the same. The
label for the former read "tuna (fish)" and that for the latter,
"cheese (dairy)."
...
Personally I'm fond of
100% Whole Wheat Bread
Ingredients: Whole wheat flour [etc.]
CONTAINS WHEAT
Peanuts - processed in a factory that also handles nuts.
Peanuts are not nuts. Not everybody who has a nut allergy
has a peanut allergy. This labelling is therefore essential
information for people who can eat peanuts safely but
have problems with some nuts. It is therefore entirely
inappropriate to mock it!
I was being ironical

Did you know that spiders are not, in fact, insects? </E.L. Wisty mode>
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-21 11:56:08 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Sat, 21 Jul 2018 11:21:21 GMT, Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 18:56:44 GMT, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Peter T. Daniels
2. The hotel's lunch buffet had a more limited selection than
yesterday, but the tuna salad and the diced cheese were the same.
The
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
label for the former read "tuna (fish)" and that for the latter,
"cheese (dairy)."
...
Personally I'm fond of
100% Whole Wheat Bread
Ingredients: Whole wheat flour [etc.]
CONTAINS WHEAT
Peanuts - processed in a factory that also handles nuts.
Peanuts are not nuts. Not everybody who has a nut allergy
has a peanut allergy. This labelling is therefore essential
information for people who can eat peanuts safely but
have problems with some nuts. It is therefore entirely
inappropriate to mock it!
I was being ironical
Did you know that spiders are not, in fact, insects? </E.L. Wisty mode>
Pah! Spider religion is famously sectarian!
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-21 16:02:07 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
[ … ]
I was being ironical
Did you know that spiders are not, in fact, insects? </E.L. Wisty mode>
Some years ago a colleague tried to convince us not only that spiders
were not insects (as any fule kno), but their lineages separated so
long ago that they're more closely related to cabbages than they are to
insects. This was a highly intelligent and knowledgeable person, so
you're wondering how a highly intelligent and knowledgeable person
could believe anything so absurd. He was making the mistake that is
often made of assuming that some character (in this case the
stereospecificity of lactate dehydrogenase) was like the Laws of the
Medes and the Persians, and that organisms that differed in it must be
extremely remotely related.
--
athel
Ken Blake
2018-07-21 18:38:19 UTC
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On Sat, 21 Jul 2018 18:02:07 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
[ … ]
I was being ironical
Did you know that spiders are not, in fact, insects? </E.L. Wisty mode>
Some years ago a colleague tried to convince us not only that spiders
were not insects (as any fule kno), but their lineages separated so
long ago that they're more closely related to cabbages than they are to
insects.
He must have been thinking of Cleome gynandra, aka Spider plant and
African cabbage <G>

See
http://blogs.worldwatch.org/nourishingtheplanet/spider-plant-a-hardy-and-nutritious-african-native/
Sam Plusnet
2018-07-22 00:08:08 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
[ … ]
I was being ironical
Did you know that spiders are not, in fact, insects? </E.L. Wisty mode>
Some years ago a colleague tried to convince us not only that spiders
were not insects (as any fule kno), but their lineages separated so long
ago that they're more closely related to cabbages than they are to
insects. This was a highly intelligent and knowledgeable person, so
you're wondering how a highly intelligent and knowledgeable person could
believe anything so absurd. He was making the mistake that is often made
of assuming that some character (in this case the stereospecificity of
lactate dehydrogenase) was like the Laws of the Medes and the Persians,
and that organisms that differed in it must be extremely remotely related.
Nonsense indeed. Everyone knows they're related to pineapples.

(Or was it bananas?)
--
Sam Plusnet
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-21 15:43:06 UTC
Reply
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On Sat, 21 Jul 2018 11:08:06 -0000 (UTC), "Kerr-Mudd,John"
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
On Fri, 20 Jul 2018 18:56:44 GMT, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
...
Post by Peter T. Daniels
2. The hotel's lunch buffet had a more limited selection than
yesterday, but the tuna salad and the diced cheese were the same. The
label for the former read "tuna (fish)" and that for the latter,
"cheese (dairy)."
...
Personally I'm fond of
100% Whole Wheat Bread
Ingredients: Whole wheat flour [etc.]
CONTAINS WHEAT
Peanuts - processed in a factory that also handles nuts.
I quit.
Don P
2018-07-23 20:35:38 UTC
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. . . The pudding, though, and here that label might be > apposite, was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick
pastry shell> containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an
unidentifiable layer, and a> thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a
decorative piece of maraschino> cherry. Not bad.
Bakewell is a place name in the English midlands. The filling of the
Bakewell tart is almond paste -- an expensive confectionery, unwisely
eked by inferior bakers.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-24 02:44:00 UTC
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[Don's attributions almost as screwed up as Brader's]
Post by Don P
. . . The pudding, though, and here that label might be > apposite, was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick
pastry shell> containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an
unidentifiable layer, and a> thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a
decorative piece of maraschino> cherry. Not bad.
Bakewell is a place name in the English midlands. The filling of the
Bakewell tart is almond paste -- an expensive confectionery, unwisely
eked by inferior bakers.
"I do not think [that word] means what you think it means."
LFS
2018-07-24 06:44:36 UTC
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Post by Don P
. . . The pudding, though, and here that label might be > apposite,
was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick
pastry shell> containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an
unidentifiable layer, and a> thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a
decorative piece of maraschino> cherry. Not bad.
Bakewell is a place name in the English midlands.  The filling of the
Bakewell tart is almond paste -- an expensive confectionery, unwisely
eked by inferior bakers.
Hello, Don!

The filling of a Bakewell tart is not almond paste - which usually means
marzipan - but frangipane, a form of pastry cream flavoured with almonds.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-24 10:56:04 UTC
Reply
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Post by LFS
Post by Don P
. . . The pudding, though, and here that label might be > apposite,
was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick
pastry shell> containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an
unidentifiable layer, and a> thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a
decorative piece of maraschino> cherry. Not bad.
Bakewell is a place name in the English midlands.  The filling of the
Bakewell tart is almond paste -- an expensive confectionery, unwisely
eked by inferior bakers.
Hello, Don!
The filling of a Bakewell tart is not almond paste - which usually means
marzipan - but frangipane, a form of pastry cream flavoured with almonds.
Frangipane IS an almond paste.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-24 12:55:06 UTC
Reply
Permalink
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
The pudding, though, and here that label might be > apposite,
no one's commented on this possible use of "pudding" for a tart
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick
pastry shell> containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an
unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a
decorative piece of maraschino> cherry. Not bad.
Bakewell is a placename in the English midlands. The filling of the
Bakewell tart is almond paste--an expensive confectionery, unwisely
eked by inferior bakers.
Hello, Don!
The filling of a Bakewell tart is not almond paste - which usually means
marzipan - but frangipane, a form of pastry cream flavoured with almonds.
Frangipane IS an almond paste.
If pressed, LFS will probably explain the distinction between "paste"
and "pastry cream."
LFS
2018-07-24 15:14:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
The pudding, though, and here that label might be > apposite,
no one's commented on this possible use of "pudding" for a tart
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick
pastry shell> containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an
unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a
decorative piece of maraschino> cherry. Not bad.
Bakewell is a placename in the English midlands. The filling of the
Bakewell tart is almond paste--an expensive confectionery, unwisely
eked by inferior bakers.
Hello, Don!
The filling of a Bakewell tart is not almond paste - which usually means
marzipan - but frangipane, a form of pastry cream flavoured with almonds.
Frangipane IS an almond paste.
If pressed, LFS will probably explain the distinction between "paste"
and "pastry cream."
No, she won't, she CBA.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-24 16:55:38 UTC
Reply
Permalink
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Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
The pudding, though, and here that label might be > apposite,
no one's commented on this possible use of "pudding" for a tart
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick
pastry shell> containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an
unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a
decorative piece of maraschino> cherry. Not bad.
Bakewell is a placename in the English midlands. The filling of the
Bakewell tart is almond paste--an expensive confectionery, unwisely
eked by inferior bakers.
Hello, Don!
The filling of a Bakewell tart is not almond paste - which usually means
marzipan - but frangipane, a form of pastry cream flavoured with almonds.
Frangipane IS an almond paste.
If pressed, LFS will probably explain the distinction between "paste"
and "pastry cream."
No, she won't, she CBA.
It's a no-brainer.

It is not pure almond paste. It is a mixture of butter, cream,
sugar, eggs, and ground almonds.

In the same sense as horseradish and horseradish cream.
Harrison Hill
2018-07-24 17:20:12 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
The pudding, though, and here that label might be > apposite,
no one's commented on this possible use of "pudding" for a tart
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick
pastry shell> containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an
unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a
decorative piece of maraschino> cherry. Not bad.
Bakewell is a placename in the English midlands. The filling of the
Bakewell tart is almond paste--an expensive confectionery, unwisely
eked by inferior bakers.
Hello, Don!
The filling of a Bakewell tart is not almond paste - which usually means
marzipan - but frangipane, a form of pastry cream flavoured with almonds.
Frangipane IS an almond paste.
If pressed, LFS will probably explain the distinction between "paste"
and "pastry cream."
No, she won't, she CBA.
It's a no-brainer.
It is not pure almond paste. It is a mixture of butter, cream,
sugar, eggs, and ground almonds.
In the same sense as horseradish and horseradish cream.
You are arguing with a woman - an accountant at that!

They will never concede. That's why I've chosen Janet - as my
newly adopted mother - to give me guidance on this sort of
grammatical correctness.

You've missed out "horseradish sauce". I expect she might say.
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-24 17:33:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Tue, 24 Jul 2018 10:20:12 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
The pudding, though, and here that label might be > apposite,
no one's commented on this possible use of "pudding" for a tart
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick
pastry shell> containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an
unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a
decorative piece of maraschino> cherry. Not bad.
Bakewell is a placename in the English midlands. The filling of the
Bakewell tart is almond paste--an expensive confectionery, unwisely
eked by inferior bakers.
Hello, Don!
The filling of a Bakewell tart is not almond paste - which usually means
marzipan - but frangipane, a form of pastry cream flavoured with almonds.
Frangipane IS an almond paste.
If pressed, LFS will probably explain the distinction between "paste"
and "pastry cream."
No, she won't, she CBA.
It's a no-brainer.
It is not pure almond paste. It is a mixture of butter, cream,
sugar, eggs, and ground almonds.
In the same sense as horseradish and horseradish cream.
You are arguing with a woman - an accountant at that!
They will never concede. That's why I've chosen Janet - as my
newly adopted mother - to give me guidance on this sort of
grammatical correctness.
You will fall into a depressed comma.
Post by Harrison Hill
You've missed out "horseradish sauce". I expect she might say.
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcRzEwPnTQfAan7GXg8qXxhYom3RW94PTEU46tQXFOOqccCKgJM1uQ

Also, I see "horseradish cream sauce"
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-24 17:38:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by LFS
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
The pudding, though, and here that label might be > apposite,
no one's commented on this possible use of "pudding" for a tart
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick
pastry shell> containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an
unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a
decorative piece of maraschino> cherry. Not bad.
Bakewell is a placename in the English midlands. The filling of the
Bakewell tart is almond paste--an expensive confectionery, unwisely
eked by inferior bakers.
Hello, Don!
The filling of a Bakewell tart is not almond paste - which usually means
marzipan - but frangipane, a form of pastry cream flavoured with almonds.
Frangipane IS an almond paste.
If pressed, LFS will probably explain the distinction between "paste"
and "pastry cream."
No, she won't, she CBA.
It's a no-brainer.
It is not pure almond paste. It is a mixture of butter, cream,
sugar, eggs, and ground almonds.
In the same sense as horseradish and horseradish cream.
You are arguing with a woman - an accountant at that!
They will never concede. That's why I've chosen Janet - as my
newly adopted mother - to give me guidance on this sort of
grammatical correctness.
You've missed out "horseradish sauce". I expect she might say.
I took "horseradish cream" to be BrE for what we call "horseradish sauce."
Are they, instead, different things?

Horseradish sauce is a condiment for e.g. Prime Rib.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-28 03:02:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
The pudding, though, and here that label might be > apposite,
no one's commented on this possible use of "pudding" for a tart
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick
pastry shell> containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an
unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a
decorative piece of maraschino> cherry. Not bad.
Bakewell is a placename in the English midlands. The filling of the
Bakewell tart is almond paste--an expensive confectionery, unwisely
eked by inferior bakers.
Hello, Don!
The filling of a Bakewell tart is not almond paste - which usually means
marzipan - but frangipane, a form of pastry cream flavoured with almonds.
Frangipane IS an almond paste.
If pressed, LFS will probably explain the distinction between "paste"
and "pastry cream."
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.

The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.) Most of them did
"Chelsea buns" (not defined), though one of them did "lardy buns" (defined
as an invention for using up leftover lard). But one of the Chelsea buns
was a Bakewell bun, and the new word "frangipan" (three syllables only)
was used, and also "almond extract." It also involved sour cherry jam.

The "technical bake" was "jam doughnuts." Since there was apparently very
little worth seeing about the candidates' attempts to make donuts, they
had a mini-documentary explaining that donuts were introduced to Britain
in WWI by the Salvation Army to keep the AEF happy, and by the Red Cross
in WWII to keep the GIs happy, who were served by "doughnut dollies." (And
there was an extensive convoy of Red Cross donut-cooking trucks that
followed the troops from D-Day to VE Day almost a year later.) NB I can't
say you "bake" donuts, since they're deep-fried, not baked.

Since donuts are an American thing -- it was clear that not even the
sainted "Paul" (whoever he is) had never seen a proper jelly donut (nor
did he know what to call it) -- only one of the seven had ever made any
before, and he in fact won the segment. Their donuts were nearly spherical
and had far too much "jam" in them, so that it was dribbling out of almost
every one of the 70 donuts presented for judging. Paul & Mary even com-
plained that the one set that looked a bit like actual jelly donuts were
"too flat."

The "showstopper bake" was "celeBRAtory loaf" (undefined); several of them made stollen. Unfortunately I apparently fell asleep just after they were
showing each of the bakers turning their "loaves" out of the pans, so I
missed the decorating and the judging entirely. Woke up three minutes into
the American Masters episode about Ted Williams, which I had planned to
watch but didn't, coming here instead.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-28 11:55:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
The pudding, though, and here that label might be > apposite,
no one's commented on this possible use of "pudding" for a tart
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick
pastry shell> containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an
unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a
decorative piece of maraschino> cherry. Not bad.
Bakewell is a placename in the English midlands. The filling of the
Bakewell tart is almond paste--an expensive confectionery, unwisely
eked by inferior bakers.
Hello, Don!
The filling of a Bakewell tart is not almond paste - which usually means
marzipan - but frangipane, a form of pastry cream flavoured with almonds.
Frangipane IS an almond paste.
If pressed, LFS will probably explain the distinction between "paste"
and "pastry cream."
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.) Most of them did
"Chelsea buns" (not defined), though one of them did "lardy buns" (defined
as an invention for using up leftover lard). But one of the Chelsea buns
was a Bakewell bun, and the new word "frangipan" (three syllables only)
was used, and also "almond extract." It also involved sour cherry jam.
The "technical bake" was "jam doughnuts." Since there was apparently very
little worth seeing about the candidates' attempts to make donuts, they
had a mini-documentary explaining that donuts were introduced to Britain
in WWI by the Salvation Army to keep the AEF happy, and by the Red Cross
in WWII to keep the GIs happy, who were served by "doughnut dollies." (And
there was an extensive convoy of Red Cross donut-cooking trucks that
followed the troops from D-Day to VE Day almost a year later.) NB I can't
say you "bake" donuts, since they're deep-fried, not baked.
Since donuts are an American thing -- it was clear that not even the
sainted "Paul" (whoever he is) had never seen a proper jelly donut (nor
did he know what to call it) -- only one of the seven had ever made any
before, and he in fact won the segment. Their donuts were nearly spherical
and had far too much "jam" in them, so that it was dribbling out of almost
every one of the 70 donuts presented for judging. Paul & Mary even com-
plained that the one set that looked a bit like actual jelly donuts were
"too flat."
The "showstopper bake" was "celeBRAtory loaf" (undefined); several of them made stollen. Unfortunately I apparently fell asleep just after they were
showing each of the bakers turning their "loaves" out of the pans, so I
missed the decorating and the judging entirely. Woke up three minutes into
the American Masters episode about Ted Williams, which I had planned to
watch but didn't, coming here instead.
Bun, by the strictest definition, is an individual item of baked, sweet, yeast
dough. Traditionally it contains dried fruit and may, as in the case of the
hot cross bun, also be spiced. A Chelsea bun is distinguished by the method
of rolling the dough around the fruit so that it forms a spiral (like a slice
of swiss roll/ roulade).
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-28 13:16:19 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
The pudding, though, and here that label might be > apposite,
no one's commented on this possible use of "pudding" for a tart
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick
pastry shell> containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an
unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a
decorative piece of maraschino> cherry. Not bad.
Bakewell is a placename in the English midlands. The filling of the
Bakewell tart is almond paste--an expensive confectionery, unwisely
eked by inferior bakers.
Hello, Don!
The filling of a Bakewell tart is not almond paste - which usually means
marzipan - but frangipane, a form of pastry cream flavoured with almonds.
Frangipane IS an almond paste.
If pressed, LFS will probably explain the distinction between "paste"
and "pastry cream."
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.) Most of them did
"Chelsea buns" (not defined), though one of them did "lardy buns" (defined
as an invention for using up leftover lard). But one of the Chelsea buns
was a Bakewell bun, and the new word "frangipan" (three syllables only)
was used, and also "almond extract." It also involved sour cherry jam.
The "technical bake" was "jam doughnuts." Since there was apparently very
little worth seeing about the candidates' attempts to make donuts, they
had a mini-documentary explaining that donuts were introduced to Britain
in WWI by the Salvation Army to keep the AEF happy, and by the Red Cross
in WWII to keep the GIs happy, who were served by "doughnut dollies." (And
there was an extensive convoy of Red Cross donut-cooking trucks that
followed the troops from D-Day to VE Day almost a year later.) NB I can't
say you "bake" donuts, since they're deep-fried, not baked.
Since donuts are an American thing -- it was clear that not even the
sainted "Paul" (whoever he is) had never seen a proper jelly donut (nor
did he know what to call it) -- only one of the seven had ever made any
before, and he in fact won the segment. Their donuts were nearly spherical
and had far too much "jam" in them, so that it was dribbling out of almost
every one of the 70 donuts presented for judging. Paul & Mary even com-
plained that the one set that looked a bit like actual jelly donuts were
"too flat."
The "showstopper bake" was "celeBRAtory loaf" (undefined); several of them made stollen. Unfortunately I apparently fell asleep just after they were
showing each of the bakers turning their "loaves" out of the pans, so I
missed the decorating and the judging entirely. Woke up three minutes into
the American Masters episode about Ted Williams, which I had planned to
watch but didn't, coming here instead.
Bun, by the strictest definition, is an individual item of baked, sweet, yeast
dough. Traditionally it contains dried fruit and may, as in the case of the
hot cross bun, also be spiced. A Chelsea bun is distinguished by the method
of rolling the dough around the fruit so that it forms a spiral (like a slice
of swiss roll/ roulade).
When those are commercially available, they tend to be called "whirls" or
"swirls." What would the Chelsea connection be?

("Jelly rolls" are rolled up similarly _after_ they're baked; the filling
can be jelly (BrE jam) and/or "creme" or the legitimate forebears of it.)

Alas you only got to the first two words.
Katy Jennison
2018-07-28 14:07:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
The pudding, though, and here that label might be > apposite,
no one's commented on this possible use of "pudding" for a tart
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick
pastry shell> containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an
unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a
decorative piece of maraschino> cherry. Not bad.
Bakewell is a placename in the English midlands. The filling of the
Bakewell tart is almond paste--an expensive confectionery, unwisely
eked by inferior bakers.
Hello, Don!
The filling of a Bakewell tart is not almond paste - which usually means
marzipan - but frangipane, a form of pastry cream flavoured with almonds.
Frangipane IS an almond paste.
If pressed, LFS will probably explain the distinction between "paste"
and "pastry cream."
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.) Most of them did
"Chelsea buns" (not defined), though one of them did "lardy buns" (defined
as an invention for using up leftover lard). But one of the Chelsea buns
was a Bakewell bun, and the new word "frangipan" (three syllables only)
was used, and also "almond extract." It also involved sour cherry jam.
The "technical bake" was "jam doughnuts." Since there was apparently very
little worth seeing about the candidates' attempts to make donuts, they
had a mini-documentary explaining that donuts were introduced to Britain
in WWI by the Salvation Army to keep the AEF happy, and by the Red Cross
in WWII to keep the GIs happy, who were served by "doughnut dollies." (And
there was an extensive convoy of Red Cross donut-cooking trucks that
followed the troops from D-Day to VE Day almost a year later.) NB I can't
say you "bake" donuts, since they're deep-fried, not baked.
Since donuts are an American thing -- it was clear that not even the
sainted "Paul" (whoever he is) had never seen a proper jelly donut (nor
did he know what to call it) -- only one of the seven had ever made any
before, and he in fact won the segment. Their donuts were nearly spherical
and had far too much "jam" in them, so that it was dribbling out of almost
every one of the 70 donuts presented for judging. Paul & Mary even com-
plained that the one set that looked a bit like actual jelly donuts were
"too flat."
The "showstopper bake" was "celeBRAtory loaf" (undefined); several of them made stollen. Unfortunately I apparently fell asleep just after they were
showing each of the bakers turning their "loaves" out of the pans, so I
missed the decorating and the judging entirely. Woke up three minutes into
the American Masters episode about Ted Williams, which I had planned to
watch but didn't, coming here instead.
Bun, by the strictest definition, is an individual item of baked, sweet, yeast
dough. Traditionally it contains dried fruit and may, as in the case of the
hot cross bun, also be spiced. A Chelsea bun is distinguished by the method
of rolling the dough around the fruit so that it forms a spiral (like a slice
of swiss roll/ roulade).
And just to clarify: donuts may be an American thing, but doughnuts are
British. An AmE jelly donut is not the same as a BrE jam doughnut. BrE
doughnuts are indeed pretty nearly spherical.

Now, if the contestants had been asked to make an American jelly donut ...
--
Katy Jennison
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-28 14:56:40 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
[ … ]
And just to clarify: donuts may be an American thing, but doughnuts are
British. An AmE jelly donut is not the same as a BrE jam doughnut.
BrE doughnuts are indeed pretty nearly spherical.
In topological terms they are indeed spherical. I was very puzzled when
I first read articles (for example in Scientific American -- a much
better magazine in the 1960s than it is today) describing particle
accelerators as "donut-shaped", because I couldn't see what was special
about the shape of a doughnut.

When I went on a school trip to Leningrad and Moscow in 1960 there were
17 of us, including two teachers. One of the teachers could make
himself understood in Russian, and when we came across a chap selling
doughnuts (doughnut-shaped, not donut-shaped) and tea on the street he
asked for 66 doughnuts and 17 cups of tea. The seller didn't turn a
hair for the 66 doughnuts but had difficulty understanding why anyone
would want 17 cups of tea. I don't remember where the 66 came from:
maybe two people said they didn't want four. They were rather small
doughnuts by British standards.
Post by Katy Jennison
Now, if the contestants had been asked to make an American jelly donut ...
--
athel
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-28 16:19:39 UTC
Reply
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On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 15:07:52 +0100, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
The pudding, though, and here that label might be > apposite,
no one's commented on this possible use of "pudding" for a tart
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by LFS
Post by Don P
was a "teatime bakewell tart," comprising a too-thick
pastry shell> containing a thin layer of (cherry?) jam, an
unidentifiable layer, and a
thin coating of, perhaps, custard holding a
decorative piece of maraschino> cherry. Not bad.
Bakewell is a placename in the English midlands. The filling of the
Bakewell tart is almond paste--an expensive confectionery, unwisely
eked by inferior bakers.
Hello, Don!
The filling of a Bakewell tart is not almond paste - which usually means
marzipan - but frangipane, a form of pastry cream flavoured with almonds.
Frangipane IS an almond paste.
If pressed, LFS will probably explain the distinction between "paste"
and "pastry cream."
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.) Most of them did
"Chelsea buns" (not defined), though one of them did "lardy buns" (defined
as an invention for using up leftover lard). But one of the Chelsea buns
was a Bakewell bun, and the new word "frangipan" (three syllables only)
was used, and also "almond extract." It also involved sour cherry jam.
The "technical bake" was "jam doughnuts." Since there was apparently very
little worth seeing about the candidates' attempts to make donuts, they
had a mini-documentary explaining that donuts were introduced to Britain
in WWI by the Salvation Army to keep the AEF happy, and by the Red Cross
in WWII to keep the GIs happy, who were served by "doughnut dollies." (And
there was an extensive convoy of Red Cross donut-cooking trucks that
followed the troops from D-Day to VE Day almost a year later.) NB I can't
say you "bake" donuts, since they're deep-fried, not baked.
Since donuts are an American thing -- it was clear that not even the
sainted "Paul" (whoever he is) had never seen a proper jelly donut (nor
did he know what to call it) -- only one of the seven had ever made any
before, and he in fact won the segment. Their donuts were nearly spherical
and had far too much "jam" in them, so that it was dribbling out of almost
every one of the 70 donuts presented for judging. Paul & Mary even com-
plained that the one set that looked a bit like actual jelly donuts were
"too flat."
The "showstopper bake" was "celeBRAtory loaf" (undefined); several of them made stollen. Unfortunately I apparently fell asleep just after they were
showing each of the bakers turning their "loaves" out of the pans, so I
missed the decorating and the judging entirely. Woke up three minutes into
the American Masters episode about Ted Williams, which I had planned to
watch but didn't, coming here instead.
Bun, by the strictest definition, is an individual item of baked, sweet, yeast
dough. Traditionally it contains dried fruit and may, as in the case of the
hot cross bun, also be spiced. A Chelsea bun is distinguished by the method
of rolling the dough around the fruit so that it forms a spiral (like a slice
of swiss roll/ roulade).
And just to clarify: donuts may be an American thing, but doughnuts are
British. An AmE jelly donut is not the same as a BrE jam doughnut. BrE
doughnuts are indeed pretty nearly spherical.
"Doughnut is the traditional spelling and still dominates even in the
United States", though 'donut' is often used." (Wiki)

M-W: "donut" - less common spelling of 'doughnut'.
Post by Katy Jennison
Now, if the contestants had been asked to make an American jelly donut ...
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/National_Doughnut_Day
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-28 17:04:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.) Most of them did
"Chelsea buns" (not defined), though one of them did "lardy buns" (defined
as an invention for using up leftover lard). But one of the Chelsea buns
was a Bakewell bun, and the new word "frangipan" (three syllables only)
was used, and also "almond extract." It also involved sour cherry jam.
The "technical bake" was "jam doughnuts." Since there was apparently very
little worth seeing about the candidates' attempts to make donuts, they
had a mini-documentary explaining that donuts were introduced to Britain
in WWI by the Salvation Army to keep the AEF happy, and by the Red Cross
in WWII to keep the GIs happy, who were served by "doughnut dollies." (And
there was an extensive convoy of Red Cross donut-cooking trucks that
followed the troops from D-Day to VE Day almost a year later.) NB I can't
say you "bake" donuts, since they're deep-fried, not baked.
Since donuts are an American thing -- it was clear that not even the
sainted "Paul" (whoever he is) had ever seen a proper jelly donut (nor
did he know what to call it) -- only one of the seven had ever made any
before, and he in fact won the segment. Their donuts were nearly spherical
and had far too much "jam" in them, so that it was dribbling out of almost
every one of the 70 donuts presented for judging. Paul & Mary even com-
plained that the one set that looked a bit like actual jelly donuts were
"too flat."
The "showstopper bake" was "celeBRAtory loaf" (undefined); several of them made stollen. Unfortunately I apparently fell asleep just after they were
showing each of the bakers turning their "loaves" out of the pans, so I
missed the decorating and the judging entirely. Woke up three minutes into
the American Masters episode about Ted Williams, which I had planned to
watch but didn't, coming here instead.
Bun, by the strictest definition, is an individual item of baked, sweet, yeast
dough. Traditionally it contains dried fruit and may, as in the case of the
hot cross bun, also be spiced. A Chelsea bun is distinguished by the method
of rolling the dough around the fruit so that it forms a spiral (like a slice
of swiss roll/ roulade).
And just to clarify: donuts may be an American thing, but doughnuts are
British. An AmE jelly donut is not the same as a BrE jam doughnut. BrE
doughnuts are indeed pretty nearly spherical.
Now, if the contestants had been asked to make an American jelly donut ...
Six of the seven of them were unfamiliar with them. In the "technical
bake," they're given the ingredients for a (hopefully) unfamiliar item
and _partial_ recipe instructions. The mini-documentary in the middle
made it clear that "doughnuts" were exclusively associated with US
soldiers and were made, in the distant past, only to keep them happy.
Janet
2018-07-28 15:27:43 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.)
Male buttock

Most of them did
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Chelsea buns" (not defined),
Buttocks of upmarket male
Post by Peter T. Daniels
though one of them did "lardy buns"
Obese buttocks

You need a DVR recorder so that you can record TV broadcasts and
replay them whenever and as often as you like, dictionary in hand.

Janet.
Tony Cooper
2018-07-28 16:13:08 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.)
Male buttock
Most of them did
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Chelsea buns" (not defined),
Buttocks of upmarket male
Post by Peter T. Daniels
though one of them did "lardy buns"
Obese buttocks
You need a DVR recorder so that you can record TV broadcasts and
replay them whenever and as often as you like, dictionary in hand.
Or a keyboard that can be used to search for information. Typing in
"Chelsea buns" provides photographs, recipes, and why it is called a
"Chelsea bun". The same technique works for "lardy buns" and results
in photographs, recipes, and other names for the lardy bun.

It's interesting to discuss otherpondian food products, but to remain
ignorant when the explanatory information is so accessible is
inexcusable.

The simple search method uncovers interesting facts, too. For
example, the Chelsea bun was a feature of the Chelsea Bun House on
Jew's Row in the 18th century. Jonathan Swift wrote about a visit to
the Chelsea Bun House:

"A fine day, but begins to grow a little warm; and that makes your
little fat Presto sweat in the forehead. Pray, are not the fine buns
sold here in our town; was it not Rrrrrrrrrare Chelsea buns? I bought
one to-day in my walk; it cost me a penny; it was stale, and I did not
like it, as the man said, &c."

That did stump me, though. "Presto sweat"? Google is of no help.

For a food product to be named for the place where it was either
famous or first made is not unusual. The "Parker House roll" is an
American example as is a "Waldorf salad".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-28 16:26:41 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.)
Male buttock
Most of them did
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Chelsea buns" (not defined),
Buttocks of upmarket male
Post by Peter T. Daniels
though one of them did "lardy buns"
Obese buttocks
You need a DVR recorder so that you can record TV broadcasts and
replay them whenever and as often as you like, dictionary in hand.
Or a keyboard that can be used to search for information. Typing in
"Chelsea buns" provides photographs, recipes, and why it is called a
"Chelsea bun". The same technique works for "lardy buns" and results
in photographs, recipes, and other names for the lardy bun.
It's interesting to discuss otherpondian food products, but to remain
ignorant when the explanatory information is so accessible is
inexcusable.
The simple search method uncovers interesting facts, too. For
example, the Chelsea bun was a feature of the Chelsea Bun House on
Jew's Row in the 18th century. Jonathan Swift wrote about a visit to
"A fine day, but begins to grow a little warm; and that makes your
little fat Presto sweat in the forehead. Pray, are not the fine buns
sold here in our town; was it not Rrrrrrrrrare Chelsea buns? I bought
one to-day in my walk; it cost me a penny; it was stale, and I did not
like it, as the man said, &c."
That did stump me, though. "Presto sweat"? Google is of no help.
For a food product to be named for the place where it was either
famous or first made is not unusual. The "Parker House roll" is an
American example as is a "Waldorf salad".
Given that it is capitalised, might one suggests that Presto is simply
a nickname for himself?
Tony Cooper
2018-07-28 16:43:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 09:26:41 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.)
Male buttock
Most of them did
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Chelsea buns" (not defined),
Buttocks of upmarket male
Post by Peter T. Daniels
though one of them did "lardy buns"
Obese buttocks
You need a DVR recorder so that you can record TV broadcasts and
replay them whenever and as often as you like, dictionary in hand.
Or a keyboard that can be used to search for information. Typing in
"Chelsea buns" provides photographs, recipes, and why it is called a
"Chelsea bun". The same technique works for "lardy buns" and results
in photographs, recipes, and other names for the lardy bun.
It's interesting to discuss otherpondian food products, but to remain
ignorant when the explanatory information is so accessible is
inexcusable.
The simple search method uncovers interesting facts, too. For
example, the Chelsea bun was a feature of the Chelsea Bun House on
Jew's Row in the 18th century. Jonathan Swift wrote about a visit to
"A fine day, but begins to grow a little warm; and that makes your
little fat Presto sweat in the forehead. Pray, are not the fine buns
sold here in our town; was it not Rrrrrrrrrare Chelsea buns? I bought
one to-day in my walk; it cost me a penny; it was stale, and I did not
like it, as the man said, &c."
That did stump me, though. "Presto sweat"? Google is of no help.
For a food product to be named for the place where it was either
famous or first made is not unusual. The "Parker House roll" is an
American example as is a "Waldorf salad".
Given that it is capitalised, might one suggests that Presto is simply
a nickname for himself?
You are correct, Sir. I neglected to use "jonathan swift presto" as a
search term. That results in finding:

http://www.gutenberg.org/files/4208/4208-h/4208-h.htm

"He substituted for “Ppt” the word “Stella,” a name which Swift seems
not to have used until some years later; he adopted the name “Presto”
for Swift, and in other ways tried to give a greater literary finish
to the letters. The whole of the correspondence was first brought
together, under the title of the Journal to Stella, in Sheridan’s
edition of 1784."

My bad.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-28 17:17:31 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 09:26:41 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.)
Male buttock
Most of them did
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Chelsea buns" (not defined),
Buttocks of upmarket male
Post by Peter T. Daniels
though one of them did "lardy buns"
Obese buttocks
You need a DVR recorder so that you can record TV broadcasts and
replay them whenever and as often as you like, dictionary in hand.
Or a keyboard that can be used to search for information. Typing in
"Chelsea buns" provides photographs, recipes, and why it is called a
"Chelsea bun". The same technique works for "lardy buns" and results
in photographs, recipes, and other names for the lardy bun.
It's interesting to discuss otherpondian food products, but to remain
ignorant when the explanatory information is so accessible is
inexcusable.
The simple search method uncovers interesting facts, too. For
example, the Chelsea bun was a feature of the Chelsea Bun House on
Jew's Row in the 18th century. Jonathan Swift wrote about a visit to
"A fine day, but begins to grow a little warm; and that makes your
little fat Presto sweat in the forehead. Pray, are not the fine buns
sold here in our town; was it not Rrrrrrrrrare Chelsea buns? I bought
one to-day in my walk; it cost me a penny; it was stale, and I did not
like it, as the man said, &c."
That did stump me, though. "Presto sweat"? Google is of no help.
For a food product to be named for the place where it was either
famous or first made is not unusual. The "Parker House roll" is an
American example as is a "Waldorf salad".
Given that it is capitalised, might one suggests that Presto is simply
a nickname for himself?
You are correct, Sir. I neglected to use "jonathan swift presto" as a
http://www.gutenberg.org/files/4208/4208-h/4208-h.htm
"He substituted for “Ppt” the word “Stella,” a name which Swift seems
not to have used until some years later; he adopted the name “Presto”
for Swift, and in other ways tried to give a greater literary finish
to the letters. The whole of the correspondence was first brought
together, under the title of the Journal to Stella, in Sheridan’s
edition of 1784."
My bad.
Interesting. My guess was wrong. I thought he might have slipped
Italian words in here and there (as Pepys did, I think) and that it
just meant the sweat appeared rapidly.
--
athel
CDB
2018-07-28 21:32:09 UTC
Reply
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[buns]
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Tony Cooper
The simple search method uncovers interesting facts, too. For
example, the Chelsea bun was a feature of the Chelsea Bun House on
Jew's Row in the 18th century. Jonathan Swift wrote about a visit to
"A fine day, but begins to grow a little warm; and that makes your
little fat Presto sweat in the forehead. Pray, are not the fine buns
sold here in our town; was it not Rrrrrrrrrare Chelsea buns? I bought
one to-day in my walk; it cost me a penny; it was stale, and I did not
like it, as the man said, &c."
That did stump me, though. "Presto sweat"? Google is of no help.
Oh, yes it is. "Jonathan Swift Presto" worked like a charm.
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Tony Cooper
For a food product to be named for the place where it was either
famous or first made is not unusual. The "Parker House roll" is an
American example as is a "Waldorf salad".
Given that it is capitalised, might one suggests that Presto is simply
a nickname for himself?
Apparently for a certain aspect of his nature:

"an inveterate joker, affectionately known to his closest female
companions as “Presto”"

"Presto, the spirit of play in Swift’s nature"

"In the trinity of his nature, along with Father Swift and Presto, the
joking Son,"

https://www.newstatesman.com/culture/books/2016/11/irrational-rationality-jonathan-swift
Tony Cooper
2018-07-28 21:41:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by CDB
[buns]
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Tony Cooper
The simple search method uncovers interesting facts, too. For
example, the Chelsea bun was a feature of the Chelsea Bun House on
Jew's Row in the 18th century. Jonathan Swift wrote about a visit to
"A fine day, but begins to grow a little warm; and that makes your
little fat Presto sweat in the forehead. Pray, are not the fine buns
sold here in our town; was it not Rrrrrrrrrare Chelsea buns? I bought
one to-day in my walk; it cost me a penny; it was stale, and I did not
like it, as the man said, &c."
That did stump me, though. "Presto sweat"? Google is of no help.
Oh, yes it is. "Jonathan Swift Presto" worked like a charm.
Yes, but I wasn't smart enough to go for the full phrase. I Googled
"Presto sweat". "Sweat" wasn't key to the explanation.
Post by CDB
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Tony Cooper
For a food product to be named for the place where it was either
famous or first made is not unusual. The "Parker House roll" is an
American example as is a "Waldorf salad".
Given that it is capitalised, might one suggests that Presto is simply
a nickname for himself?
"an inveterate joker, affectionately known to his closest female
companions as “Presto”"
"Presto, the spirit of play in Swift’s nature"
"In the trinity of his nature, along with Father Swift and Presto, the
joking Son,"
https://www.newstatesman.com/culture/books/2016/11/irrational-rationality-jonathan-swift
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Janet
2018-07-28 16:41:21 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
In article <***@4ax.com>, tonycooper214
@invalid.com says...
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.)
Male buttock
Most of them did
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Chelsea buns" (not defined),
Buttocks of upmarket male
Post by Peter T. Daniels
though one of them did "lardy buns"
Obese buttocks
You need a DVR recorder so that you can record TV broadcasts and
replay them whenever and as often as you like, dictionary in hand.
Or a keyboard that can be used to search for information. Typing in
"Chelsea buns" provides photographs, recipes, and why it is called a
"Chelsea bun". The same technique works for "lardy buns" and results
in photographs, recipes, and other names for the lardy bun.
It's interesting to discuss otherpondian food products, but to remain
ignorant when the explanatory information is so accessible is
inexcusable.
The simple search method uncovers interesting facts, too. For
example, the Chelsea bun was a feature of the Chelsea Bun House on
Jew's Row in the 18th century. Jonathan Swift wrote about a visit to
"A fine day, but begins to grow a little warm; and that makes your
little fat Presto sweat in the forehead. Pray, are not the fine buns
sold here in our town; was it not Rrrrrrrrrare Chelsea buns? I bought
one to-day in my walk; it cost me a penny; it was stale, and I did not
like it, as the man said, &c."
That did stump me, though. "Presto sweat"? Google is of no help.
" your little fat Presto" = Swift himself. That is an alteration of
his original script by a later publisher. You can read about it here

http://www.online-literature.com/swift/journal-to-stella/0/

Janet
Jerry Friedman
2018-07-28 19:06:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Janet
@invalid.com says...
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.)
Male buttock
Most of them did
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Chelsea buns" (not defined),
Buttocks of upmarket male
Post by Peter T. Daniels
though one of them did "lardy buns"
Obese buttocks
You need a DVR recorder so that you can record TV broadcasts and
replay them whenever and as often as you like, dictionary in hand.
Or a keyboard that can be used to search for information. Typing in
"Chelsea buns" provides photographs, recipes, and why it is called a
"Chelsea bun". The same technique works for "lardy buns" and results
in photographs, recipes, and other names for the lardy bun.
It's interesting to discuss otherpondian food products, but to remain
ignorant when the explanatory information is so accessible is
inexcusable.
The simple search method uncovers interesting facts, too. For
example, the Chelsea bun was a feature of the Chelsea Bun House on
Jew's Row in the 18th century. Jonathan Swift wrote about a visit to
"A fine day, but begins to grow a little warm; and that makes your
little fat Presto sweat in the forehead. Pray, are not the fine buns
sold here in our town; was it not Rrrrrrrrrare Chelsea buns? I bought
one to-day in my walk; it cost me a penny; it was stale, and I did not
like it, as the man said, &c."
That did stump me, though. "Presto sweat"? Google is of no help.
" your little fat Presto" = Swift himself. That is an alteration of
his original script by a later publisher. You can read about it here
http://www.online-literature.com/swift/journal-to-stella/0/
And here in a footnote by that later publisher.

https://books.google.com/books?id=8GDRAAAAMAAJ&pg=PA8
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-28 17:13:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.)
Male buttock
Most of them did
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Chelsea buns" (not defined),
Buttocks of upmarket male
Post by Peter T. Daniels
though one of them did "lardy buns"
Obese buttocks
You need a DVR recorder so that you can record TV broadcasts and
replay them whenever and as often as you like, dictionary in hand.
Or a keyboard that can be used to search for information. Typing in
"Chelsea buns" provides photographs, recipes, and why it is called a
"Chelsea bun". The same technique works for "lardy buns" and results
in photographs, recipes, and other names for the lardy bun.
Even you should be able to see that nothing you list constitutes a
_definition_. I _saw_ examples of them _being made_, but half a dozen
instances do _not_ comprise an adequate data set for using the word.

Which, incidentally, is the same (correct!) argument you are making about
"capsize" in arguing with Tak To.
Post by Tony Cooper
It's interesting to discuss otherpondian food products, but to remain
ignorant when the explanatory information is so accessible is
inexcusable.
The simple search method uncovers interesting facts, too. For
example, the Chelsea bun was a feature of the Chelsea Bun House on
Jew's Row in the 18th century. Jonathan Swift wrote about a visit to
Only someone addicted to British costume dramas would find that "fascinating."
Post by Tony Cooper
"A fine day, but begins to grow a little warm; and that makes your
little fat Presto sweat in the forehead. Pray, are not the fine buns
sold here in our town; was it not Rrrrrrrrrare Chelsea buns? I bought
one to-day in my walk; it cost me a penny; it was stale, and I did not
like it, as the man said, &c."
That did stump me, though. "Presto sweat"? Google is of no help.
For a food product to be named for the place where it was either
famous or first made is not unusual. The "Parker House roll" is an
American example as is a "Waldorf salad".
And the Danish pastry, and the Jerusalem artichoke. Now pull the other one.
Tony Cooper
2018-07-28 18:18:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 10:13:49 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.)
Male buttock
Most of them did
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Chelsea buns" (not defined),
Buttocks of upmarket male
Post by Peter T. Daniels
though one of them did "lardy buns"
Obese buttocks
You need a DVR recorder so that you can record TV broadcasts and
replay them whenever and as often as you like, dictionary in hand.
Or a keyboard that can be used to search for information. Typing in
"Chelsea buns" provides photographs, recipes, and why it is called a
"Chelsea bun". The same technique works for "lardy buns" and results
in photographs, recipes, and other names for the lardy bun.
Even you should be able to see that nothing you list constitutes a
_definition_. I _saw_ examples of them _being made_, but half a dozen
instances do _not_ comprise an adequate data set for using the word.
A recipe for a Chelsea bun that tells you exactly what's in it and how
to prepare it doesn't define it? A photograph of a Chelsea bun that
shows what the finished product looks like doesn't complete that
definition? The information about why it is called a "Chelsea bun"
doesn't add more to the definition?

What, exactly, do you need of a definition?

The difference between us is that when I make a mistake due to a
failure to properly research something, I admit to the failure as I
did with the word "Presto". You continue to dig the hole deeper.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-28 18:46:24 UTC
Reply
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 10:13:49 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.)
Male buttock
Most of them did
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Chelsea buns" (not defined),
Buttocks of upmarket male
Post by Peter T. Daniels
though one of them did "lardy buns"
Obese buttocks
You need a DVR recorder so that you can record TV broadcasts and
replay them whenever and as often as you like, dictionary in hand.
Or a keyboard that can be used to search for information. Typing in
"Chelsea buns" provides photographs, recipes, and why it is called a
"Chelsea bun". The same technique works for "lardy buns" and results
in photographs, recipes, and other names for the lardy bun.
Even you should be able to see that nothing you list constitutes a
_definition_. I _saw_ examples of them _being made_, but half a dozen
instances do _not_ comprise an adequate data set for using the word.
A recipe for a Chelsea bun that tells you exactly what's in it and how
to prepare it doesn't define it? A photograph of a Chelsea bun that
shows what the finished product looks like doesn't complete that
definition? The information about why it is called a "Chelsea bun"
doesn't add more to the definition?
In order: of course not; of course not; of course not; of course not.

Each of the first three is a single example, with no hint of what makes
it a Chelsea bun as opposed to any other kind of bun; and the source of
its name says nothing about its essential characteristics.
Post by Tony Cooper
What, exactly, do you need of a definition?
Have you ever looked in a dictionary?
Post by Tony Cooper
The difference between us is that when I make a mistake due to a
failure to properly research something, I admit to the failure as I
did with the word "Presto". You continue to dig the hole deeper.
"Mistake"? I stated, correctly, that no definition of "Chelsea bun" was
offered.

You don't know any better than anyone else what distinguishes a Chelsea
bun from any other kind of bun, such as a Soho bun, a Kensington bun, a
Kew bun, a Piccadilly bun, etc. etc. etc.
Tony Cooper
2018-07-28 19:16:03 UTC
Reply
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On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 11:46:24 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 10:13:49 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.)
Male buttock
Most of them did
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Chelsea buns" (not defined),
Buttocks of upmarket male
Post by Peter T. Daniels
though one of them did "lardy buns"
Obese buttocks
You need a DVR recorder so that you can record TV broadcasts and
replay them whenever and as often as you like, dictionary in hand.
Or a keyboard that can be used to search for information. Typing in
"Chelsea buns" provides photographs, recipes, and why it is called a
"Chelsea bun". The same technique works for "lardy buns" and results
in photographs, recipes, and other names for the lardy bun.
Even you should be able to see that nothing you list constitutes a
_definition_. I _saw_ examples of them _being made_, but half a dozen
instances do _not_ comprise an adequate data set for using the word.
A recipe for a Chelsea bun that tells you exactly what's in it and how
to prepare it doesn't define it? A photograph of a Chelsea bun that
shows what the finished product looks like doesn't complete that
definition? The information about why it is called a "Chelsea bun"
doesn't add more to the definition?
In order: of course not; of course not; of course not; of course not.
Each of the first three is a single example, with no hint of what makes
it a Chelsea bun as opposed to any other kind of bun; and the source of
its name says nothing about its essential characteristics.
Interesting, but invalid defense.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
What, exactly, do you need of a definition?
Have you ever looked in a dictionary?
Post by Tony Cooper
The difference between us is that when I make a mistake due to a
failure to properly research something, I admit to the failure as I
did with the word "Presto". You continue to dig the hole deeper.
"Mistake"? I stated, correctly, that no definition of "Chelsea bun" was
offered.
You don't know any better than anyone else what distinguishes a Chelsea
bun from any other kind of bun, such as a Soho bun, a Kensington bun, a
Kew bun, a Piccadilly bun, etc. etc. etc.
The shovel remains in use and the hole is deeper.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
charles
2018-07-28 20:03:16 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 10:13:49 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.)
Male buttock
Most of them did
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Chelsea buns" (not defined),
Buttocks of upmarket male
Post by Peter T. Daniels
though one of them did "lardy buns"
Obese buttocks
You need a DVR recorder so that you can record TV broadcasts and
replay them whenever and as often as you like, dictionary in hand.
Or a keyboard that can be used to search for information. Typing in
"Chelsea buns" provides photographs, recipes, and why it is called a
"Chelsea bun". The same technique works for "lardy buns" and results
in photographs, recipes, and other names for the lardy bun.
Even you should be able to see that nothing you list constitutes a
_definition_. I _saw_ examples of them _being made_, but half a dozen
instances do _not_ comprise an adequate data set for using the word.
A recipe for a Chelsea bun that tells you exactly what's in it and how
to prepare it doesn't define it? A photograph of a Chelsea bun that
shows what the finished product looks like doesn't complete that
definition? The information about why it is called a "Chelsea bun"
doesn't add more to the definition?
In order: of course not; of course not; of course not; of course not.
Each of the first three is a single example, with no hint of what makes
it a Chelsea bun as opposed to any other kind of bun; and the source of
its name says nothing about its essential characteristics.
Post by Tony Cooper
What, exactly, do you need of a definition?
Have you ever looked in a dictionary?
Post by Tony Cooper
The difference between us is that when I make a mistake due to a
failure to properly research something, I admit to the failure as I
did with the word "Presto". You continue to dig the hole deeper.
"Mistake"? I stated, correctly, that no definition of "Chelsea bun" was
offered.
You don't know any better than anyone else what distinguishes a Chelsea
bun from any other kind of bun, such as a Soho bun, a Kensington bun, a
Kew bun, a Piccadilly bun, etc. etc. etc.
as smeone who lives quite close to London, I've never heard of these buns.
There is however a "Bath Bun", about which I'm sure you will contest its
existance. You are, by pure chance, nearly riight about Kew buns. They are
called "Maids of Honour tarts (or cakes)" made by a bakery in Kew.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Tony Cooper
2018-07-28 20:23:31 UTC
Reply
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Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 10:13:49 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.)
Male buttock
Most of them did
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Chelsea buns" (not defined),
Buttocks of upmarket male
Post by Peter T. Daniels
though one of them did "lardy buns"
Obese buttocks
You need a DVR recorder so that you can record TV broadcasts and
replay them whenever and as often as you like, dictionary in hand.
Or a keyboard that can be used to search for information. Typing in
"Chelsea buns" provides photographs, recipes, and why it is called a
"Chelsea bun". The same technique works for "lardy buns" and results
in photographs, recipes, and other names for the lardy bun.
Even you should be able to see that nothing you list constitutes a
_definition_. I _saw_ examples of them _being made_, but half a dozen
instances do _not_ comprise an adequate data set for using the word.
A recipe for a Chelsea bun that tells you exactly what's in it and how
to prepare it doesn't define it? A photograph of a Chelsea bun that
shows what the finished product looks like doesn't complete that
definition? The information about why it is called a "Chelsea bun"
doesn't add more to the definition?
In order: of course not; of course not; of course not; of course not.
Each of the first three is a single example, with no hint of what makes
it a Chelsea bun as opposed to any other kind of bun; and the source of
its name says nothing about its essential characteristics.
Post by Tony Cooper
What, exactly, do you need of a definition?
Have you ever looked in a dictionary?
Post by Tony Cooper
The difference between us is that when I make a mistake due to a
failure to properly research something, I admit to the failure as I
did with the word "Presto". You continue to dig the hole deeper.
"Mistake"? I stated, correctly, that no definition of "Chelsea bun" was
offered.
You don't know any better than anyone else what distinguishes a Chelsea
bun from any other kind of bun, such as a Soho bun, a Kensington bun, a
Kew bun, a Piccadilly bun, etc. etc. etc.
as smeone who lives quite close to London, I've never heard of these buns.
He's made up those names as buns named by areas. It's his version of
being clever. It's only by accident if he hit on a real bun. (Double
entendre not intended)
Post by charles
There is however a "Bath Bun", about which I'm sure you will contest its
existance. You are, by pure chance, nearly riight about Kew buns. They are
called "Maids of Honour tarts (or cakes)" made by a bakery in Kew.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Ken Blake
2018-07-28 17:26:30 UTC
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On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 12:13:08 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
For a food product to be named for the place where it was either
famous or first made is not unusual. The "Parker House roll" is an
American example as is a "Waldorf salad".
Perhaps the most common such term these days is "Buffalo wings."
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-28 17:38:36 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 12:13:08 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
For a food product to be named for the place where it was either
famous or first made is not unusual. The "Parker House roll" is an
American example as is a "Waldorf salad".
Perhaps the most common such term these days is "Buffalo wings."
As opposed to "Buffalo Chips".

Joke:

The Indian chief calls the tribe together in September.

"I have some good new and bad news for you."

"First the bad news: Because you were lazy this year and did not tend
to the crops, you will have to eat buffalo chips over the winter."

"Now the good news: We have a huge supply of buffalo chips."
LFS
2018-07-28 19:29:55 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
For a food product to be named for the place where it was either
famous or first made is not unusual. The "Parker House roll" is an
American example as is a "Waldorf salad".
I was ridiculously pleased to be served a Waldorf salad at a dinner at
the Waldorf in London.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Tony Cooper
2018-07-28 19:41:06 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Tony Cooper
For a food product to be named for the place where it was either
famous or first made is not unusual. The "Parker House roll" is an
American example as is a "Waldorf salad".
I was ridiculously pleased to be served a Waldorf salad at a dinner at
the Waldorf in London.
My wife occasionally makes a Waldorf salad, but the name automatically
makes me think of "Fawlty Towers". My wife is tired of me saying "I
thought we were out of Waldorfs".

I can't imagine anyone in this group not knowing the reference, but
just in case:



BTW, my wife uses raisins, not grapes, in hers.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-28 20:44:56 UTC
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On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 12:13:08 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
For a food product to be named for the place where it was either
famous or first made is not unusual. The "Parker House roll" is an
American example as is a "Waldorf salad".
At a Christmas party for the teachers in our unit in Harlem, I asked
the bartender for a "Manhattan".

He didn't know what the hell I was talking about.
Ken Blake
2018-07-28 22:28:47 UTC
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On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 13:44:56 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 12:13:08 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
For a food product to be named for the place where it was either
famous or first made is not unusual. The "Parker House roll" is an
American example as is a "Waldorf salad".
At a Christmas party for the teachers in our unit in Harlem, I asked
the bartender for a "Manhattan".
He didn't know what the hell I was talking about.
A very inexperienced bartender.
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-28 16:35:57 UTC
Reply
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Raw Message
Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.)
Male buttock
Most of them did
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Chelsea buns" (not defined),
Buttocks of upmarket male
Post by Peter T. Daniels
though one of them did "lardy buns"
Obese buttocks
You need a DVR recorder so that you can record TV broadcasts and
replay them whenever and as often as you like, dictionary in hand.
I have just created new recipe:

"Chubby Cheeks":

Two eggs served over a bed of pork snouts.

https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS1zw5P8EHgJ_sKINGzIRO-6Z0xxcGkQaRwj4mH8IdW7fmKuJE11w
Janet
2018-07-28 17:06:01 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Two eggs served over a bed of pork snouts.
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS1zw5P8EHgJ_sKINGzIRO-6Z0xxcGkQaRwj4mH8IdW7fmKuJE11w
Next, "baps".

"Chubby cheeks with baps"

https://tinyurl.com/yapmgevt

Janet.
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-28 18:02:44 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
Two eggs served over a bed of pork snouts.
https://encrypted-tbn0.gstatic.com/images?q=tbn:ANd9GcS1zw5P8EHgJ_sKINGzIRO-6Z0xxcGkQaRwj4mH8IdW7fmKuJE11w
Next, "baps".
"Chubby cheeks with baps"
https://tinyurl.com/yapmgevt
Looks more like, "Cheekus Interruptus".
Tony Cooper
2018-07-28 18:40:41 UTC
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Post by Janet
Next, "baps".
This is a word that appears frequently in some of the novels that I
read. I've never really understood what a "bap" is. One source says
"A bap is, at its simplest, a bread roll. At its more complicated, it
is tender pillow of dough, often made with milk, lard, and butter. A
more humble, Scottish version of the brioche. The bap is the ideal
bread for a simple meat sandwich."

But, the appearances of the word seem to mean that a bap is a
something more...a sandwich or something that, in itself, is a light
meal. Not just bread, but bread with something in it.

Context of how I've seen it used would be helpful, but I don't have
any at hand. I may be misremembering, but it seems that peckish
people stop at what we would call a "food truck" and order a bap for
lunch. It doesn't seem to me that they would have just a bread roll
for lunch.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-28 18:48:26 UTC
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[did she? then where did the extra chevron come from?]
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Next, "baps".
This is a word that appears frequently in some of the novels that I
read. I've never really understood what a "bap" is. One source says
"A bap is, at its simplest, a bread roll. At its more complicated, it
is tender pillow of dough, often made with milk, lard, and butter. A
more humble, Scottish version of the brioche. The bap is the ideal
bread for a simple meat sandwich."
But, the appearances of the word seem to mean that a bap is a
something more...a sandwich or something that, in itself, is a light
meal. Not just bread, but bread with something in it.
Context of how I've seen it used would be helpful, but I don't have
any at hand. I may be misremembering, but it seems that peckish
people stop at what we would call a "food truck" and order a bap for
lunch. It doesn't seem to me that they would have just a bread roll
for lunch.
Howzat? Your (self-)vaunted research skills have failed to produce a
satisfactory answer? How can that be?
Janet
2018-07-28 18:55:24 UTC
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In article <***@4ax.com>, tonycooper214
@invalid.com says...
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Next, "baps".
This is a word that appears frequently in some of the novels that I
read. I've never really understood what a "bap" is. One source says
"A bap is, at its simplest, a bread roll. At its more complicated, it
is tender pillow of dough, often made with milk, lard, and butter. A
more humble, Scottish version of the brioche. The bap is the ideal
bread for a simple meat sandwich."
But, the appearances of the word seem to mean that a bap is a
something more...a sandwich or something that, in itself, is a light
meal. Not just bread, but bread with something in it.
Not just baking.

In Br E, baps and buns also refer to body parts.

Janet
charles
2018-07-28 20:06:47 UTC
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Post by Janet
@invalid.com says...
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Next, "baps".
This is a word that appears frequently in some of the novels that I
read. I've never really understood what a "bap" is. One source says
"A bap is, at its simplest, a bread roll. At its more complicated, it
is tender pillow of dough, often made with milk, lard, and butter. A
more humble, Scottish version of the brioche. The bap is the ideal
bread for a simple meat sandwich."
But, the appearances of the word seem to mean that a bap is a
something more...a sandwich or something that, in itself, is a light
meal. Not just bread, but bread with something in it.
Not just baking.
In Br E, baps and buns also refer to body parts.
so do "muffins"
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Katy Jennison
2018-07-28 21:18:48 UTC
Reply
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Next, "baps".
This is a word that appears frequently in some of the novels that I
read. I've never really understood what a "bap" is. One source says
"A bap is, at its simplest, a bread roll. At its more complicated, it
is tender pillow of dough, often made with milk, lard, and butter. A
more humble, Scottish version of the brioche. The bap is the ideal
bread for a simple meat sandwich."
But, the appearances of the word seem to mean that a bap is a
something more...a sandwich or something that, in itself, is a light
meal. Not just bread, but bread with something in it.
Context of how I've seen it used would be helpful, but I don't have
any at hand. I may be misremembering, but it seems that peckish
people stop at what we would call a "food truck" and order a bap for
lunch. It doesn't seem to me that they would have just a bread roll
for lunch.
It's a medium-sized flattish bread roll, usually floury on the top, and
if you had one for lunch you would indeed have something in it. Ham and
salad; egg mayonnaise; pulled pork; whatever.
--
Katy Jennison
Tony Cooper
2018-07-28 21:38:16 UTC
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On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 22:18:48 +0100, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Next, "baps".
This is a word that appears frequently in some of the novels that I
read. I've never really understood what a "bap" is. One source says
"A bap is, at its simplest, a bread roll. At its more complicated, it
is tender pillow of dough, often made with milk, lard, and butter. A
more humble, Scottish version of the brioche. The bap is the ideal
bread for a simple meat sandwich."
But, the appearances of the word seem to mean that a bap is a
something more...a sandwich or something that, in itself, is a light
meal. Not just bread, but bread with something in it.
Context of how I've seen it used would be helpful, but I don't have
any at hand. I may be misremembering, but it seems that peckish
people stop at what we would call a "food truck" and order a bap for
lunch. It doesn't seem to me that they would have just a bread roll
for lunch.
It's a medium-sized flattish bread roll, usually floury on the top, and
if you had one for lunch you would indeed have something in it. Ham and
salad; egg mayonnaise; pulled pork; whatever.
Makes sense. I think that confuses me is that the reference is to
"having a bap for lunch". In the above, I would say "having a
(describe the filling) for lunch". I might add "in a (describe the
bread)", but I wouldn't use the bread name as the description.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-28 22:59:59 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 28 Jul 2018 22:18:48 +0100, Katy Jennison
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Next, "baps".
This is a word that appears frequently in some of the novels that I
read. I've never really understood what a "bap" is. One source says
"A bap is, at its simplest, a bread roll. At its more complicated, it
is tender pillow of dough, often made with milk, lard, and butter. A
more humble, Scottish version of the brioche. The bap is the ideal
bread for a simple meat sandwich."
But, the appearances of the word seem to mean that a bap is a
something more...a sandwich or something that, in itself, is a light
meal. Not just bread, but bread with something in it.
Context of how I've seen it used would be helpful, but I don't have
any at hand. I may be misremembering, but it seems that peckish
people stop at what we would call a "food truck" and order a bap for
lunch. It doesn't seem to me that they would have just a bread roll
for lunch.
It's a medium-sized flattish bread roll, usually floury on the top, and
if you had one for lunch you would indeed have something in it. Ham and
salad; egg mayonnaise; pulled pork; whatever.
Makes sense. I think that confuses me is that the reference is to
"having a bap for lunch". In the above, I would say "having a
(describe the filling) for lunch". I might add "in a (describe the
bread)", but I wouldn't use the bread name as the description.
There are people in this world who eat bread as it comes, you know.
And some who apply nothing but a slather of butter. Alternatively
you might say 'having a bap' when you haven't quite made your
mind up as the what filling you're going to have or simply to force
the curious and American into asking 'what you gonna put in it?'
When asked "What you got for lunch?" you'll often hear people
reply with 'sandwiches' or 'a roll'. It is left as an exercise for the
reader to determine whether this is because we value our privacy
when it comes to fillings, are simply vague about food generally, or
get somebody else to make our 'packed' lunches and therefore
genuinely have no idea what's between the bread until we open
whatever they are wrapped/contained in!

Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-28 17:09:43 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Peter T. Daniels
This evening's Great British Baking Show featured by far the largest
collection of unfamiliar terminology of any of the episodes I've seen.
The "signature bake" was "buns." (Bun was not defined.)
Male buttock
If only.
Post by Janet
Most of them did
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"Chelsea buns" (not defined),
Buttocks of upmarket male
Post by Peter T. Daniels
though one of them did "lardy buns"
Obese buttocks
You need a DVR recorder so that you can record TV broadcasts and
replay them whenever and as often as you like, dictionary in hand.
I have enquired (AmE inquired) about a DVR that would work off a broadcast
signal, and the only thing that could be suggested was the "converter box"
that for some reason is still being sold, which plucked the new digital
signal from the air and converted it so as to be playable on old analog
TVs. Some of them, though not the one I got with my Free Coupon from the
Gummint, have a USB port for an external storage device. But they don't
seem to include timers or programming.
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