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a ceremony for him to...
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a***@gmail.com
2017-05-18 07:01:34 UTC
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1) We attended a ceremony for him to receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
2) We examined a technique for people to memorize things faster.

Are these sentences grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?

I think they both work, but the 'for... to' part doesn't function exactly
in the same way. In '2' the technique is used by people to memorize things
faster. In '1' the ceremony is not used by him to receive a star.

But one could say that the purpose of the ceremony is for him to have a star,
and the purpose of the technique is for people to memorize things faster.

Is that the way to look at it?

Gratefully,
Navi.
Harrison Hill
2017-05-18 07:27:51 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We attended a ceremony for him to receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
2) We examined a technique for people to memorize things faster.
Are these sentences grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
I think they both work, but the 'for... to' part doesn't function exactly
in the same way. In '2' the technique is used by people to memorize things
faster. In '1' the ceremony is not used by him to receive a star.
But one could say that the purpose of the ceremony is for him to have a star,
and the purpose of the technique is for people to memorize things faster.
Is that the way to look at it?
Gratefully,
Navi.
(1) is clumsy but is the sort of thing people say. Elliptical
for perhaps:

We attended a ceremony [which had been organised] for him to
receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.

Poor use of "for...to" but not unnatural. (2) is fine.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-05-18 11:43:04 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) We attended a ceremony for him to receive a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame.
2) We examined a technique for people to memorize things faster.
Are these sentences grammatical?
Are they idiomatic?
No.

And you know that.
Post by a***@gmail.com
I think they both work, but the 'for... to' part doesn't function exactly
in the same way. In '2' the technique is used by people to memorize things
faster. In '1' the ceremony is not used by him to receive a star.
But one could say that the purpose of the ceremony is for him to have a star,
and the purpose of the technique is for people to memorize things faster.
Is that the way to look at it?
No.

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