Discussion:
Gone- Went
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Mack A. Damia
2017-10-10 22:09:12 UTC
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On an ID "Unusual Suspects" episode:

The detective -

"She had went to Missy's parents to console them...."

Shouldn't it be "She had gone to...."?

I know "She went to Missy's parents...." is okay, but "She had went
to..." just doesn't sound right.

What is the rule, if there is one?
Richard Tobin
2017-10-10 22:34:46 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
The detective -
"She had went to Missy's parents to console them...."
Shouldn't it be "She had gone to...."?
"Had went" is not standard English, but I've read that it is
becoming more common.
Post by Mack A. Damia
I know "She went to Missy's parents...." is okay, but "She had went
to..." just doesn't sound right.
What is the rule, if there is one?
If you want to express it as a rule:

The perfect is formed from "have" and the past participle, the
pluperfect from the past tense of "have", i.e. "had", and the past
participle.

In many cases - the most regular verbs - the past tense is the same as
the past participle, so it's "I walked" and "I had walked". But the
past participle of the very irregular verb "go" is "gone", not "went",
so it's "I had gone". Similarly for more mildly irregular verbs like
"take": it's "I had taken", not "I had took".

-- Richard
musika
2017-10-10 23:12:13 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Mack A. Damia
The detective -
"She had went to Missy's parents to console them...."
Shouldn't it be "She had gone to...."?
"Had went" is not standard English, but I've read that it is
becoming more common.
It's standard Geordie and Skitt was always going on about it in the USA.
--
Ray
UK
Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2017-10-11 00:35:03 UTC
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Post by musika
It's standard Geordie and Skitt was always going on
about it in the USA.
Comma obligatory after "Geordie."
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
musika
2017-10-11 01:07:46 UTC
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Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by musika
It's standard Geordie and Skitt was always going on
about it in the USA.
Comma obligatory after "Geordie."
Perhaps I was channelling Janet,.
--
Ray
UK
Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2017-10-11 03:49:42 UTC
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Post by musika
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by musika
It's standard Geordie and Skitt was always going on
about it in the USA.
Comma obligatory after "Geordie."
Perhaps I was channelling Janet,.
That's what I, thought ... but she does, the reverse.
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
Peter Moylan
2017-10-11 03:56:10 UTC
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Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by musika
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by musika
It's standard Geordie and Skitt was always going on
about it in the USA.
Comma obligatory after "Geordie."
Perhaps I was channelling Janet,.
That's what I, thought ... but she does, the reverse.
The comma between subject and verb was, already present, but it, had
floated upwards and become an apostrophe.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
occam
2017-10-11 08:13:06 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by musika
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by musika
It's standard Geordie and Skitt was always going on
about it in the USA.
Comma obligatory after "Geordie."
Perhaps I was channelling Janet,.
That's what I, thought ... but she does, the reverse.
The comma between subject and verb was, already present, but it, had
floated upwards and become an apostrophe.
Ha! I'm sure you are aware of the Swiss practice of writing long numbers
using that same technique. Whereas I'd write 1,334,206.85, the Swiss
convention demands it to be written 1'334'206.85. I find this elevation
less confusing than the Continental convention which demands it to be
written as 1.334.206,85.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-10-11 06:18:45 UTC
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Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by musika
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by musika
It's standard Geordie and Skitt was always going on
about it in the USA.
Comma obligatory after "Geordie."
Perhaps I was channelling Janet,.
That's what I, thought ... but she does, the reverse.
Glad to see that you're on form, Rey. Today we saw Santa Rosa on the
news. What a mess!

Meanwhile, something that may amuse you. This morning I went to have a
blood test. One is not supposed to look at other patient's papers, but
sometimes one can hardly avoid it. At the top of the pile was a letter
from a doctor called Maxime de Cock.
--
athel
Janet
2017-10-11 09:37:12 UTC
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In article <C9eDB.22992$***@fx28.am4>, ***@NOSPAMexcite.com
says...
Post by musika
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by musika
It's standard Geordie and Skitt was always going on
about it in the USA.
Comma obligatory after "Geordie."
Perhaps I was channelling Janet,.
Hooray hooray hooray.

Janet
Stefan Ram
2017-10-10 23:01:03 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
"She had went to Missy's parents to console them...."
Shouldn't it be "She had gone to...."?
Hits in my corpus are rare, but there are some:

"as soon as he had went away from his mother's house"

"Sense and Sensibility" - Jane Austen

"the very next mornin' after I had went down stairs"

"Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" - Mark Twain

"every spare penny he had went on books"

"The Garden-Party" - Katherine Mansfield

"The meanewhyle Morgan le Fay had wente kynge
Arthure had bene dede."

"But sir Dynadan had wente the Haute Prynce
had bene more weryar than he was"

"Le Morte d'Arthur" - Sir Thomas Malory (1485)

In the last case, I'm not sure if »had wente" is
out modern "had went".
Stefan Ram
2017-10-10 23:03:52 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
"every spare penny he had went on books"
"The Garden-Party" - Katherine Mansfield
PS: here the "had" is not used to form a
composite verb form of "to go". So, this
should be removed from my list.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-10-11 06:20:32 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Stefan Ram
"every spare penny he had went on books"
"The Garden-Party" - Katherine Mansfield
PS: here the "had" is not used to form a
composite verb form of "to go". So, this
should be removed from my list.
Ha. I already did.
--
athel
Kerr-Mudd,John
2017-10-11 09:30:43 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Stefan Ram
"every spare penny he had went on books"
"The Garden-Party" - Katherine Mansfield
PS: here the "had" is not used to form a
composite verb form of "to go". So, this
should be removed from my list.
Ha. I already did.
It had to went. I mean it had to go.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-10-11 06:20:13 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Mack A. Damia
"She had went to Missy's parents to console them...."
Shouldn't it be "She had gone to...."?
"as soon as he had went away from his mother's house"
"Sense and Sensibility" - Jane Austen
"the very next mornin' after I had went down stairs"
"Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" - Mark Twain
"every spare penny he had went on books"
That's not an example: "had" is not an auxiliary there.
Post by Stefan Ram
"The Garden-Party" - Katherine Mansfield
"The meanewhyle Morgan le Fay had wente kynge
Arthure had bene dede."
"But sir Dynadan had wente the Haute Prynce
had bene more weryar than he was"
"Le Morte d'Arthur" - Sir Thomas Malory (1485)
In the last case, I'm not sure if »had wente" is
out modern "had went".
--
athel
Ross
2017-10-11 06:45:27 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Mack A. Damia
"She had went to Missy's parents to console them...."
Shouldn't it be "She had gone to...."?
"as soon as he had went away from his mother's house"
"Sense and Sensibility" - Jane Austen
"the very next mornin' after I had went down stairs"
"Adventures of Huckleberry Finn" - Mark Twain
"every spare penny he had went on books"
That's not an example: "had" is not an auxiliary there.
Post by Stefan Ram
"The Garden-Party" - Katherine Mansfield
"The meanewhyle Morgan le Fay had wente kynge
Arthure had bene dede."
"But sir Dynadan had wente the Haute Prynce
had bene more weryar than he was"
"Le Morte d'Arthur" - Sir Thomas Malory (1485)
In the last case, I'm not sure if »had wente" is
out modern "had went".
Neither of these makes sense with "wente" as past of "go". It
is clearly the past of "wenan" (> "ween") meaning think or believe.
Janet
2017-10-10 23:32:51 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
The detective -
"She had went to Missy's parents to console them...."
Shouldn't it be "She had gone to...."?
Yes, unless the detective is a native Glaswegian.

Janet
Jerry Friedman
2017-10-11 01:44:18 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Mack A. Damia
The detective -
"She had went to Missy's parents to console them...."
Shouldn't it be "She had gone to...."?
Yes, unless the detective is a native Glaswegian.
Or non-standard-speaking American, at least in lots of places.

As a punctuatrice, you may be familiar with its occurrence in the
song "I Love You Period".


--
Jerry Friedman
Pierre Jelenc
2017-10-11 16:13:37 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
The detective -
"She had went to Missy's parents to console them...."
Shouldn't it be "She had gone to...."?
We don't know whether the speaker is using the pluperfect of "she goes
to..." or "she wends to..." It may well depend on the local dialect.

Pierre
--
Pierre Jelenc
The Gigometer www.gigometer.com
The NYC Beer Guide www.nycbeer.org
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