Discussion:
Is it 'promoted as' or 'promoted to' or either?
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Dingbat
2017-05-19 08:20:17 UTC
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Is it 'promoted as' or 'promoted to' or either?

Indian English invariably has 'promoted as' where Anglophones use 'promoted to'.
Indians who favor British English consider 'promoted as' to be an Indianism or
an error. Yet, I find 'promoted as' in a publication outside India:

<<Born in in Ohio in 1940, Roger Ailes graduated from Ohio University and began
his career as a property assistant for NBC News’ Cleveland affiliate. While
there, Ailes became a producer and was promoted as an executive producer of
the affiliate’s “The Mike Douglas Show.”>>
http://www.lifezette.com/polizette/end-era-roger-ailes-lion-fox-news-dead-77/
Richard Tobin
2017-05-19 09:27:26 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
Is it 'promoted as' or 'promoted to' or either?
Promoted to. Especially since "promoted as" normally means something
different: the drug was promoted as an alternative to aspirin.

-- Richard
Dingbat
2017-05-19 09:51:41 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Dingbat
Is it 'promoted as' or 'promoted to' or either?
Promoted to. Especially since "promoted as" normally means something
different: the drug was promoted as an alternative to aspirin.
-- Richard
If this error isn't peculiar to India, is it a common error among some subset
of Anglophones too?
Jerry Friedman
2017-05-19 11:43:05 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Dingbat
Is it 'promoted as' or 'promoted to' or either?
Promoted to. Especially since "promoted as" normally means something
different: the drug was promoted as an alternative to aspirin.
-- Richard
If this error isn't peculiar to India, is it a common error among some subset
of Anglophones too?
Not a subset that I know, but maybe it will spread. By conservation
of "as", it disappears from "as I said" and even "cold as fuck" (for
some speakers where I live) and increases in "considered as", "labeled
as", "designated as", "called as", etc.
--
Jerry Friedman
Strong like bull
b***@aol.com
2017-05-19 19:46:24 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Dingbat
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Dingbat
Is it 'promoted as' or 'promoted to' or either?
Promoted to. Especially since "promoted as" normally means something
different: the drug was promoted as an alternative to aspirin.
-- Richard
If this error isn't peculiar to India, is it a common error among some subset
of Anglophones too?
Not a subset that I know, but maybe it will spread. By conservation
of "as", it disappears from "as I said" and even "cold as fuck" (for
some speakers where I live) and increases in "considered as", "labeled
as", "designated as", "called as", etc.
But the difference is that, etymologically, "promoted" implies movement
forward and should therefore logically be followed by "to".
Post by Jerry Friedman
--
Jerry Friedman
Strong like bull
Harrison Hill
2017-05-19 20:07:24 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
Is it 'promoted as' or 'promoted to' or either?
Indian English invariably has 'promoted as' where Anglophones use 'promoted to'.
Indians who favor British English consider 'promoted as' to be an Indianism or
<<Born in in Ohio in 1940, Roger Ailes graduated from Ohio University and began
his career as a property assistant for NBC News’ Cleveland affiliate. While
there, Ailes became a producer and was promoted as an executive producer of
the affiliate’s “The Mike Douglas Show.”>>
http://www.lifezette.com/polizette/end-era-roger-ailes-lion-fox-news-dead-77/
Perfectly good English in my SW London BrE. The two senses
of "promoted" - "brought to the top" - are combined :)
Peter Moylan
2017-05-20 11:41:32 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Dingbat
Is it 'promoted as' or 'promoted to' or either?
Indian English invariably has 'promoted as' where Anglophones use 'promoted to'.
Indians who favor British English consider 'promoted as' to be an Indianism or
<<Born in in Ohio in 1940, Roger Ailes graduated from Ohio University and began
his career as a property assistant for NBC News’ Cleveland affiliate. While
there, Ailes became a producer and was promoted as an executive producer of
the affiliate’s “The Mike Douglas Show.”>>
http://www.lifezette.com/polizette/end-era-roger-ailes-lion-fox-news-dead-77/
Perfectly good English in my SW London BrE. The two senses
of "promoted" - "brought to the top" - are combined :)
I read the original as meaning that he was an executive producer before
he was promoted. Presumably there is a higher "executive producer" rank.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-05-21 07:26:36 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Dingbat
Is it 'promoted as' or 'promoted to' or either?
Indian English invariably has 'promoted as' where Anglophones use 'promoted to'.
Indians who favor British English consider 'promoted as' to be an Indianism or
<<Born in in Ohio in 1940, Roger Ailes graduated from Ohio University and began
his career as a property assistant for NBC News’ Cleveland affiliate. While
there, Ailes became a producer and was promoted as an executive producer of
the affiliate’s “The Mike Douglas Show.”>>
http://www.lifezette.com/polizette/end-era-roger-ailes-lion-fox-news-dead-77/
Perfectly good English in my SW London BrE. The two senses
of "promoted" - "brought to the top" - are combined :)
I read the original as meaning that he was an executive producer before
he was promoted.
I thought that was a possible reading from the beginning.

If the sentence were shorter, say "He was promoted as an executive
producer", then rearranging it would make that the only reasonable
reading, "As an executive producer, he was promoted". However, the
whole long sentence makes that reading more problematic.
Post by Peter Moylan
Presumably there is a higher "executive producer" rank.
--
athel
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