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The Queen's accent in 1947 | youtube
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Dingbat
2018-05-10 12:22:53 UTC
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The Queen's accent in 1947 | youtube

Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-05-10 13:19:34 UTC
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On Thu, 10 May 2018 05:22:53 -0700 (PDT), Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
The Queen's accent in 1947 | youtube
http://youtu.be/oed8Nj1OPMM
Seven years earlier, 13th October 1940, Princess Elizabeth, aged 14,
spoke on a radio programme, Children's Hour.

"Princess Elizabeth (now The Queen) and Princess Margaret speak to
children across the world during the Second World War."

--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
GordonD
2018-05-10 19:02:27 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Thu, 10 May 2018 05:22:53 -0700 (PDT), Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
The Queen's accent in 1947 | youtube
http://youtu.be/oed8Nj1OPMM
Seven years earlier, 13th October 1940, Princess Elizabeth, aged 14,
spoke on a radio programme, Children's Hour.
"Princess Elizabeth (now The Queen) and Princess Margaret speak to
children across the world during the Second World War."
http://youtu.be/VJI9LPFQth4
I'm surprised they let them do that. They might have been sending secret
messages to their German relatives.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
the Omrud
2018-05-11 09:53:19 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Thu, 10 May 2018 05:22:53 -0700 (PDT), Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
The Queen's accent in 1947 | youtube
http://youtu.be/oed8Nj1OPMM
Seven years earlier, 13th October 1940, Princess Elizabeth, aged 14,
spoke on a radio programme, Children's Hour.
"Princess Elizabeth (now The Queen) and Princess Margaret speak to
children across the world during the Second World War."
http://youtu.be/VJI9LPFQth4
I'm surprised they let them do that. They might have been sending secret
messages to their German relatives.
Perhaps, but one suspects that the royals' German relatives were not
sympathetic to Hitler.
--
David
Neill Massello
2018-05-11 15:17:39 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Perhaps, but one suspects that the royals' German relatives were not
sympathetic to Hitler.
It was the relative in France who was the real problem.

<https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_VIII#Second_World_War>
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-05-11 19:33:50 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
Post by GordonD
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Thu, 10 May 2018 05:22:53 -0700 (PDT), Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
The Queen's accent in 1947 | youtube
http://youtu.be/oed8Nj1OPMM
Seven years earlier, 13th October 1940, Princess Elizabeth, aged 14,
spoke on a radio programme, Children's Hour.
"Princess Elizabeth (now The Queen) and Princess Margaret speak to
children across the world during the Second World War."
http://youtu.be/VJI9LPFQth4
I'm surprised they let them do that. They might have been sending secret
messages to their German relatives.
Perhaps, but one suspects that the royals' German relatives were not
sympathetic to Hitler.
I don't know who wrote the script, but it seems that Winston Churchill
was responsible for the speech being given:
https://www.smithsonianmag.com/videos/category/history/a-young-princess-elizabeths-first-radio-bro/

In 1940, Princess Elizabeth was tasked with an important job by
prime minister Winston Churchill: to give a morale-boosting radio
speech to her weary subjects during WWII, from historic Windsor
Castle.

At that time Germany had invaded many countries in Europe and was
attacking Britain. The Battle of Britain had been going for three months
and the Blitz for one month.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
J. J. Lodder
2018-05-10 19:34:58 UTC
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The Queen's accent in 1947....
A contradiction in terms. The Queen doesn't have an accent.
She Speaks English, and English is what she speaks,

Jan
occam
2018-05-10 20:13:27 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
The Queen's accent in 1947....
A contradiction in terms. The Queen doesn't have an accent.
She Speaks English, and English is what she speaks,
If you would have heard her great-great-grandfather (Prince Albert of
Saxe-Coburg and Gotha) speak ze English, you wouldn't say that mein Herr.
Dingbat
2018-05-10 21:59:55 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by J. J. Lodder
The Queen's accent in 1947....
A contradiction in terms. The Queen doesn't have an accent.
She Speaks English, and English is what she speaks,
If you would have heard her great-great-grandfather (Prince Albert of
Saxe-Coburg and Gotha) speak ze English, you wouldn't say that mein Herr.
... or George II.

"George III was the first king of the House of Hannover not to speak with a German accent".
http://madmonarchist.blogspot.com/2009/07/monarch-profile-king-george-iii.html

P.S. George II formally learned French and was formally taught German only
from the age of four. So, which was his first language - German or French?
Reading between the lines, he must have informally learned German
before and during his learning of French.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-10 22:05:34 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
Post by occam
Post by J. J. Lodder
The Queen's accent in 1947....
A contradiction in terms. The Queen doesn't have an accent.
She Speaks English, and English is what she speaks,
If you would have heard her great-great-grandfather (Prince Albert of
Saxe-Coburg and Gotha) speak ze English, you wouldn't say that mein Herr.
... or George II.
"George III was the first king of the House of Hannover not to speak with a German accent".
http://madmonarchist.blogspot.com/2009/07/monarch-profile-king-george-iii.html
P.S. George II formally learned French and was formally taught German only
from the age of four. So, which was his first language - German or French?
Reading between the lines, he must have informally learned German
before and during his learning of French.
If he was taught French and taught German, then apparently he had no native
language at all. Unless, of course, his first language was English, in
which case the whole sentence is moot.
Paul Wolff
2018-05-10 22:30:25 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Dingbat
Post by occam
Post by J. J. Lodder
The Queen's accent in 1947....
A contradiction in terms. The Queen doesn't have an accent.
She Speaks English, and English is what she speaks,
If you would have heard her great-great-grandfather (Prince Albert of
Saxe-Coburg and Gotha) speak ze English, you wouldn't say that mein Herr.
... or George II.
"George III was the first king of the House of Hannover not to speak
with a German accent".
http://madmonarchist.blogspot.com/2009/07/monarch-profile-king-george-i
ii.html
P.S. George II formally learned French and was formally taught German only
from the age of four. So, which was his first language - German or French?
Reading between the lines, he must have informally learned German
before and during his learning of French.
If he was taught French and taught German, then apparently he had no native
language at all.
Don't dismiss "formally". I learned to speak some German from a young
age, but I wasn't formally taught it until I decided it was a good idea
to fill in some of the gaps during my last couple of years at school,
and took it as a hobby subject.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Unless, of course, his first language was English, in
which case the whole sentence is moot.
He must have learned some language from his wet-nurse. I'm assuming his
mother the Queen didn't suckle him.
--
Paul
Dingbat
2018-05-10 22:56:02 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Dingbat
Post by occam
Post by J. J. Lodder
The Queen's accent in 1947....
A contradiction in terms. The Queen doesn't have an accent.
She Speaks English, and English is what she speaks,
If you would have heard her great-great-grandfather (Prince Albert of
Saxe-Coburg and Gotha) speak ze English, you wouldn't say that mein Herr.
... or George II.
"George III was the first king of the House of Hannover not to speak with a German accent".
http://madmonarchist.blogspot.com/2009/07/monarch-profile-king-george-iii.html
P.S. George II formally learned French and was formally taught German
only from the age of four. So, which was his first language - German
or French? Reading between the lines, he must have informally learned
German before and during his learning of French.
If he was taught French and taught German, then apparently he had no
native language at all. Unless, of course, his first language was English,
in which case the whole sentence is moot.
He was raised in Hanover before it was known that he was in line for the
English throne and wasn't given British citizenship till he was 22,
so his first language couldn't have been English.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-11 03:05:22 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Dingbat
"George III was the first king of the House of Hannover not to speak with a German accent".
http://madmonarchist.blogspot.com/2009/07/monarch-profile-king-george-iii.html
P.S. George II formally learned French and was formally taught German
only from the age of four. So, which was his first language - German
or French? Reading between the lines, he must have informally learned
German before and during his learning of French.
If he was taught French and taught German, then apparently he had no
native language at all. Unless, of course, his first language was English,
in which case the whole sentence is moot.
He was raised in Hanover before it was known that he was in line for the
English throne and wasn't given British citizenship till he was 22,
so his first language couldn't have been English.
Then what did he speak before he was four years old?
Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2018-05-11 03:55:37 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Dingbat
He was raised in Hanover before it was known that he was
in line for the English throne and wasn't given British
citizenship till he was 22, so his first language couldn't
have been English.
Then what did he speak before he was four years old?
Yiddish, of course, you fuckin' obnoxious asshole.

See the autistic obnoxious asshole:
Loading Image... <------
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-11 13:02:40 UTC
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Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Dingbat
He was raised in Hanover before it was known that he was
in line for the English throne and wasn't given British
citizenship till he was 22, so his first language couldn't
have been English.
Then what did he speak before he was four years old?
Yiddish, of course,
Hilarious, antisemitic asshole moron.
Dingbat
2018-05-11 08:47:11 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Dingbat
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Dingbat
"George III was the first king of the House of Hannover not to speak with a German accent".
http://madmonarchist.blogspot.com/2009/07/monarch-profile-king-george-iii.html
P.S. George II formally learned French and was formally taught German
only from the age of four. So, which was his first language - German
or French? Reading between the lines, he must have informally learned
German before and during his learning of French.
If he was taught French and taught German, then apparently he had no
native language at all. Unless, of course, his first language was
English, in which case the whole sentence is moot.
He was raised in Hanover before it was known that he was in line for the
English throne and wasn't given British citizenship till he was 22,
so his first language couldn't have been English.
Then what did he speak before he was four years old?
Reading between lines, German by immersion, not by formal learning;
the German he formally learned might not have been the same as what
he spoke. The Hanseatic League towns to the north of him spoke Low German
but places to the south of him spoke High German. 3 million in places
around Hanover, even if not Hanover itself, still speak Low Saxon
according to an article about the German government's recent pledge to
preserve Low Saxon.
Don P
2018-05-11 23:45:32 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Dingbat
P.S. George II formally learned French and was formally taught German only
from the age of four. So, which was his first language - German or French?
Reading between the lines, he must have informally learned German
before and during his learning of French.
If he was taught French and taught German, then apparently he had no native
language at all. Unless, of course, his first language was English, in
which case the whole sentence is moot.
This is why Canada abandoned "native tongue" in the 1960s in favor of
mother tongue = language first learned and still understood. (Bilingual
in law and practice since the 18th century, Canada first debated laws on
this point in the 1960s.)
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ontario, Canada)
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-11 08:23:17 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by J. J. Lodder
The Queen's accent in 1947....
A contradiction in terms. The Queen doesn't have an accent.
She Speaks English, and English is what she speaks,
If you would have heard
"If you would have" is usually the mark of a non-native speaker, but
not in your case, I think.
Post by occam
her great-great-grandfather (Prince Albert of
Saxe-Coburg and Gotha) speak ze English, you wouldn't say that mein Herr.
--
athel
occam
2018-05-11 10:17:17 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by J. J. Lodder
The Queen's accent in 1947....
A contradiction in terms. The Queen doesn't have an accent.
She Speaks English, and English is what she speaks,
If you would have heard
"If you would have" is usually the mark of a non-native speaker, but not
in your case, I think.
I blame my German nanny.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-11 16:39:28 UTC
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Post by occam
Post by occam
Post by J. J. Lodder
The Queen's accent in 1947....
A contradiction in terms. The Queen doesn't have an accent.
She Speaks English, and English is what she speaks,
If you would have heard
"If you would have" is usually the mark of a non-native speaker, but not
in your case, I think.
I blame my German nanny.
That makes sense: I've mainly heard it from Germans (and Israelis). I
don't think the French usually say that: the lady I took lessons from
when we were first here was emphatic that the conditional could only be
used in the main clause of a sentence.
--
athel
Jerry Friedman
2018-05-11 21:06:13 UTC
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...
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by occam
Post by occam
If you would have heard
"If you would have" is usually the mark of a non-native speaker, but not
in your case, I think.
I blame my German nanny.
That makes sense: I've mainly heard it from Germans (and Israelis). I
don't think the French usually say that: the lady I took lessons from
when we were first here was emphatic that the conditional could only be
used in the main clause of a sentence.
But 91.4% of Americans say it.
--
Jerry Friedman
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-05-10 22:44:15 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
The Queen's accent in 1947....
A contradiction in terms. The Queen doesn't have an accent.
She Speaks English, and English is what she speaks,
Of course she has an accent. The Queen's English is
clearly distinct from RP.
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