Discussion:
Meta Lecture
(too old to reply)
the Omrud
2018-05-09 16:07:21 UTC
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Buried in the invitation to the AGM of a society I belong to, I found this:

/
Following the AGM we have a guest speaker, X, who will be talking to us
on 'That Certain Age' a lighthearted look at her life as a Guest Speaker.
/

So she'll be giving us a talk about what it's like to give talks to
people like us.
--
David
occam
2018-05-09 16:46:16 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
/
Following the AGM we have a guest speaker, X, who will be talking to us
on 'That Certain Age' a lighthearted look at her life as a Guest Speaker.
/
So she'll be giving us a talk about what it's like to give talks to
people like us.
You should prepare some Meta Questions for her to ponder on.
Garrett Wollman
2018-05-09 16:51:58 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
/
Following the AGM we have a guest speaker, X, who will be talking to us
on 'That Certain Age' a lighthearted look at her life as a Guest Speaker.
/
So she'll be giving us a talk about what it's like to give talks to
people like us.
I'm sure I've mentioned this here before, but Prof. Patrick Henry
Winston gives a lecture every January on lecturing and presentation
skills, for graduate students and postdocs. He calls it "HOW TO
SPEAK".

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-09 17:16:36 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by the Omrud
/
Following the AGM we have a guest speaker, X, who will be talking to us
on 'That Certain Age' a lighthearted look at her life as a Guest Speaker.
/
So she'll be giving us a talk about what it's like to give talks to
people like us.
I'm sure I've mentioned this here before, but Prof. Patrick Henry
Winston gives a lecture every January on lecturing and presentation
skills, for graduate students and postdocs. He calls it "HOW TO
SPEAK".
Another of David Crystal's 2017 books, *The Gift of the Gab: How Eloquence
Works*, is essentially that. It's entirely about structure and presentation
with nary a word on content. His main examples are Obama's speech to the
crowd in Chicago on Election Night 2008 and MLK's "Dream" speech of 1963.

He does not mention the use of either alliteration or allusion by both
orators.
Quinn C
2018-05-10 22:40:09 UTC
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Post by the Omrud
/
Following the AGM we have a guest speaker, X, who will be talking to us
on 'That Certain Age' a lighthearted look at her life as a Guest Speaker.
/
So she'll be giving us a talk about what it's like to give talks to
people like us.
There was this guy who left his secure job to create a podcasting
business. First thing he did was creating a podcast about this
experience. Now his story has been made into a TV show on a major US
network, casting the world of podcasts into the mainstream.

This is very exciting to many podcasters, so I heard some of my
favorite podcasters making podcasts about the TV show about a guy
making a podcast about creating a podcasting business.
--
The Eskimoes had fifty-two names for snow because it was
important to them, there ought to be as many for love.
-- Margaret Atwood, Surfacing (novel), p.106
David Kleinecke
2018-05-10 23:32:07 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by the Omrud
/
Following the AGM we have a guest speaker, X, who will be talking to us
on 'That Certain Age' a lighthearted look at her life as a Guest Speaker.
/
So she'll be giving us a talk about what it's like to give talks to
people like us.
There was this guy who left his secure job to create a podcasting
business. First thing he did was creating a podcast about this
experience. Now his story has been made into a TV show on a major US
network, casting the world of podcasts into the mainstream.
This is very exciting to many podcasters, so I heard some of my
favorite podcasters making podcasts about the TV show about a guy
making a podcast about creating a podcasting business.
I've never watched a podcast. Should I?
Quinn C
2018-05-11 00:44:14 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Quinn C
There was this guy who left his secure job to create a podcasting
business. First thing he did was creating a podcast about this
experience. Now his story has been made into a TV show on a major US
network, casting the world of podcasts into the mainstream.
This is very exciting to many podcasters, so I heard some of my
favorite podcasters making podcasts about the TV show about a guy
making a podcast about creating a podcasting business.
I've never watched a podcast. Should I?
ObAUE: I don't know if many people still insist that podcasts are audio
only, and the corresponding thing with video should be called vidcast
or something else. I doubt it, as I feel no one name has ever won the
competition.

So what are podcasts? There are a method of delivering audio or video
contents, typically serialized, over the Internet on demand.

Many of the podcasts I listen to (few of mine have video) are actually
radio programs, so the podcast is just another delivery vehicle for the
same content.

So they're nothing fundamentally different from radio or TV programs.

But many are amateur productions. It's actually quite simple and cheap
these days to make one yourself, which means that podcasts exist in a
greater variety than radio programs, which are subject to editorial and
time constraints. Also, being strictly on demand takes away the
restriction of having episodes of a fixed length.

I'm sure there are podcasts out there that would be of interest to you,
but whether they are worth giving up any of your other activities for
their sake is entirely your judgment. I probably spend more than 2 hrs
daily on them, but much of it while washing dishes, shaving, eating
etc.
--
WinErr 008: Erroneous error. Nothing is wrong.
Garrett Wollman
2018-05-11 02:03:09 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
ObAUE: I don't know if many people still insist that podcasts are audio
only, and the corresponding thing with video should be called vidcast
or something else. I doubt it, as I feel no one name has ever won the
competition.
Video podcasts were called "vodcasts" by many, back when you couldn't
watch videos on an iPod (the "pod" in "podcast"). Before that, they
were called "vlogs" (a blend of "video" and "blog").
Post by Quinn C
So what are podcasts? There are a method of delivering audio or video
contents, typically serialized, over the Internet on demand.
More specifically, using the same "syndication" (a misnomer)
technology as blogs: an RSS or Atom feed which lists a sequence of
"episodes" in some sort of meaningful order, to which new entries are
added (and from which old entries may be deleted), usually but not
always on a regular schedule. Even if you download them through the
Apple Store, Apple gets them via a feed from the publisher. (There
exist some podcasts that are proprietary to a specific platform, such
as Stitcher or Apple Podcasts, and they may have a different
distribution mechanism. But for your regular free-to-download podcast
that's not tied to a platform, RSS is the platform-neutral way they're
distributed.)
Post by Quinn C
Many of the podcasts I listen to (few of mine have video) are actually
radio programs, so the podcast is just another delivery vehicle for the
same content.
I would say that they are *all* radio programs. (Including many but
not all of the ones with video.) This is the distinction I've made
previously between radio-the-medium and radio-the-technology; podcasts
are one way of implementing the medium without using the technology.
(Some kinds of streaming represent another.)

I listen to a number of podcasts while driving -- although this time
of year I'm greatful for the summer hiatus a number of programs go on,
because when I'm bike commuting I'm not driving and therefore
accumulating un-listened-to episodes at a frightening clip. I
generally listen to Radiolab and On the Media from WNYC, Ideas and
Quirks & Quarks from CBC Radio One, Friday Night Comedy from BBC Radio
4, The Memory Palace from Radiotopia, and the commercial,
independently produced Gastropod.

ObAUE: Listen to Nicola Twilley's accent on Gastropod. It's very,
very odd to me -- she has RP stops (no flapped t's) and *some* of the
RP vowel system, but doesn't sound fully "British" to my ear, and I
can't quite tell what's odd about it. Rhotacism? (I've listened to
so much BrE and ErnNewEngE over the past two decades that my "ear" for
rhotacism has really deteriorated -- my brain just automatically fills
the missing r's back in.)

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Tak To
2018-05-11 16:24:12 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Quinn C
ObAUE: I don't know if many people still insist that podcasts are audio
only, and the corresponding thing with video should be called vidcast
or something else. I doubt it, as I feel no one name has ever won the
competition.
Video podcasts were called "vodcasts" by many, back when you couldn't
watch videos on an iPod (the "pod" in "podcast"). Before that, they
were called "vlogs" (a blend of "video" and "blog").
Post by Quinn C
So what are podcasts? There are a method of delivering audio or video
contents, typically serialized, over the Internet on demand.
More specifically, using the same "syndication" (a misnomer)
technology as blogs: an RSS or Atom feed which lists a sequence of
"episodes" in some sort of meaningful order, to which new entries are
added (and from which old entries may be deleted), usually but not
always on a regular schedule. Even if you download them through the
Apple Store, Apple gets them via a feed from the publisher. (There
exist some podcasts that are proprietary to a specific platform, such
as Stitcher or Apple Podcasts, and they may have a different
distribution mechanism. But for your regular free-to-download podcast
that's not tied to a platform, RSS is the platform-neutral way they're
distributed.)
While browsers such as Firebird or mail-readers such as
Thunderbird can handle RSS/Atom feeds quite nicely, I do
recommend using a specialized app on the smartphone
for downloading and listening (or viewing) to podcasts.

I am using Podcast Republic on my Android based phone.
One of the features I like is that one can adjust the play
back speed to be faster than normal for listening -- my
default setting is 1.1. There are other convenience
features such as automatically skipping <n> initial seconds
for each episode of a podcast, adjustable forward and backward
skip intervals, automatically repeating <n> secs after an
interruption, a "car mode" display, etc.

Because of the small amount of storage available on my
smartphone, I cannot set my app to automatically download
all new episodes on my favorite podcasts. I have to
manually download everything. For certain podcasts
I actually download every episode on my stationary PC
(using iTune), create an RSS feed my on PC and then
selectively download episodes to my smartphone.
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Quinn C
Many of the podcasts I listen to (few of mine have video) are actually
radio programs, so the podcast is just another delivery vehicle for the
same content.
I would say that they are *all* radio programs. (Including many but
not all of the ones with video.) This is the distinction I've made
previously between radio-the-medium and radio-the-technology; podcasts
are one way of implementing the medium without using the technology.
(Some kinds of streaming represent another.)
Podcast is just on-demand + serialization. (I suppose the latter
implies the former to some extend.)

Some of the podcasts that I listen regularly to are actually
videos. (None of them are US based.) The visual aspect is usually
not that important -- panel discussions, etc. I think the only
reason that they are not purely audio is that the producers think
that the younger generation is not interested in anything that is
purely audio.
Post by Garrett Wollman
I listen to a number of podcasts while driving -- although this time
of year I'm greatful for the summer hiatus a number of programs go on,
because when I'm bike commuting I'm not driving and therefore
accumulating un-listened-to episodes at a frightening clip. I
generally listen to Radiolab and On the Media from WNYC, Ideas and
Quirks & Quarks from CBC Radio One, Friday Night Comedy from BBC Radio
4, The Memory Palace from Radiotopia, and the commercial,
independently produced Gastropod.
For me, /Wait Wait Don't Tell Me/ and /Ask Me Another/ regularly,
and selectively /Intelligence Squared US/ and /Intelligence
Squared (UK)/. (These are just the more popular ones.)

Btw, I actually dislike the format found in /Radiolab/ in which
someone starts to speak and then the reporter/host speaks
over it -- an audio-only voice over so to speak. Very
distracting.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Peter Moylan
2018-05-12 03:11:05 UTC
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Btw, I actually dislike the format found in/Radiolab/ in which
someone starts to speak and then the reporter/host speaks over it --
an audio-only voice over so to speak. Very distracting.
We often get that on the news. The voice-over is an English translation,
while the original speaker is hardly audible.

SBS, our foreign-language network, does a better job. The English
translation is a written subtitle, so that you can hear what the speaker
is saying. (Which is not always what the English version says.)
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Tak To
2018-05-12 15:55:26 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Btw, I actually dislike the format found in /Radiolab/ in which
someone starts to speak and then the reporter/host speaks over it --
an audio-only voice over so to speak. Very distracting.
We often get that on the news. The voice-over is an English translation,
while the original speaker is hardly audible.
I don't mind so much when it is a translation, but a lot
of times on /Radiolab/ and other radio programs the voice
over is paraphrasing the speaker to fit the context and/or
to shorten the time. For example,

Reporter: Prof P at University U has done extensive
research in the area of A.

Prof P: <talking about an experiment> ...

(A couple of sentence into Prof P's speech, the volume
of his/her voice is lowered to barely audible and the
voice over starts.)

Reporter: Prof P has found in an experiment that...
Post by Peter Moylan
SBS, our foreign-language network, does a better job. The English
translation is a written subtitle, so that you can hear what the speaker
is saying. (Which is not always what the English version says.)
Now you are talking about TV programs. Were you talking
about radio or TV programs?
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Peter Moylan
2018-05-13 05:06:14 UTC
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Post by Tak To
Post by Peter Moylan
Btw, I actually dislike the format found in /Radiolab/ in which
someone starts to speak and then the reporter/host speaks over it --
an audio-only voice over so to speak. Very distracting.
We often get that on the news. The voice-over is an English translation,
while the original speaker is hardly audible.
I don't mind so much when it is a translation, but a lot
of times on /Radiolab/ and other radio programs the voice
over is paraphrasing the speaker to fit the context and/or
to shorten the time. For example,
Reporter: Prof P at University U has done extensive
research in the area of A.
Prof P: <talking about an experiment> ...
(A couple of sentence into Prof P's speech, the volume
of his/her voice is lowered to barely audible and the
voice over starts.)
Reporter: Prof P has found in an experiment that...
Post by Peter Moylan
SBS, our foreign-language network, does a better job. The English
translation is a written subtitle, so that you can hear what the speaker
is saying. (Which is not always what the English version says.)
Now you are talking about TV programs. Were you talking
about radio or TV programs?
TV. Sorry, I forgot that the discussion was focused on radio.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-11 03:20:51 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Quinn C
There was this guy who left his secure job to create a podcasting
business. First thing he did was creating a podcast about this
experience. Now his story has been made into a TV show on a major US
network, casting the world of podcasts into the mainstream.
This is very exciting to many podcasters, so I heard some of my
favorite podcasters making podcasts about the TV show about a guy
making a podcast about creating a podcasting business.
I've never watched a podcast. Should I?
ObAUE: I don't know if many people still insist that podcasts are audio
only, and the corresponding thing with video should be called vidcast
or something else. I doubt it, as I feel no one name has ever won the
competition.
So what are podcasts? There are a method of delivering audio or video
contents, typically serialized, over the Internet on demand.
Many of the podcasts I listen to (few of mine have video) are actually
radio programs, so the podcast is just another delivery vehicle for the
same content.
So they're nothing fundamentally different from radio or TV programs.
But many are amateur productions. It's actually quite simple and cheap
these days to make one yourself, which means that podcasts exist in a
greater variety than radio programs, which are subject to editorial and
time constraints. Also, being strictly on demand takes away the
restriction of having episodes of a fixed length.
I'm sure there are podcasts out there that would be of interest to you,
but whether they are worth giving up any of your other activities for
their sake is entirely your judgment. I probably spend more than 2 hrs
daily on them, but much of it while washing dishes, shaving, eating
etc.
It takes far far longer to hear a podcast than it would to read the script.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-11 08:02:56 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Quinn C
There was this guy who left his secure job to create a podcasting
business. First thing he did was creating a podcast about this
experience. Now his story has been made into a TV show on a major US
network, casting the world of podcasts into the mainstream.
This is very exciting to many podcasters, so I heard some of my
favorite podcasters making podcasts about the TV show about a guy
making a podcast about creating a podcasting business.
I've never watched a podcast. Should I?
ObAUE: I don't know if many people still insist that podcasts are audio
only, and the corresponding thing with video should be called vidcast
or something else. I doubt it, as I feel no one name has ever won the
competition.
So what are podcasts? There are a method of delivering audio or video
contents, typically serialized, over the Internet on demand.
Many of the podcasts I listen to (few of mine have video) are actually
radio programs, so the podcast is just another delivery vehicle for the
same content.
So they're nothing fundamentally different from radio or TV programs.
But many are amateur productions. It's actually quite simple and cheap
these days to make one yourself, which means that podcasts exist in a
greater variety than radio programs, which are subject to editorial and
time constraints. Also, being strictly on demand takes away the
restriction of having episodes of a fixed length.
I'm sure there are podcasts out there that would be of interest to you,
but whether they are worth giving up any of your other activities for
their sake is entirely your judgment. I probably spend more than 2 hrs
daily on them, but much of it while washing dishes, shaving, eating
etc.
It takes far far longer to hear a podcast than it would to read the script.
Yes. That's the problem with a lot of videos.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-11 12:51:26 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Quinn C
There was this guy who left his secure job to create a podcasting
business. First thing he did was creating a podcast about this
experience. Now his story has been made into a TV show on a major US
network, casting the world of podcasts into the mainstream.
This is very exciting to many podcasters, so I heard some of my
favorite podcasters making podcasts about the TV show about a guy
making a podcast about creating a podcasting business.
I've never watched a podcast. Should I?
ObAUE: I don't know if many people still insist that podcasts are audio
only, and the corresponding thing with video should be called vidcast
or something else. I doubt it, as I feel no one name has ever won the
competition.
So what are podcasts? There are a method of delivering audio or video
contents, typically serialized, over the Internet on demand.
Many of the podcasts I listen to (few of mine have video) are actually
radio programs, so the podcast is just another delivery vehicle for the
same content.
So they're nothing fundamentally different from radio or TV programs.
But many are amateur productions. It's actually quite simple and cheap
these days to make one yourself, which means that podcasts exist in a
greater variety than radio programs, which are subject to editorial and
time constraints. Also, being strictly on demand takes away the
restriction of having episodes of a fixed length.
I'm sure there are podcasts out there that would be of interest to you,
but whether they are worth giving up any of your other activities for
their sake is entirely your judgment. I probably spend more than 2 hrs
daily on them, but much of it while washing dishes, shaving, eating
etc.
It takes far far longer to hear a podcast than it would to read the script.
Yes. That's the problem with a lot of videos.
OTOH, I have WNYC on all day, and sometimes I stop tuning out and I hear
interesting or useful stories, and not infrequently they're excerpts from
podcasts by WNYC reporters. For instance, "Trump Inc." is getting a lot of
attention and airplay these days -- two local reporters are having a ball
going through the city and state records of real estate transactions. Just
this morning, they reported that, unlike any other real estate developer
in the known world, Trump in his last decade or so was acquiring properties
(mostly golf courses) for cash rather than with loans/mortgages. They pointed
to two in particular, one in Scotland, one in Ireland, that were hugely
expensive money pits. (Maybe _that's_ how one loses money on casinos.)
Tak To
2018-05-11 18:15:30 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Quinn C
There was this guy who left his secure job to create a podcasting
business. First thing he did was creating a podcast about this
experience. Now his story has been made into a TV show on a major US
network, casting the world of podcasts into the mainstream.
This is very exciting to many podcasters, so I heard some of my
favorite podcasters making podcasts about the TV show about a guy
making a podcast about creating a podcasting business.
I've never watched a podcast. Should I?
ObAUE: I don't know if many people still insist that podcasts are audio
only, and the corresponding thing with video should be called vidcast
or something else. I doubt it, as I feel no one name has ever won the
competition.
So what are podcasts? There are a method of delivering audio or video
contents, typically serialized, over the Internet on demand.
Many of the podcasts I listen to (few of mine have video) are actually
radio programs, so the podcast is just another delivery vehicle for the
same content.
So they're nothing fundamentally different from radio or TV programs.
But many are amateur productions. It's actually quite simple and cheap
these days to make one yourself, which means that podcasts exist in a
greater variety than radio programs, which are subject to editorial and
time constraints. Also, being strictly on demand takes away the
restriction of having episodes of a fixed length.
I'm sure there are podcasts out there that would be of interest to you,
but whether they are worth giving up any of your other activities for
their sake is entirely your judgment. I probably spend more than 2 hrs
daily on them, but much of it while washing dishes, shaving, eating
etc.
It takes far far longer to hear a podcast than it would to read the script.
Scripts? 99.99% of all podcasts have no scripts.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-11 18:45:23 UTC
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Post by Tak To
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It takes far far longer to hear a podcast than it would to read the script.
Scripts? 99.99% of all podcasts have no scripts.
When they're transcribed, there's a script.
Tak To
2018-05-11 19:41:02 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tak To
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It takes far far longer to hear a podcast than it would to read the script.
Scripts? 99.99% of all podcasts have no scripts.
When they're transcribed, there's a script.
99.99% of all podcasts are not transcribed.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-05-11 20:03:11 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tak To
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It takes far far longer to hear a podcast than it would to read the script.
Scripts? 99.99% of all podcasts have no scripts.
When they're transcribed, there's a script.
No. There's a transcript! Scripts precede performance,
transcripts follow performance.
Tony Cooper
2018-05-11 20:09:46 UTC
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On Fri, 11 May 2018 13:03:11 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tak To
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It takes far far longer to hear a podcast than it would to read the script.
Scripts? 99.99% of all podcasts have no scripts.
When they're transcribed, there's a script.
No. There's a transcript! Scripts precede performance,
transcripts follow performance.
A transcript of one of Trump's speeches reveals where he went
off-script. And, off-the-rails, for that matter.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-05-11 23:35:48 UTC
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On Fri, 11 May 2018 13:03:11 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tak To
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It takes far far longer to hear a podcast than it would to read the script.
Scripts? 99.99% of all podcasts have no scripts.
When they're transcribed, there's a script.
No. There's a transcript! Scripts precede performance,
Writting before: Prescription?
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
transcripts follow performance.
Writing after: Postscription?

Joint authorship: Conscription?
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Tony Cooper
2018-05-12 00:25:15 UTC
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On Sat, 12 May 2018 00:35:48 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 11 May 2018 13:03:11 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tak To
Post by Peter T. Daniels
It takes far far longer to hear a podcast than it would to read the script.
Scripts? 99.99% of all podcasts have no scripts.
When they're transcribed, there's a script.
No. There's a transcript! Scripts precede performance,
Writting before: Prescription?
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
transcripts follow performance.
Writing after: Postscription?
Joint authorship: Conscription?
Conscription is a used car salesman's written promise.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Quinn C
2018-05-11 21:36:57 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Tak To
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
I'm sure there are podcasts out there that would be of interest to you,
but whether they are worth giving up any of your other activities for
their sake is entirely your judgment. I probably spend more than 2 hrs
daily on them, but much of it while washing dishes, shaving, eating
etc.
It takes far far longer to hear a podcast than it would to read the script.
And yet, talk radio hasn't died.
Post by Tak To
Scripts? 99.99% of all podcasts have no scripts.
That's surely exaggerated. Especially if you include those that are
produced by professional outlets like the ones producing for NPR, BBC
etc.

But it's true that many don't have scripts or transcripts.

Plus, I'm not going to read the script while eating, doing the dishes
or driving.

Plus, the many podcasts that are more or less spontaneous conversations
may lose a lot of their emotional impact in a transcript.
--
Java is kind of like kindergarten. There are lots of rules you
have to remember. If you don't follow them, the compiler makes
you sit in the corner until you do.
Don Raab
Tak To
2018-05-12 01:38:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by Tak To
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
I'm sure there are podcasts out there that would be of interest to you,
but whether they are worth giving up any of your other activities for
their sake is entirely your judgment. I probably spend more than 2 hrs
daily on them, but much of it while washing dishes, shaving, eating
etc.
It takes far far longer to hear a podcast than it would to read the script.
And yet, talk radio hasn't died.
Post by Tak To
Scripts? 99.99% of all podcasts have no scripts.
That's surely exaggerated. Especially if you include those that are
produced by professional outlets like the ones producing for NPR, BBC
etc.
But it's true that many don't have scripts or transcripts.
Plus, I'm not going to read the script while eating, doing the dishes
or driving.
Plus, the many podcasts that are more or less spontaneous conversations
may lose a lot of their emotional impact in a transcript.
You don't have to convince me.

Plus podcast that are music related, etc.

One of the longest running podcast produced by an individual is
PodQuiz[1]. It is a weekly trivia quiz show and is current at episode
684. It always have questions related to music and often other
audio questions.

[1] Available at most aggregators as well as at Podquiz.com, which
also has a complete archive.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
RH Draney
2018-05-12 02:30:37 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tak To
Post by Quinn C
Plus, the many podcasts that are more or less spontaneous conversations
may lose a lot of their emotional impact in a transcript.
You don't have to convince me.
Plus podcast that are music related, etc.
One of the longest running podcast produced by an individual is
PodQuiz[1]. It is a weekly trivia quiz show and is current at episode
684. It always have questions related to music and often other
audio questions.
At the other extreme is the first podcast I considered subscribing to:
The Dawn Of Sound, consisting of recordings from the cylinder recording
era...unfortunately, they only did two episodes of it at an interval of
nearly a year (the second was all Christmas recordings)....r
Garrett Wollman
2018-05-12 03:53:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RH Draney
Post by Tak To
One of the longest running podcast produced by an individual is
PodQuiz[1]. It is a weekly trivia quiz show and is current at episode
684. It always have questions related to music and often other
audio questions.
The Dawn Of Sound, consisting of recordings from the cylinder recording
era...unfortunately, they only did two episodes of it at an interval of
nearly a year (the second was all Christmas recordings)....r
Somewhere in between is Nate DiMeo's "The Memory Palace", which seems
to be on one of its occasional hiatuses at the moment, which started
out independent, was distributed by Maximum Fun for a while, stopped
production for a while, and then resumed production as a part of the
Radiotopia network. It's about 15 minutes long, issued irregularly,
focusing on the quirky or poorly-understood circumstances of some
event in US history. (Current episode is number 125 and he's been
doing it for about 9-1/2 years, so that averages a little over one
episode a month.) DiMeo started out as a producer at NPR West, but
there are no interviews or vo-sots in "The Memory Palace", just
DiMeo's narration, sometimes with some very spare background music.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Tak To
2018-05-12 20:09:51 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by RH Draney
Post by Tak To
One of the longest running podcast produced by an individual is
PodQuiz[1]. It is a weekly trivia quiz show and is current at episode
684. It always have questions related to music and often other
audio questions.
The Dawn Of Sound, consisting of recordings from the cylinder recording
era...unfortunately, they only did two episodes of it at an interval of
nearly a year (the second was all Christmas recordings)....r
Somewhere in between is Nate DiMeo's "The Memory Palace", which seems
to be on one of its occasional hiatuses at the moment, which started
out independent, was distributed by Maximum Fun for a while, stopped
production for a while, and then resumed production as a part of the
Radiotopia network. It's about 15 minutes long, issued irregularly,
focusing on the quirky or poorly-understood circumstances of some
event in US history. (Current episode is number 125 and he's been
doing it for about 9-1/2 years, so that averages a little over one
episode a month.) DiMeo started out as a producer at NPR West, but
there are no interviews or vo-sots in "The Memory Palace", just
DiMeo's narration, sometimes with some very spare background music.
ObAUE: I forgot that these days it is increasingly common to used
the word "network" for podcast aggregator and publisher sites
(and the respective underlying organizations). I have less problem
with this than the similar extension of "network" in cable TV lingo
to mean large producers such as HBO and Showtime, since most podcast
networks are in fact collectives of some sort. However, I find it
extremely incongruent when Radiotopia calls itself "a curated network
of extraordinary, story-driven shows". I just don't see shows
as intersecting points (in which case the paths are what?) or
sentient beings exchanging information with neighbors.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-12 21:44:25 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tak To
ObAUE: I forgot that these days it is increasingly common to used
the word "network" for podcast aggregator and publisher sites
(and the respective underlying organizations). I have less problem
with this than the similar extension of "network" in cable TV lingo
to mean large producers such as HBO and Showtime, since most podcast
networks are in fact collectives of some sort. However, I find it
extremely incongruent when Radiotopia calls itself "a curated network
of extraordinary, story-driven shows". I just don't see shows
as intersecting points (in which case the paths are what?) or
sentient beings exchanging information with neighbors.
Why? Is that the definition of "network" in "television network" (meaning
ABC CBS Fox NBC The CW)?
Tak To
2018-05-13 03:13:14 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tak To
ObAUE: I forgot that these days it is increasingly common to used
the word "network" for podcast aggregator and publisher sites
(and the respective underlying organizations). I have less problem
with this than the similar extension of "network" in cable TV lingo
to mean large producers such as HBO and Showtime, since most podcast
networks are in fact collectives of some sort. However, I find it
extremely incongruent when Radiotopia calls itself "a curated network
of extraordinary, story-driven shows". I just don't see shows
as intersecting points (in which case the paths are what?) or
sentient beings exchanging information with neighbors.
Why? Is that the definition of "network" in "television network" (meaning
ABC CBS Fox NBC The CW)?
I supposed you meant "Isn't that...?"

Well, ABC, for example, is a network of stations that air shows,
not a network of shows.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Garrett Wollman
2018-05-13 03:44:36 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tak To
Well, ABC, for example, is a network of stations that air shows,
not a network of shows.
Well, it's a distributor that funnels money from broadcast stations to
program producers (including its parent company Disney), and operates
a satellite and terrestrial transmission system that allows the
stations that pay it money to live-stream those shows or download them
for later broadcast, including the right to insert locality-specific
advertising.

ABC began its life as the Blue Network of NBC, but even in the 1930s,
the "network" per se was owned and operated by the Bell System, not
NBC. AT&T operated the telephone lines that connected New York and
Chicago, Los Angeles and San Francisco, leased access to them to the
four radio networks, and was responsible for delivering the audio
signals to and from each affiliate station by connecting them to Long
Lines offices. The network signal might be carried through the cities
where the networks operated, but only rarely did they actually go
through the *stations* -- in modern graph-theoretical terminology,
AT&T Long Lines owned and operated all of the internal nodes, and
reconfigured them into a spanning tree rooted at whichever node was
nearest the origination point for a particular network program; the
network affiliates were (nearly) all leaf nodes. Many networks also
distributed prerecorded programs on transcription disks (like
long-playing records, but earlier technology, typically recorded on
aluminum blanks).

The signal degradation inherent in retransmitting AM signals was such
that this was rarely done -- if you could get a good enough signal
from a neighboring station to retransmit, that probably meant that you
were witin that station's exclusive territory and wouldn't be allowed
to affiliate with the same network (at least not on a primary basis).
You didn't see real over-the-air networking until the late 1930s when
the superior noise floor of VHF-FM radio made it practical. The
earliest FM network broadcasts occurred over Major Armstrong's
station, W2XMN in Alpine, New Jersey, and were retransmitted by
Franklin Doolittle's station in Connecticut (I think W1XPW?) and the
GE station in Schenectady. Later, the commercial Yankee Network in
New England, the Rural Radio Network in Upstate New York, and the
Concert Network in New York and southern New England used similar FM
rebroadcast technology. However, although FM had much lower noise
than AM, especially during summer weather, it was still higher than a
direct telephone line, and of course depended on every station on the
chain operating properly, carrying the same programming, and paying
attention to the network cues, so this system fell out of use by the
end of the 1970s. Some translators are still fed this way.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-13 13:45:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tak To
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tak To
ObAUE: I forgot that these days it is increasingly common to used
the word "network" for podcast aggregator and publisher sites
(and the respective underlying organizations). I have less problem
with this than the similar extension of "network" in cable TV lingo
to mean large producers such as HBO and Showtime, since most podcast
networks are in fact collectives of some sort. However, I find it
extremely incongruent when Radiotopia calls itself "a curated network
of extraordinary, story-driven shows". I just don't see shows
as intersecting points (in which case the paths are what?) or
sentient beings exchanging information with neighbors.
Why? Is that the definition of "network" in "television network" (meaning
ABC CBS Fox NBC The CW)?
I supposed you meant "Isn't that...?"
No; I don't see that the mathematical (game theory?) definition of
"network," which you provide above, applies to the broadcast networks
at all. I suppose you've merely succumbed to the etymological fallacy.
Post by Tak To
Well, ABC, for example, is a network of stations that air shows,
not a network of shows.
How is a group of stations showing the same programming for several hours
a day "intersecting points" of "paths"? A few of the stations -- it used
to be limited to 5 -- are owned by the parent company itself, but most of
them are independently owned yet are still part of the network.

Garrett Wollman
2018-05-13 02:29:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tak To
ObAUE: I forgot that these days it is increasingly common to used
the word "network" for podcast aggregator and publisher sites
(and the respective underlying organizations). I have less problem
with this than the similar extension of "network" in cable TV lingo
to mean large producers such as HBO and Showtime, since most podcast
networks are in fact collectives of some sort. However, I find it
extremely incongruent when Radiotopia calls itself "a curated network
of extraordinary, story-driven shows". I just don't see shows
as intersecting points (in which case the paths are what?) or
sentient beings exchanging information with neighbors.
Well, Radiotopia is part of PRX and this part of the public-radio
ecosystem, where all of the national program distributors call
themselves "networks" in their public communications, even when the
"network" is just a server from which people (or stations) who
subscribe to programs can download a show for later playback.
The "network" of course also has the complementary function of routing
station or individual membership fees back to the program producers,
just as NPR/PRI/APM/PRX/PBS/APT do.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Tak To
2018-05-13 03:33:42 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Garrett Wollman
Post by Tak To
ObAUE: I forgot that these days it is increasingly common to used
the word "network" for podcast aggregator and publisher sites
(and the respective underlying organizations). I have less problem
with this than the similar extension of "network" in cable TV lingo
to mean large producers such as HBO and Showtime, since most podcast
networks are in fact collectives of some sort. However, I find it
extremely incongruent when Radiotopia calls itself "a curated network
of extraordinary, story-driven shows". I just don't see shows
as intersecting points (in which case the paths are what?) or
sentient beings exchanging information with neighbors.
Well, Radiotopia is part of PRX and this part of the public-radio
ecosystem, where all of the national program distributors call
themselves "networks" in their public communications, even when the
"network" is just a server from which people (or stations) who
subscribe to programs can download a show for later playback.
IMHO, the meaning of "network" is already over-extended
here. A site is not a network.
Post by Garrett Wollman
The "network" of course also has the complementary function of routing
station or individual membership fees back to the program producers,
just as NPR/PRI/APM/PRX/PBS/APT do.
In the world of internet media, there is simply no counter part
to the concept of "station" in (North American) broadcast. Thus
there is really no justification of using "network" except for
the word's implied scale and importance. (IMHO)

In any case, my problem is not that Radiotopia/Prx calls itself
a "network", but that it calls itself "a network of shows".
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-12 14:19:27 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by RH Draney
Post by Tak To
Post by Quinn C
Plus, the many podcasts that are more or less spontaneous conversations
may lose a lot of their emotional impact in a transcript.
You don't have to convince me.
Plus podcast that are music related, etc.
One of the longest running podcast produced by an individual is
PodQuiz[1]. It is a weekly trivia quiz show and is current at episode
684. It always have questions related to music and often other
audio questions.
The Dawn Of Sound, consisting of recordings from the cylinder recording
era...unfortunately, they only did two episodes of it at an interval of
nearly a year (the second was all Christmas recordings)....r
WFMT's Andy Karzas did a half hour program every week for many years
called "From the Recording Horn." As the programs were sometimes repeated,
presumably they're archived somewhere. They drew on his immense collection of acoustic-era disks and even cylinders. (Sometimes he even strayed into
the electric era).
Pavel Svinchnik
2018-05-11 02:57:33 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Quinn C
Post by the Omrud
/
Following the AGM we have a guest speaker, X, who will be talking to us
on 'That Certain Age' a lighthearted look at her life as a Guest Speaker.
/
So she'll be giving us a talk about what it's like to give talks to
people like us.
There was this guy who left his secure job to create a podcasting
business. First thing he did was creating a podcast about this
experience. Now his story has been made into a TV show on a major US
network, casting the world of podcasts into the mainstream.
This is very exciting to many podcasters, so I heard some of my
favorite podcasters making podcasts about the TV show about a guy
making a podcast about creating a podcasting business.
I've never watched a podcast. Should I?
Let him who is without sin cast the first pod.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-05-11 08:01:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Quinn C
Post by the Omrud
/
Following the AGM we have a guest speaker, X, who will be talking to us
on 'That Certain Age' a lighthearted look at her life as a Guest Speaker.
/
So she'll be giving us a talk about what it's like to give talks to
people like us.
There was this guy who left his secure job to create a podcasting
business. First thing he did was creating a podcast about this
experience. Now his story has been made into a TV show on a major US
network, casting the world of podcasts into the mainstream.
This is very exciting to many podcasters, so I heard some of my
favorite podcasters making podcasts about the TV show about a guy
making a podcast about creating a podcasting business.
I've never watched a podcast.
I haven't either (not knowingly, anyway). I'm not sure I know what a
podcast is, so Hen Harrison will be along in a moment to tell us all
how out of touch I am with the modern world.
Post by David Kleinecke
Should I?
--
athel
Tak To
2018-05-11 18:05:23 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Quinn C
Post by the Omrud
/
Following the AGM we have a guest speaker, X, who will be talking to us
on 'That Certain Age' a lighthearted look at her life as a Guest Speaker.
/
So she'll be giving us a talk about what it's like to give talks to
people like us.
There was this guy who left his secure job to create a podcasting
business. First thing he did was creating a podcast about this
experience. Now his story has been made into a TV show on a major US
network, casting the world of podcasts into the mainstream.
This is very exciting to many podcasters, so I heard some of my
favorite podcasters making podcasts about the TV show about a guy
making a podcast about creating a podcasting business.
I've never watched a podcast.
I haven't either (not knowingly, anyway). I'm not sure I know what a
podcast is, so Hen Harrison will be along in a moment to tell us all
how out of touch I am with the modern world.
Post by David Kleinecke
Should I?
A podcast is a serialization of (on-demand) audio or audio-visual
presentations. Alternatively, an episode within a series can also
be called a podcast.

The serialization in the most basic form is a RSS file, which
is a structured text file (very much like a HTML file) that
lists all the urls of each episode in that series. The delivery
of the RSS file is typically via HTTP but is not tied to it.
The list and the episodes need not reside on the same site.

A listener program is similar to a news reader. It can keep
track of which episodes are new and download specified episodes
(if they are downloadable).

A podcast is like a magazine. There are aggregator sites the
function of which is similar to that of newsstands for magazine.
They are often tied to listener programs but any decent listener
program would allow the user to type in an arbitrary url for
the list.

There are also sites the function of which is similar to that
of publication houses for magazines. NPR is one of them. One
copies the urls of the lists one wants and enter them into
one's listener program.

One of the biggest aggregator is iTuneStore, but for the average
AUErs I would recommend as a first try going to the NPR site to
browse their offering. NPR also have a smartphone app that one
can download from either Apple or Google.

To answer David K's original question: one should at least know
what podcasts are out there.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-05-11 19:13:03 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Fri, 11 May 2018 10:01:47 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Quinn C
Post by the Omrud
/
Following the AGM we have a guest speaker, X, who will be talking to us
on 'That Certain Age' a lighthearted look at her life as a Guest Speaker.
/
So she'll be giving us a talk about what it's like to give talks to
people like us.
There was this guy who left his secure job to create a podcasting
business. First thing he did was creating a podcast about this
experience. Now his story has been made into a TV show on a major US
network, casting the world of podcasts into the mainstream.
This is very exciting to many podcasters, so I heard some of my
favorite podcasters making podcasts about the TV show about a guy
making a podcast about creating a podcasting business.
I've never watched a podcast.
I haven't either (not knowingly, anyway). I'm not sure I know what a
podcast is, so Hen Harrison will be along in a moment to tell us all
how out of touch I am with the modern world.
In parallel with Tak To's reply:

The name "podcast" originated from "iPod + broadcast".
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/us/podcast
podcast
noun

A digital audio file made available on the Internet for downloading
to a computer or mobile device, typically available as a series, new
installments of which can be received by subscribers automatically.

The BBC offers podcasts of radio programmes, for example this episode of
the World Service Tech Tent:
https://www.bbc.co.uk/programmes/w3cswnl1

Who's Watching You Online?
Tech Tent

Facebook's boss Mark Zuckerberg tells the US Congress that users
control their data - but do they really? We examine how more
information is gathered about you than you might think. And we ask
how deeply the University of Cambridge is involved in the Facebook
data scandal. Vesselin Popov from the Psychometrics Centre at the
university responds. Presented by Rory Cellan-Jones, with BBC tech
reporter Zoe Kleinman, and special guest Frederike Kaltheuner from
Privacy International.

All available BBC podcasts:
http://www.bbc.co.uk/podcasts

They can be downloaded (mp3) or played online.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-05-11 03:19:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by the Omrud
/
Following the AGM we have a guest speaker, X, who will be talking to us
on 'That Certain Age' a lighthearted look at her life as a Guest Speaker.
/
So she'll be giving us a talk about what it's like to give talks to
people like us.
There was this guy who left his secure job to create a podcasting
business. First thing he did was creating a podcast about this
experience. Now his story has been made into a TV show on a major US
network, casting the world of podcasts into the mainstream.
This is very exciting to many podcasters, so I heard some of my
favorite podcasters making podcasts about the TV show about a guy
making a podcast about creating a podcasting business.
I've never heard a podcast, except when they're broadcast on WNYC, but *Alex Inc.* is a highly literate sitcom starring Zach Braff, who was
*Scrubs* for almost ten seasons and made some good indie movies after that.
Tak To
2018-05-11 17:23:56 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by the Omrud
/
Following the AGM we have a guest speaker, X, who will be talking to us
on 'That Certain Age' a lighthearted look at her life as a Guest Speaker.
/
So she'll be giving us a talk about what it's like to give talks to
people like us.
There was this guy who left his secure job to create a podcasting
business. First thing he did was creating a podcast about this
experience. Now his story has been made into a TV show on a major US
network, casting the world of podcasts into the mainstream.
This is very exciting to many podcasters, so I heard some of my
favorite podcasters making podcasts about the TV show about a guy
making a podcast about creating a podcasting business.
The main issue with podcast today is discovery. I do not
like the reliance on aggregators such as iTuneStore. I think
the only long term solution is for the search engines to
recognize podcast as a separate category similar to "video".
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Tak To
2018-05-11 18:28:47 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by the Omrud
/
Following the AGM we have a guest speaker, X, who will be talking to us
on 'That Certain Age' a lighthearted look at her life as a Guest Speaker.
/
So she'll be giving us a talk about what it's like to give talks to
people like us.
There are plenty of novels and screenplays which basically
say nothing other than that the writer is unable to write.
So what else is new?

The film /True Story/ starring Jonah Hill is about the real
life disgraced reporter Michael Finkel chasing down a story
that turned out not to be a story. It is based on a book
by, surprise surprise, Michael Finkel.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
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