Discussion:
Staunch
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Tony Cooper
2018-02-04 05:30:20 UTC
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The following sentence appeared in an article in _The Washington
Post_:

"On Saturday, news of Hartnett White’s withdrawal triggered relief
among some of her staunchest critics."

I'm having trouble with "staunchest" in that context. Using "loyal
and committed in attitude" as a definition of "staunch", I don't see
it being used with "critic". "Fiercest critics", maybe, but critics
don't stand by you; they stand against you.

It's usually supporters of something or someone that are "staunchest".

If you need to know the subject, Trump wanted to appoint Kathleen
Hartnett White to head the Council on Environmental Quality. Members
of the scientific community opposed the appointment because of her
stated positions on the causes of climate change.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mark Brader
2018-02-04 06:27:55 UTC
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Tony Cooper:
> The following sentence appeared in an article in _The Washington
> Post_:
>
> "On Saturday, news of Hartnett White's withdrawal triggered relief
> among some of her staunchest critics."
>
> I'm having trouble with "staunchest" in that context. Using "loyal
> and committed in attitude" as a definition of "staunch", I don't see
> it being used with "critic"...
>
> It's usually supporters of something or someone that are "staunchest".

I think it makes sense. These are people who have been loyal and
committted to the position that Hartnett White is to be opposed.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Courtesy, hell. We're programmers not humans."
***@vex.net | -- S. M. Ryan
occam
2018-02-04 08:27:24 UTC
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On 04/02/2018 06:30, Tony Cooper wrote:
> The following sentence appeared in an article in _The Washington
> Post_:
>
> "On Saturday, news of Hartnett White’s withdrawal triggered relief
> among some of her staunchest critics."
>
> I'm having trouble with "staunchest" in that context. Using "loyal
> and committed in attitude" as a definition of "staunch", I don't see
> it being used with "critic". "Fiercest critics", maybe, but critics
> don't stand by you; they stand against you.
>
> It's usually supporters of something or someone that are "staunchest".
>
> If you need to know the subject, Trump wanted to appoint Kathleen
> Hartnett White to head the Council on Environmental Quality. Members
> of the scientific community opposed the appointment because of her
> stated positions on the causes of climate change.
>

Both 'staunchest' and 'fiercest' work, as do 'harshest', 'most ardent'
and 'vocal'.

I agree fiercest is better ('staunch' has a positive connotation
associated with support, cf. devoted), however the definition of staunch
allows it.
LFS
2018-02-04 08:41:03 UTC
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On 04/02/2018 05:30, Tony Cooper wrote:
> The following sentence appeared in an article in _The Washington
> Post_:
>
> "On Saturday, news of Hartnett White’s withdrawal triggered relief
> among some of her staunchest critics."
>
> I'm having trouble with "staunchest" in that context. Using "loyal
> and committed in attitude" as a definition of "staunch", I don't see
> it being used with "critic". "Fiercest critics", maybe, but critics
> don't stand by you; they stand against you.
>
> It's usually supporters of something or someone that are "staunchest".
>
> If you need to know the subject, Trump wanted to appoint Kathleen
> Hartnett White to head the Council on Environmental Quality. Members
> of the scientific community opposed the appointment because of her
> stated positions on the causes of climate change.
>

I see no difficulty. Her staunchest critics are those who are firmly
committed to their point of view, which opposes hers.

--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Lewis
2018-02-04 09:13:43 UTC
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In message <***@4ax.com> Tony Cooper <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> The following sentence appeared in an article in _The Washington
> Post_:

> "On Saturday, news of Hartnett White’s withdrawal triggered relief
> among some of her staunchest critics."

> I'm having trouble with "staunchest" in that context. Using "loyal
> and committed in attitude" as a definition of "staunch", I don't see
> it being used with "critic". "Fiercest critics", maybe, but critics
> don't stand by you; they stand against you.

They are staunch in their criticism, and loyal to it.

--
'Witches just aren't like that,' said Magrat. 'We live in harmony with
the great cycles of Nature, and do no harm to anyone, and it's wicked of
them to say we don't. We ought to fill their bones with hot lead.'
Steve Hayes
2018-02-22 04:27:39 UTC
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On Sun, 04 Feb 2018 00:30:20 -0500, Tony Cooper wrote:

> The following sentence appeared in an article in _The Washington Post_:
>
> "On Saturday, news of Hartnett White’s withdrawal triggered relief
among
> some of her staunchest critics."
>
> I'm having trouble with "staunchest" in that context. Using "loyal and
> committed in attitude" as a definition of "staunch", I don't see it
> being used with "critic". "Fiercest critics", maybe, but critics don't
> stand by you; they stand against you.

Something like Her Majesty's loyal opposition?


--
Steve Hayes http://khanya.wordpress.com
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