Discussion:
literally (cartoon)
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Adam Funk
2017-10-03 07:26:46 UTC
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<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
--
Physics is like sex. Sure, it may give some practical results, but
that's not why we do it. --- Richard Feynman
Peter Young
2017-10-03 08:09:00 UTC
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Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
<grin>

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Pt)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-10-03 09:12:52 UTC
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Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
<grin>
Peter.
+1
Thanks Adam.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Lewis
2017-10-03 17:41:58 UTC
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Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.

I remember being shocked to see BC used as a pro-christian platform on
an Easter Sunday once, and stopped reading both his strips at that
point.
--
'What can I do? I'm only human,' he said aloud. Someone said, Not all
of you. --Pyramids
Horace LaBadie
2017-10-03 19:59:34 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
Perri Hart, John's daughter, and Mick and Mason Mastrioanni, Johnny
Hart's grandsons.
Post by Lewis
I remember being shocked to see BC used as a pro-christian platform on
an Easter Sunday once, and stopped reading both his strips at that
point.
Lewis
2017-10-03 23:00:22 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
Perri Hart, John's daughter, and Mick and Mason Mastrioanni, Johnny
Hart's grandsons.
Ah. Are they continuing the easter tradition of overt and disturbing xian
imagery?
--
Overhead, without any fuss, the stars were going out.
Horace LaBadie
2017-10-03 23:12:43 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
Perri Hart, John's daughter, and Mick and Mason Mastrioanni, Johnny
Hart's grandsons.
Ah. Are they continuing the easter tradition of overt and disturbing xian
imagery?
Judge for yourself.

<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>

By the way, it's not unusual to leave the creator's name on a strip long
after his death. Lee Falk's name is still on The Phantom.
CDB
2017-10-04 13:33:47 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but
that the fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a
decade after his death.
Perri Hart, John's daughter, and Mick and Mason Mastrioanni,
Johnny Hart's grandsons.
Ah. Are they continuing the easter tradition of overt and
disturbing xian imagery?
Judge for yourself.
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I've always found the similarities between Christ and vegetation-gods
quite interesting. Their lives are celebrated each year as if taking
place, when that is only really true of the vegetation gods. They are
buried every year in early Spring and are soon reborn, bringing
sustenance to their cultivators. That's early in Spring for JC, though;
maybe he's an asparagus-god.
Post by Horace LaBadie
By the way, it's not unusual to leave the creator's name on a strip
long after his death. Lee Falk's name is still on The Phantom.
Lewis
2017-10-04 14:05:06 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but
that the fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a
decade after his death.
Perri Hart, John's daughter, and Mick and Mason Mastrioanni,
Johnny Hart's grandsons.
Ah. Are they continuing the easter tradition of overt and
disturbing xian imagery?
Judge for yourself.
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I've always found the similarities between Christ and vegetation-gods
quite interesting. Their lives are celebrated each year as if taking
place, when that is only really true of the vegetation gods. They are
buried every year in early Spring and are soon reborn, bringing
sustenance to their cultivators. That's early in Spring for JC, though;
maybe he's an asparagus-god.
That is why Xianity was able to supplant the pagan religions that were
about sowing and reaping.
--
The older you get the more you need the people you knew when you were
young.
Lewis
2017-10-04 14:03:22 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
Perri Hart, John's daughter, and Mick and Mason Mastrioanni, Johnny
Hart's grandsons.
Ah. Are they continuing the easter tradition of overt and disturbing xian
imagery?
Judge for yourself.
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
That's not nearly as horrible as the bleeding cross.
Post by Horace LaBadie
By the way, it's not unusual to leave the creator's name on a strip long
after his death. Lee Falk's name is still on The Phantom.
Sure, but not as a byline.
--
Hi, I'm Gary Cooper, but not the Gary Cooper that's dead.
Adam Funk
2017-10-05 07:45:05 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
Perri Hart, John's daughter, and Mick and Mason Mastrioanni, Johnny
Hart's grandsons.
Ah. Are they continuing the easter tradition of overt and disturbing xian
imagery?
Judge for yourself.
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I'm not sure what's particularly disturbing about that one (although
IIRC some of the others are of questionable taste), but it always
surprises me that rationalist übermenschen are so delicate that
accidental exposure to religion burns them like vampires in sunlight.
--
Indentation is for enemy skulls, not code!
--- Klingon Programmer's Guide
Lewis
2017-10-05 18:51:40 UTC
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Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
Perri Hart, John's daughter, and Mick and Mason Mastrioanni, Johnny
Hart's grandsons.
Ah. Are they continuing the easter tradition of overt and disturbing xian
imagery?
Judge for yourself.
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I'm not sure what's particularly disturbing about that one (although
IIRC some of the others are of questionable taste), but it always
surprises me that rationalist übermenschen are so delicate that
accidental exposure to religion burns them like vampires in sunlight.
You're being an ass.

Having a comic strip in the newspaper showing a cross on a hill with
blood coming down the hill to a kneeling figure is simply offensive.
Having it in a comic strip that is otherwise about *CAVEMEN* is
insulting. Having this sort of Xian imagery on the comics page is
inappropriate in a secular newspaper.

And, for the record, that strip pissed me off when I was still a
church-goer and long before I was an atheist.
--
He [Carrot] could lead armies, Angua thought. He really could. Some
people have inspired whole countries to great deeds because of the power
of their vision. And so could he. Not because he dreams about marching
hordes, or world domination, or an empire of a thousand years. Just
because he thinks that everyone's really decent underneath and would get
along just fine if only they made an effort, and he believes that
strongly it burns like a flame that is bigger than he is.
Cheryl
2017-10-06 10:31:55 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
Perri Hart, John's daughter, and Mick and Mason Mastrioanni, Johnny
Hart's grandsons.
Ah. Are they continuing the easter tradition of overt and disturbing xian
imagery?
Judge for yourself.
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I'm not sure what's particularly disturbing about that one (although
IIRC some of the others are of questionable taste), but it always
surprises me that rationalist übermenschen are so delicate that
accidental exposure to religion burns them like vampires in sunlight.
You're being an ass.
Having a comic strip in the newspaper showing a cross on a hill with
blood coming down the hill to a kneeling figure is simply offensive.
Having it in a comic strip that is otherwise about *CAVEMEN* is
insulting. Having this sort of Xian imagery on the comics page is
inappropriate in a secular newspaper.
And, for the record, that strip pissed me off when I was still a
church-goer and long before I was an atheist.
The world's full of offensive imagery (and text!), or perhaps I should
say imagery and text someone is bound to find offensive, and your
initial reaction - to stop reading it - is pretty much exactly what I
usually do when I encounter something offensive.

I don't agree with you that a secular newspaper should avoid religious
imagery. I think they should (and probably do) publish whatever imagery
they think most of their readers want to see, just as secular art
galleries display religious imagery ranging from the inspiring to the
obscene.
--
Cheryl
J. J. Lodder
2017-10-06 11:56:18 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but
that the fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a
decade after his death.
Perri Hart, John's daughter, and Mick and Mason Mastrioanni, Johnny
Hart's grandsons.
Ah. Are they continuing the easter tradition of overt and disturbing xian
imagery?
Judge for yourself.
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I'm not sure what's particularly disturbing about that one (although
IIRC some of the others are of questionable taste), but it always
surprises me that rationalist übermenschen are so delicate that
accidental exposure to religion burns them like vampires in sunlight.
You're being an ass.
Having a comic strip in the newspaper showing a cross on a hill with
blood coming down the hill to a kneeling figure is simply offensive.
Having it in a comic strip that is otherwise about *CAVEMEN* is
insulting. Having this sort of Xian imagery on the comics page is
inappropriate in a secular newspaper.
And, for the record, that strip pissed me off when I was still a
church-goer and long before I was an atheist.
The world's full of offensive imagery (and text!), or perhaps I should
say imagery and text someone is bound to find offensive, and your
initial reaction - to stop reading it - is pretty much exactly what I
usually do when I encounter something offensive.
I don't agree with you that a secular newspaper should avoid religious
imagery. I think they should (and probably do) publish whatever imagery
they think most of their readers want to see, just as secular art
galleries display religious imagery ranging from the inspiring to the
obscene.
A good newspaper should protect writers against themselves,
and their public against the outpourings of nutters.

When an author (like Johnny Hart) becomes a reli-nutter
redactional policy should be to drop him as a contributor.

But maybe I am expecting too much,

Jan
Cheryl
2017-10-06 12:04:55 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but
that the fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a
decade after his death.
Perri Hart, John's daughter, and Mick and Mason Mastrioanni, Johnny
Hart's grandsons.
Ah. Are they continuing the easter tradition of overt and disturbing xian
imagery?
Judge for yourself.
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I'm not sure what's particularly disturbing about that one (although
IIRC some of the others are of questionable taste), but it always
surprises me that rationalist übermenschen are so delicate that
accidental exposure to religion burns them like vampires in sunlight.
You're being an ass.
Having a comic strip in the newspaper showing a cross on a hill with
blood coming down the hill to a kneeling figure is simply offensive.
Having it in a comic strip that is otherwise about *CAVEMEN* is
insulting. Having this sort of Xian imagery on the comics page is
inappropriate in a secular newspaper.
And, for the record, that strip pissed me off when I was still a
church-goer and long before I was an atheist.
The world's full of offensive imagery (and text!), or perhaps I should
say imagery and text someone is bound to find offensive, and your
initial reaction - to stop reading it - is pretty much exactly what I
usually do when I encounter something offensive.
I don't agree with you that a secular newspaper should avoid religious
imagery. I think they should (and probably do) publish whatever imagery
they think most of their readers want to see, just as secular art
galleries display religious imagery ranging from the inspiring to the
obscene.
A good newspaper should protect writers against themselves,
and their public against the outpourings of nutters.
When an author (like Johnny Hart) becomes a reli-nutter
redactional policy should be to drop him as a contributor.
But maybe I am expecting too much,
I hope so. My expectations of newspapers, should I ever read one again
(as opposed to their online sites), wouldn't include their ability to
protect either me from their writer's opinions or their writers from
themselves.
--
Cheryl
J. J. Lodder
2017-10-06 19:36:57 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but
that the fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a
decade after his death.
Perri Hart, John's daughter, and Mick and Mason Mastrioanni, Johnny
Hart's grandsons.
Ah. Are they continuing the easter tradition of overt and
disturbing xian imagery?
Judge for yourself.
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I'm not sure what's particularly disturbing about that one (although
IIRC some of the others are of questionable taste), but it always
surprises me that rationalist übermenschen are so delicate that
accidental exposure to religion burns them like vampires in sunlight.
You're being an ass.
Having a comic strip in the newspaper showing a cross on a hill with
blood coming down the hill to a kneeling figure is simply offensive.
Having it in a comic strip that is otherwise about *CAVEMEN* is
insulting. Having this sort of Xian imagery on the comics page is
inappropriate in a secular newspaper.
And, for the record, that strip pissed me off when I was still a
church-goer and long before I was an atheist.
The world's full of offensive imagery (and text!), or perhaps I should
say imagery and text someone is bound to find offensive, and your
initial reaction - to stop reading it - is pretty much exactly what I
usually do when I encounter something offensive.
I don't agree with you that a secular newspaper should avoid religious
imagery. I think they should (and probably do) publish whatever imagery
they think most of their readers want to see, just as secular art
galleries display religious imagery ranging from the inspiring to the
obscene.
A good newspaper should protect writers against themselves,
and their public against the outpourings of nutters.
When an author (like Johnny Hart) becomes a reli-nutter
redactional policy should be to drop him as a contributor.
But maybe I am expecting too much,
I hope so. My expectations of newspapers, should I ever read one again
(as opposed to their online sites), wouldn't include their ability to
protect either me from their writer's opinions or their writers from
themselves.
I pay for, and expect, a quality newspaper.
That of course means quality content.
Perhaps the phenomenon is unknown in your part of the world?

Jan

PS I looked it up, BC, translated to 'Oerm'
did appear in a Dutch newspaper on a daily basis.
(The AD, not a quality newspaper)
They dropped it a long time ago,
perhaps 30 years, don't know why.
Wizard of Id, idem.
David Kleinecke
2017-10-06 20:46:16 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but
that the fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a
decade after his death.
Perri Hart, John's daughter, and Mick and Mason Mastrioanni, Johnny
Hart's grandsons.
Ah. Are they continuing the easter tradition of overt and
disturbing xian imagery?
Judge for yourself.
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I'm not sure what's particularly disturbing about that one (although
IIRC some of the others are of questionable taste), but it always
surprises me that rationalist übermenschen are so delicate that
accidental exposure to religion burns them like vampires in sunlight.
You're being an ass.
Having a comic strip in the newspaper showing a cross on a hill with
blood coming down the hill to a kneeling figure is simply offensive.
Having it in a comic strip that is otherwise about *CAVEMEN* is
insulting. Having this sort of Xian imagery on the comics page is
inappropriate in a secular newspaper.
And, for the record, that strip pissed me off when I was still a
church-goer and long before I was an atheist.
The world's full of offensive imagery (and text!), or perhaps I should
say imagery and text someone is bound to find offensive, and your
initial reaction - to stop reading it - is pretty much exactly what I
usually do when I encounter something offensive.
I don't agree with you that a secular newspaper should avoid religious
imagery. I think they should (and probably do) publish whatever imagery
they think most of their readers want to see, just as secular art
galleries display religious imagery ranging from the inspiring to the
obscene.
A good newspaper should protect writers against themselves,
and their public against the outpourings of nutters.
When an author (like Johnny Hart) becomes a reli-nutter
redactional policy should be to drop him as a contributor.
But maybe I am expecting too much,
I hope so. My expectations of newspapers, should I ever read one again
(as opposed to their online sites), wouldn't include their ability to
protect either me from their writer's opinions or their writers from
themselves.
I pay for, and expect, a quality newspaper.
That of course means quality content.
Perhaps the phenomenon is unknown in your part of the world?
Jan
PS I looked it up, BC, translated to 'Oerm'
did appear in a Dutch newspaper on a daily basis.
(The AD, not a quality newspaper)
They dropped it a long time ago,
perhaps 30 years, don't know why.
Wizard of Id, idem.
I, for one, wouldn't know "quality content" if it
bit me. I stopped reading newspapers long ago. I get my
local news from from local websites and the big
picture from, primarily, Google News - supplemented by
Huffpost (now so degenerate I am thinking of dropping
it) and Wonkette (surprisingly good if one can tolerate
snark but, I fear, unstable). My favorite local news
site gets all the way down to lost dogs and cats but
carries few ads.
Tony Cooper
2017-10-06 21:52:11 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
I don't agree with you that a secular newspaper should avoid religious
imagery. I think they should (and probably do) publish whatever imagery
they think most of their readers want to see, just as secular art
galleries display religious imagery ranging from the inspiring to the
obscene.
A good newspaper should protect writers against themselves,
and their public against the outpourings of nutters.
When an author (like Johnny Hart) becomes a reli-nutter
redactional policy should be to drop him as a contributor.
But maybe I am expecting too much,
I hope so. My expectations of newspapers, should I ever read one again
(as opposed to their online sites), wouldn't include their ability to
protect either me from their writer's opinions or their writers from
themselves.
I pay for, and expect, a quality newspaper.
That of course means quality content.
Perhaps the phenomenon is unknown in your part of the world?
Most US newspapers contain new articles and opinion articles. There
is no expectation by the publisher or the reader for the opinion
articles to have any standard of the type of quality involved in
regard to the publisher's or the reader's agreement with the position.

The _Orlando Sentinel_ usually runs opposing opinion articles by
columnists or readers. If they run an opinion article that takes a
pro-(subject) stance, they will run it side-by-side with an opinion
article with an opposite stance. It's up to the reader to decide
which represents quality.

I would not be opposed to the _Orlando Sentinel_ publishing an opinion
piece espousing a religious view that I oppose and personally feel
does not include factual quality as long as they also give voice to an
opposing article.

This is timely. Trump's administration is taking steps to allow
employers with "moral or religious" objections to providing
contraception as part of health insurance. I expect to see opinion
pieces in the _Orlando Sentinel_ agreeing or disagreeing with this.

What you seem to want is your newspaper making the decision for you as
to what is "quality" and acceptable. I want to make that decision
myself.

To tie this in with comics in the newspaper, the _Orlando Sentinel_
carries both "Doonesbury" and "Mallard Fillmore" on the comic page
with "Doonesbury" labeled as "From the Left" and "Mallard Fillmore"
labeled "From the Right".

"Mallard Fillmore" is a snarky right-wing strip that lacks - IMO -
quality. But, I think it's entirely appropriate to offer this for
people who want snarky right-wing idiocy.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Rich Ulrich
2017-10-06 23:09:13 UTC
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On Fri, 06 Oct 2017 17:52:11 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
To tie this in with comics in the newspaper, the _Orlando Sentinel_
carries both "Doonesbury" and "Mallard Fillmore" on the comic page
with "Doonesbury" labeled as "From the Left" and "Mallard Fillmore"
labeled "From the Right".
I remember a bit of flap that resulted in Doonesbury being
relocated, by many newspapers, away from the other strips -
often on the editiorial page. That was probably while Trudeau
was very explicit about Watergate.


("Well, John, how's the cover-up going?")
http://doonesbury.washingtonpost.com/strip/archive/1973/09/17

A few publishers dropped the strip entirely, but if "Doonesbury"
wasn't the most popular strip that they carried, it was close to it.
--
Rich Ulrich
Horace LaBadie
2017-10-06 23:33:57 UTC
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Post by Rich Ulrich
On Fri, 06 Oct 2017 17:52:11 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
To tie this in with comics in the newspaper, the _Orlando Sentinel_
carries both "Doonesbury" and "Mallard Fillmore" on the comic page
with "Doonesbury" labeled as "From the Left" and "Mallard Fillmore"
labeled "From the Right".
I remember a bit of flap that resulted in Doonesbury being
relocated, by many newspapers, away from the other strips -
often on the editiorial page. That was probably while Trudeau
was very explicit about Watergate.
("Well, John, how's the cover-up going?")
http://doonesbury.washingtonpost.com/strip/archive/1973/09/17
A few publishers dropped the strip entirely, but if "Doonesbury"
wasn't the most popular strip that they carried, it was close to it.
Sadly reduced to new Sundays for a couple of years now, as Trudeau
produces a TV show, Alpha House, on Amazon.
Rich Ulrich
2017-10-07 06:37:20 UTC
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On Fri, 06 Oct 2017 19:33:57 -0400, Horace LaBadie
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Fri, 06 Oct 2017 17:52:11 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
To tie this in with comics in the newspaper, the _Orlando Sentinel_
carries both "Doonesbury" and "Mallard Fillmore" on the comic page
with "Doonesbury" labeled as "From the Left" and "Mallard Fillmore"
labeled "From the Right".
I remember a bit of flap that resulted in Doonesbury being
relocated, by many newspapers, away from the other strips -
often on the editiorial page. That was probably while Trudeau
was very explicit about Watergate.
("Well, John, how's the cover-up going?")
http://doonesbury.washingtonpost.com/strip/archive/1973/09/17
A few publishers dropped the strip entirely, but if "Doonesbury"
wasn't the most popular strip that they carried, it was close to it.
Sadly reduced to new Sundays for a couple of years now, as Trudeau
produces a TV show, Alpha House, on Amazon.
I see the new Sunday strip locally.

The Pittsburgh Post Gazette backed up by 20 or 30 years to
keep the daily strip going. (Recently: crazy-guy Trump hires
Duke to fetch Honey from China where she got labeled an
counter-revolutionary... or something like that.)

I hoped that their keeping the daily strip meant that eventually
new stuff will return.

On the other hand, they still are re-running Charlie Brown/Peanuts.
Wiki -
Charlie Brown made his final comic strip appearance on the final
original Peanuts strip, which was published on February 13,
2000--the day after Schultz' death.
--
Rich Ulrich
Tak To
2017-10-07 19:10:20 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Fri, 06 Oct 2017 17:52:11 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
To tie this in with comics in the newspaper, the _Orlando Sentinel_
carries both "Doonesbury" and "Mallard Fillmore" on the comic page
with "Doonesbury" labeled as "From the Left" and "Mallard Fillmore"
labeled "From the Right".
I remember a bit of flap that resulted in Doonesbury being
relocated, by many newspapers, away from the other strips -
often on the editiorial page. That was probably while Trudeau
was very explicit about Watergate.
("Well, John, how's the cover-up going?")
http://doonesbury.washingtonpost.com/strip/archive/1973/09/17
A few publishers dropped the strip entirely, but if "Doonesbury"
wasn't the most popular strip that they carried, it was close to it.
Sadly reduced to new Sundays for a couple of years now, as Trudeau
produces a TV show, Alpha House, on Amazon.
My opinion of Trudeau dropped considerably when he introduced the
"Honey" character, not that I was enthusiastic with "Duke" in the
first place. And when he went into hiatus and /Bloom County/ and
Opus came along -- who needed him anymore?

I once read a comment about Trudeau that I thought was right on
the money -- that he tried too hard to be the voice of his
generation. It echoes a comment made by Kurt Vonnegut Jr in
an interview in the 80's when /Galápagos/ came out. He complained
that contemporary authors acted as if "all the important questions
have been answered". The fact is that the time of GT and KV
has come and gone, but both authors acted as if it were still
the early 70's.

While Mike was the main character, Trudeau's heart has always been
with Zonker.
--
Tak
----------------------------------------------------------------+-----
Tak To ***@alum.mit.eduxx
--------------------------------------------------------------------^^
[taode takto ~{LU5B~}] NB: trim the xx to get my real email addr
Tony Cooper
2017-10-07 00:06:42 UTC
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On Fri, 06 Oct 2017 19:09:13 -0400, Rich Ulrich
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Fri, 06 Oct 2017 17:52:11 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
To tie this in with comics in the newspaper, the _Orlando Sentinel_
carries both "Doonesbury" and "Mallard Fillmore" on the comic page
with "Doonesbury" labeled as "From the Left" and "Mallard Fillmore"
labeled "From the Right".
I remember a bit of flap that resulted in Doonesbury being
relocated, by many newspapers, away from the other strips -
often on the editiorial page. That was probably while Trudeau
was very explicit about Watergate.
The _Orlando Sentinel_ compromised. The back page of the "Local &
State" section is all comic strips. They relocated "Doonesbury" to
the inside back page where it, and "Mallard Fillmore" are the only two
strips.

Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword, Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
b***@shaw.ca
2017-10-07 03:39:51 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword, Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
Are you sure it was Goren? He's been dead since 1991. After he died, Omar Sharif took over the bridge column and after his death, Tannah Hirsch. I'm not sure who writes it now, but I'd be surprised if Goren's name was on it.
Tony Cooper
2017-10-07 13:08:50 UTC
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Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Tony Cooper
Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword, Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
Are you sure it was Goren? He's been dead since 1991. After he died, Omar Sharif took over the bridge column and after his death, Tannah Hirsch. I'm not sure who writes it now, but I'd be surprised if Goren's name was on it.
Really? Do you think I'd look at a page of my newspaper and list what
appears on the page and substitute "Goren" for some other name?

The column is titled "Goren on Bridge". It also says "With Bob Jones"
in smaller print. Another ambiguity to deal with. Is his first name
"With"?

Jones can't have written the column "with" Goren unless the two worked
together in much earlier times and the columns are from then.

But, the column is - as I said - headed "Goren on Bridge".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mark Brader
2017-10-08 04:35:38 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword, Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
The column is titled "Goren on Bridge". It also says "With Bob Jones"
in smaller print. Another ambiguity to deal with. Is his first name
"With"?
Jones can't have written the column "with" Goren unless the two worked
together in much earlier times and the columns are from then.
But, the column is - as I said - headed "Goren on Bridge".
Huh, so it is.

http://www.pressreader.com/usa/orlando-sentinel/20170927/281891593467874

The note at the end appears to make it clear that Jones is involved
with the column currently, so Goren's name must be being used in the
same manner as "Webster" on some dictionaries not connected to Webster,
and "Hoyle" on some books of rules of card games.

(By way of additional supporting evidence, note the meaning of the 2NT
bid. For all I know Jacoby may well have invented this while Goren
was still alive and active, but I don't believe it was in sufficiently
common use that a columnist would just give it a one-line footnote.)
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "But I do't have a '' key o my termial."
***@vex.net -- Lynn Gold

My text in this article is in the public domain.
b***@shaw.ca
2017-10-08 07:35:12 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword, Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
The column is titled "Goren on Bridge". It also says "With Bob Jones"
in smaller print. Another ambiguity to deal with. Is his first name
"With"?
Jones can't have written the column "with" Goren unless the two worked
together in much earlier times and the columns are from then.
But, the column is - as I said - headed "Goren on Bridge".
Huh, so it is.
I'm also surprised, but I suppose the name "Goren" on the column lends it an authority greater than that provided by the current writer's name.
Horace LaBadie
2017-10-08 12:38:53 UTC
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Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword, Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
The column is titled "Goren on Bridge". It also says "With Bob Jones"
in smaller print. Another ambiguity to deal with. Is his first name
"With"?
Jones can't have written the column "with" Goren unless the two worked
together in much earlier times and the columns are from then.
But, the column is - as I said - headed "Goren on Bridge".
Huh, so it is.
I'm also surprised, but I suppose the name "Goren" on the column lends it an
authority greater than that provided by the current writer's name.
Dear Abby continues, despite that Pauline Phillips (aka Abigail van
Buren) stopped writing the feature in 2000, and died four years ago.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-08 12:59:03 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword, Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
The column is titled "Goren on Bridge". It also says "With Bob Jones"
in smaller print. Another ambiguity to deal with. Is his first name
"With"?
Jones can't have written the column "with" Goren unless the two worked
together in much earlier times and the columns are from then.
But, the column is - as I said - headed "Goren on Bridge".
Huh, so it is.
I'm also surprised, but I suppose the name "Goren" on the column lends it an
authority greater than that provided by the current writer's name.
Dear Abby continues, despite that Pauline Phillips (aka Abigail van
Buren) stopped writing the feature in 2000, and died four years ago.
"Abby," though, wasn't an actual person (nor was "Ann Landers," originally
written by the twin sister of the original writer of "Dear Abby" -- their
home bases were two rival Chicago daily newspapers), whereas Mr. Goren was one.
Horace LaBadie
2017-10-08 17:48:21 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword, Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
The column is titled "Goren on Bridge". It also says "With Bob Jones"
in smaller print. Another ambiguity to deal with. Is his first name
"With"?
Jones can't have written the column "with" Goren unless the two worked
together in much earlier times and the columns are from then.
But, the column is - as I said - headed "Goren on Bridge".
Huh, so it is.
I'm also surprised, but I suppose the name "Goren" on the column lends it an
authority greater than that provided by the current writer's name.
Dear Abby continues, despite that Pauline Phillips (aka Abigail van
Buren) stopped writing the feature in 2000, and died four years ago.
"Abby," though, wasn't an actual person (nor was "Ann Landers," originally
written by the twin sister of the original writer of "Dear Abby" -- their
home bases were two rival Chicago daily newspapers), whereas Mr. Goren was one.
Is "Kirk Douglas" a real person? Is "John Le Carre" a real person?
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-08 17:55:04 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword,
Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
The column is titled "Goren on Bridge". It also says "With Bob Jones"
in smaller print. Another ambiguity to deal with. Is his first name
"With"?
Jones can't have written the column "with" Goren unless the two worked
together in much earlier times and the columns are from then.
But, the column is - as I said - headed "Goren on Bridge".
Huh, so it is.
I'm also surprised, but I suppose the name "Goren" on the column lends it an
authority greater than that provided by the current writer's name.
Dear Abby continues, despite that Pauline Phillips (aka Abigail van
Buren) stopped writing the feature in 2000, and died four years ago.
"Abby," though, wasn't an actual person (nor was "Ann Landers," originally
written by the twin sister of the original writer of "Dear Abby" -- their
home bases were two rival Chicago daily newspapers), whereas Mr. Goren was one.
Is "Kirk Douglas" a real person? Is "John Le Carre" a real person?
When Mr. Douglas retired from the screen, no one began an acting career using
his name, likeness, or persona. Mr. Le Carré hasn't stopped writing fiction
under that name, so the question in both cases is moot.

I forgot to add earlier, see Nathanael West's *Miss Lonelyhearts*.
Horace LaBadie
2017-10-08 18:24:13 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword,
Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
The column is titled "Goren on Bridge". It also says "With Bob
Jones"
in smaller print. Another ambiguity to deal with. Is his first
name
"With"?
Jones can't have written the column "with" Goren unless the two
worked
together in much earlier times and the columns are from then.
But, the column is - as I said - headed "Goren on Bridge".
Huh, so it is.
I'm also surprised, but I suppose the name "Goren" on the column
lends it
an
authority greater than that provided by the current writer's name.
Dear Abby continues, despite that Pauline Phillips (aka Abigail van
Buren) stopped writing the feature in 2000, and died four years ago.
"Abby," though, wasn't an actual person (nor was "Ann Landers," originally
written by the twin sister of the original writer of "Dear Abby" -- their
home bases were two rival Chicago daily newspapers), whereas Mr. Goren
was
one.
Is "Kirk Douglas" a real person? Is "John Le Carre" a real person?
When Mr. Douglas retired from the screen, no one began an acting career using
his name, likeness, or persona. Mr. Le Carré hasn't stopped writing fiction
under that name, so the question in both cases is moot.
You said "Abby" "wasn't" a real person. Yet Abigail Van Buren made a lot
of public appearances. The fact that there is another "Abby" today is
hardly any refutation that "Abby" is a real person.

(Laurence Olivier was dead at the time Sky Captain and the World of
Tomorrow was made, but a CGI version assumed his likeness and persona. I
assume that Lord Larry was real in the past, despite that impersonation.)
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I forgot to add earlier, see Nathanael West's *Miss Lonelyhearts*.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-08 20:43:44 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword,
Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
The column is titled "Goren on Bridge". It also says "With Bob
Jones"
in smaller print. Another ambiguity to deal with. Is his first
name
"With"?
Jones can't have written the column "with" Goren unless the two
worked
together in much earlier times and the columns are from then.
But, the column is - as I said - headed "Goren on Bridge".
Huh, so it is.
I'm also surprised, but I suppose the name "Goren" on the column
lends it
an
authority greater than that provided by the current writer's name.
Dear Abby continues, despite that Pauline Phillips (aka Abigail van
Buren) stopped writing the feature in 2000, and died four years ago.
"Abby," though, wasn't an actual person (nor was "Ann Landers," originally
written by the twin sister of the original writer of "Dear Abby" -- their
home bases were two rival Chicago daily newspapers), whereas Mr. Goren
was
one.
Is "Kirk Douglas" a real person? Is "John Le Carre" a real person?
When Mr. Douglas retired from the screen, no one began an acting career using
his name, likeness, or persona. Mr. Le Carré hasn't stopped writing fiction
under that name, so the question in both cases is moot.
You said "Abby" "wasn't" a real person. Yet Abigail Van Buren made a lot
of public appearances.
Who played her? Miss Phillips, or a host of actresses?
Post by Horace LaBadie
The fact that there is another "Abby" today is
hardly any refutation that "Abby" is a real person.
(Laurence Olivier was dead at the time Sky Captain and the World of
Tomorrow was made, but a CGI version assumed his likeness and persona. I
assume that Lord Larry was real in the past, despite that impersonation.)
The characters he played, however, were not "real persons." (Historical fiction like *Richard III*
is a different kettle of fish.)
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
I forgot to add earlier, see Nathanael West's *Miss Lonelyhearts*.
Paul Wolff
2017-10-09 09:10:53 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Is "Kirk Douglas" a real person? Is "John Le Carre" a real person?
When Mr. Douglas retired from the screen, no one began an acting career using
his name, likeness, or persona. Mr. Le Carré hasn't stopped writing fiction
under that name, so the question in both cases is moot.
You said "Abby" "wasn't" a real person. Yet Abigail Van Buren made a lot
of public appearances.
Who played her? Miss Phillips, or a host of actresses?
Post by Horace LaBadie
The fact that there is another "Abby" today is
hardly any refutation that "Abby" is a real person.
(Laurence Olivier was dead at the time Sky Captain and the World of
Tomorrow was made, but a CGI version assumed his likeness and persona. I
assume that Lord Larry was real in the past, despite that impersonation.)
The characters he played, however, were not "real persons." (Historical
fiction like *Richard III*
is a different kettle of fish.)
Traditionally, the phrase is "a horse of a different colour"[1]. "A
pretty kettle of fish" is a mare's nest.

[1] But in the case of Richard III, a horse of unspecified colour.
--
Paul
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-09 12:43:26 UTC
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Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
(Laurence Olivier was dead at the time Sky Captain and the World of
Tomorrow was made, but a CGI version assumed his likeness and persona. I
assume that Lord Larry was real in the past, despite that impersonation.)
The characters he played, however, were not "real persons." (Historical
fiction like *Richard III*
is a different kettle of fish.)
Traditionally, the phrase is "a horse of a different colour"[1]. "A
pretty kettle of fish" is a mare's nest.
[1] But in the case of Richard III, a horse of unspecified colour.
I didn't say "a pretty kettle of fish." I said "a different kettle of fish."

Mr Gilbert wrote "Here's a pretty how-de-doo."

"Horse of a different color" was pretty much skunked by the movie *The Wizard of Oz* (1939).
Is it clear in the book that the horse was green because of green filters on eyewear?
Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2017-10-08 23:26:04 UTC
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Horace LaBadie wrote something (snipped):
ObAUE-1: Nathanael West was a New York Jew born
Nathan (Wallenstein) Weinstein.

ObAUE-2: To the best of my knowledge, he was not related to Harvey
Weinstein, that utterly vulgar and repulsive-looking swine I call "Weinschwein."

ObAUE-3: Radio and TV reporters I've heard pronounce Harvey Weinstein's
last name as "Wine-steen," not "Wine-stine," as that German-Jewish name
meaning "wine-stone" ought to be pronounced.

Carry on.
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
Ken Blake
2017-10-08 23:34:05 UTC
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On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 16:26:04 -0700, Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
ObAUE-3: Radio and TV reporters I've heard pronounce Harvey Weinstein's
last name as "Wine-steen," not "Wine-stine," as that German-Jewish name
meaning "wine-stone" ought to be pronounced.
Interesting that that's mispronounced, but "Einstein" never is.
musika
2017-10-09 00:33:26 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 16:26:04 -0700, Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
ObAUE-3: Radio and TV reporters I've heard pronounce Harvey Weinstein's
last name as "Wine-steen," not "Wine-stine," as that German-Jewish name
meaning "wine-stone" ought to be pronounced.
Interesting that that's mispronounced, but "Einstein" never is.
Then there's Leonard Bernstein (stine) and Elmer Bernstein (steen).
--
Ray
UK
Mack A. Damia
2017-10-09 00:36:18 UTC
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Post by musika
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 16:26:04 -0700, Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
ObAUE-3: Radio and TV reporters I've heard pronounce Harvey Weinstein's
last name as "Wine-steen," not "Wine-stine," as that German-Jewish name
meaning "wine-stone" ought to be pronounced.
Interesting that that's mispronounced, but "Einstein" never is.
Then there's Leonard Bernstein (stine) and Elmer Bernstein (steen).
There's a Frankenstein (stine) and Frankenstein (shteen).

Also, Igor (E-gor) and Igor (Eye-gor)
Paul Wolff
2017-10-09 09:15:42 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by musika
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 16:26:04 -0700, Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
ObAUE-3: Radio and TV reporters I've heard pronounce Harvey Weinstein's
last name as "Wine-steen," not "Wine-stine," as that German-Jewish name
meaning "wine-stone" ought to be pronounced.
Interesting that that's mispronounced, but "Einstein" never is.
Then there's Leonard Bernstein (stine) and Elmer Bernstein (steen).
There's a Frankenstein (stine) and Frankenstein (shteen).
Scots called Stein are always called "steen", except exceptions. That
may confuse some people.
--
Paul
Mack A. Damia
2017-10-09 15:10:03 UTC
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On Mon, 9 Oct 2017 10:15:42 +0100, Paul Wolff
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by musika
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 16:26:04 -0700, Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
ObAUE-3: Radio and TV reporters I've heard pronounce Harvey Weinstein's
last name as "Wine-steen," not "Wine-stine," as that German-Jewish name
meaning "wine-stone" ought to be pronounced.
Interesting that that's mispronounced, but "Einstein" never is.
Then there's Leonard Bernstein (stine) and Elmer Bernstein (steen).
There's a Frankenstein (stine) and Frankenstein (shteen).
Scots called Stein are always called "steen", except exceptions. That
may confuse some people.
http://www.ladyofthecake.com/mel/frank/sounds/joking.wav
Adam Funk
2017-10-10 15:51:38 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by musika
Then there's Leonard Bernstein (stine) and Elmer Bernstein (steen).
There's a Frankenstein (stine) and Frankenstein (shteen).
Also, Igor (E-gor) and Igor (Eye-gor)
Then there's the brain of Abby Normal...
--
With the breakdown of the medieval system, the gods of chaos, lunacy,
and bad taste gained ascendancy. --- Ignatius J Reilly
Mack A. Damia
2017-10-10 16:23:12 UTC
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Post by Adam Funk
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by musika
Then there's Leonard Bernstein (stine) and Elmer Bernstein (steen).
There's a Frankenstein (stine) and Frankenstein (shteen).
Also, Igor (E-gor) and Igor (Eye-gor)
Then there's the brain of Abby Normal...
Janet got it.
Quinn C
2017-10-13 19:09:57 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 16:26:04 -0700, Reinhold {Rey} Aman
Post by Reinhold {Rey} Aman
ObAUE-3: Radio and TV reporters I've heard pronounce Harvey Weinstein's
last name as "Wine-steen," not "Wine-stine," as that German-Jewish name
meaning "wine-stone" ought to be pronounced.
And the usual meaning of "Weinstein" is the otherthreadly cream of
tartar.
--
Woman is a pair of ovaries with a human being attached, whereas
man is a human being furnished with a pair of testes.
-- Rudolf Virchow
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-10-08 13:06:10 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword, Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
The column is titled "Goren on Bridge". It also says "With Bob Jones"
in smaller print. Another ambiguity to deal with. Is his first name
"With"?
Jones can't have written the column "with" Goren unless the two worked
together in much earlier times and the columns are from then.
But, the column is - as I said - headed "Goren on Bridge".
Huh, so it is.
I'm also surprised, but I suppose the name "Goren" on the column lends it an
authority greater than that provided by the current writer's name.
Dear Abby continues, despite that Pauline Phillips (aka Abigail van
Buren) stopped writing the feature in 2000, and died four years ago.
I assume the point is that "Goren" and "Dear Abby" are like brand names
and the names of business which continue in use even though the person
in the name is no longer involved.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Lewis
2017-10-08 15:32:33 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword, Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
The column is titled "Goren on Bridge". It also says "With Bob Jones"
in smaller print. Another ambiguity to deal with. Is his first name
"With"?
Jones can't have written the column "with" Goren unless the two worked
together in much earlier times and the columns are from then.
But, the column is - as I said - headed "Goren on Bridge".
Huh, so it is.
I'm also surprised, but I suppose the name "Goren" on the column lends it an
authority greater than that provided by the current writer's name.
Dear Abby continues, despite that Pauline Phillips (aka Abigail van
Buren) stopped writing the feature in 2000, and died four years ago.
2002, and the column then went to her daughter who I presume is still
doing it now.

Her sister, of course, was "Ann Landers".
--
It was intended that when Newspeak had been adopted once and for all and
Oldspeak forgotten, a heretical thought...should be literally
unthinkable, at least so far as thought is dependent on words.
Tony Cooper
2017-10-08 13:04:05 UTC
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Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword, Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
The column is titled "Goren on Bridge". It also says "With Bob Jones"
in smaller print. Another ambiguity to deal with. Is his first name
"With"?
Jones can't have written the column "with" Goren unless the two worked
together in much earlier times and the columns are from then.
But, the column is - as I said - headed "Goren on Bridge".
Huh, so it is.
I'm also surprised, but I suppose the name "Goren" on the column lends it an authority greater than that provided by the current writer's name.
It would throw you off completely if there was an adjacent column on
other card games with Hoyle in the title.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Tony Cooper
2017-10-08 13:01:12 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword, Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
The column is titled "Goren on Bridge". It also says "With Bob Jones"
in smaller print. Another ambiguity to deal with. Is his first name
"With"?
Jones can't have written the column "with" Goren unless the two worked
together in much earlier times and the columns are from then.
But, the column is - as I said - headed "Goren on Bridge".
Huh, so it is.
http://www.pressreader.com/usa/orlando-sentinel/20170927/281891593467874
I am somewhat miffed. You doubted me and felt it was necessary to
fact-check me?

I don't make things up. I would rather walk barefoot across a fiery
Jersey City landfill than prevaricate.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-08 13:18:23 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Also on that inside back page is Jumble, Sudoku, the Crossword, Goren
on Bridge, Ask Amy, Horoscopes, and Today in History.
The column is titled "Goren on Bridge". It also says "With Bob Jones"
in smaller print. Another ambiguity to deal with. Is his first name
"With"?
Jones can't have written the column "with" Goren unless the two worked
together in much earlier times and the columns are from then.
But, the column is - as I said - headed "Goren on Bridge".
Huh, so it is.
http://www.pressreader.com/usa/orlando-sentinel/20170927/281891593467874
I am somewhat miffed. You doubted me and felt it was necessary to
fact-check me?
I don't make things up.
Splork!
Post by Tony Cooper
I would rather walk barefoot across a fiery
Jersey City landfill than prevaricate.
QED.
Mark Brader
2017-10-08 21:29:50 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
I am somewhat miffed. You doubted me and felt it was necessary to
fact-check me?
No, I just wanted to see what additional information I could find out.
--
Mark Brader | "A colorful quilt reflecting the dispersed development
***@vex.net | of the nation. A sentence fragment."
Toronto | --Eric Walker
Mark Brader
2017-10-07 00:29:29 UTC
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Post by Rich Ulrich
I remember a bit of flap that resulted in Doonesbury being
relocated, by many newspapers, away from the other strips -
often on the editiorial page. That was probably while Trudeau
was very explicit about Watergate.
I seem to recall hearing that this was because Garry Trudeau had
secured protection for the *size* that Doonesbury was printed at.
When papers shrank the other strips on their comics pages, it didn't
fit there any more.
--
Mark Brader | "If one were to believe the bulk of our mail, one
Toronto | would conclude that about every part of our anatomy
***@vex.net | (even those we don't possess) is the wrong size..." --LWN

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Lewis
2017-10-07 02:23:35 UTC
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Post by Rich Ulrich
On Fri, 06 Oct 2017 17:52:11 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
To tie this in with comics in the newspaper, the _Orlando Sentinel_
carries both "Doonesbury" and "Mallard Fillmore" on the comic page
with "Doonesbury" labeled as "From the Left" and "Mallard Fillmore"
labeled "From the Right".
I remember a bit of flap that resulted in Doonesbury being
relocated, by many newspapers, away from the other strips -
often on the editiorial page. That was probably while Trudeau
was very explicit about Watergate.
No, I remember it being much later than that. Mostly during Bush the
Lesser, though some newspapers moved it for awhile during Reagan's
years, I think around the Iran-Contra "investigation".
--
It was a fifty-four with a mashed up door and a cheesy little amp with a
sign on the front said "Fender Champ" and a second-hand guitar it was a
Stratocaster with a whammy bar
Joy Beeson
2017-10-07 02:23:54 UTC
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On Fri, 06 Oct 2017 19:09:13 -0400, Rich Ulrich
. . . if "Doonesbury"
wasn't the most popular strip that they carried, it was close to it.
For a while, we subscribed to an out-of-town paper for the sole
purpose of reading Doonesbury.

Nowadays, I won't even bother to get my reading glasses out of the arm
of the chair I'm sitting in.
--
Joy Beeson
joy beeson at comcast dot net
http://wlweather.net/PAGEJOY/
David Kleinecke
2017-10-07 04:02:25 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
I don't agree with you that a secular newspaper should avoid religious
imagery. I think they should (and probably do) publish whatever imagery
they think most of their readers want to see, just as secular art
galleries display religious imagery ranging from the inspiring to the
obscene.
A good newspaper should protect writers against themselves,
and their public against the outpourings of nutters.
When an author (like Johnny Hart) becomes a reli-nutter
redactional policy should be to drop him as a contributor.
But maybe I am expecting too much,
I hope so. My expectations of newspapers, should I ever read one again
(as opposed to their online sites), wouldn't include their ability to
protect either me from their writer's opinions or their writers from
themselves.
I pay for, and expect, a quality newspaper.
That of course means quality content.
Perhaps the phenomenon is unknown in your part of the world?
Most US newspapers contain new articles and opinion articles. There
is no expectation by the publisher or the reader for the opinion
articles to have any standard of the type of quality involved in
regard to the publisher's or the reader's agreement with the position.
The _Orlando Sentinel_ usually runs opposing opinion articles by
columnists or readers. If they run an opinion article that takes a
pro-(subject) stance, they will run it side-by-side with an opinion
article with an opposite stance. It's up to the reader to decide
which represents quality.
I would not be opposed to the _Orlando Sentinel_ publishing an opinion
piece espousing a religious view that I oppose and personally feel
does not include factual quality as long as they also give voice to an
opposing article.
This is timely. Trump's administration is taking steps to allow
employers with "moral or religious" objections to providing
contraception as part of health insurance. I expect to see opinion
pieces in the _Orlando Sentinel_ agreeing or disagreeing with this.
What you seem to want is your newspaper making the decision for you as
to what is "quality" and acceptable. I want to make that decision
myself.
To tie this in with comics in the newspaper, the _Orlando Sentinel_
carries both "Doonesbury" and "Mallard Fillmore" on the comic page
with "Doonesbury" labeled as "From the Left" and "Mallard Fillmore"
labeled "From the Right".
"Mallard Fillmore" is a snarky right-wing strip that lacks - IMO -
quality. But, I think it's entirely appropriate to offer this for
people who want snarky right-wing idiocy.
When I canceled my last newspaper subscription the man
on the phone asked me why and I told him Mallared
Fillmore was the last straw. He sighed and hung up.
Cheryl
2017-10-06 22:48:52 UTC
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Horace LaBadie
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but
that the fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a
decade after his death.
Perri Hart, John's daughter, and Mick and Mason
Mastrioanni, Johnny
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Horace LaBadie
Hart's grandsons.
Ah. Are they continuing the easter tradition of overt and
disturbing xian imagery?
Judge for yourself.
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I'm not sure what's particularly disturbing about that one (although
IIRC some of the others are of questionable taste), but it always
surprises me that rationalist übermenschen are so delicate that
accidental exposure to religion burns them like vampires in sunlight.
You're being an ass.
Having a comic strip in the newspaper showing a cross on a hill with
blood coming down the hill to a kneeling figure is simply offensive.
Having it in a comic strip that is otherwise about *CAVEMEN* is
insulting. Having this sort of Xian imagery on the comics page is
inappropriate in a secular newspaper.
And, for the record, that strip pissed me off when I was
still a
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
Post by Lewis
church-goer and long before I was an atheist.
The world's full of offensive imagery (and text!), or perhaps I should
say imagery and text someone is bound to find offensive, and your
initial reaction - to stop reading it - is pretty much exactly what I
usually do when I encounter something offensive.
I don't agree with you that a secular newspaper should avoid religious
imagery. I think they should (and probably do) publish
whatever imagery
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
they think most of their readers want to see, just as secular art
galleries display religious imagery ranging from the inspiring to the
obscene.
A good newspaper should protect writers against themselves,
and their public against the outpourings of nutters.
When an author (like Johnny Hart) becomes a reli-nutter
redactional policy should be to drop him as a contributor.
But maybe I am expecting too much,
I hope so. My expectations of newspapers, should I ever read one again
(as opposed to their online sites), wouldn't include their
ability to
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Cheryl
protect either me from their writer's opinions or their writers from
themselves.
I pay for, and expect, a quality newspaper.
That of course means quality content.
Perhaps the phenomenon is unknown in your part of the world?
Jan
PS I looked it up, BC, translated to 'Oerm'
did appear in a Dutch newspaper on a daily basis.
(The AD, not a quality newspaper)
They dropped it a long time ago,
perhaps 30 years, don't know why.
Wizard of Id, idem.
I thought we were discussing the newspaper's efforts to protect their
writers and readers, not the quality of their content. In any case,
as I said, I haven't bought a newspaper in years, so I can hardly
comment on the quality of modern Canadian newspapers, let alone Dutch
ones. I also have no idea what comics (if any) they now publish. I do
have some memory of the strips you mention and some others. Maybe
some of them still have a life in newspapers or online. I haven't
bothered to check.
--
Cheryl
Horace LaBadie
2017-10-06 23:35:54 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
I thought we were discussing the newspaper's efforts to protect their
writers and readers, not the quality of their content. In any case,
as I said, I haven't bought a newspaper in years, so I can hardly
comment on the quality of modern Canadian newspapers, let alone Dutch
ones. I also have no idea what comics (if any) they now publish. I do
have some memory of the strips you mention and some others. Maybe
some of them still have a life in newspapers or online. I haven't
bothered to check.
--
Cheryl
Go Comics.

<http://www.gocomics.com/comics/a-to-z>
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-10-07 13:26:19 UTC
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[ ... ]
I pay for, and expect, a quality newspaper.
That of course means quality content.
Perhaps the phenomenon is unknown in your part of the world?
Jan
PS I looked it up, BC, translated to 'Oerm'
did appear in a Dutch newspaper on a daily basis.
(The AD, not a quality newspaper)
They dropped it a long time ago,
perhaps 30 years, don't know why.
Wizard of Id, idem.
Just a coincidence that a newspaper called Anno Domini included a strip
called Before Christ?
--
athel
J. J. Lodder
2017-10-07 20:12:42 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ ... ]
I pay for, and expect, a quality newspaper.
That of course means quality content.
Perhaps the phenomenon is unknown in your part of the world?
Jan
PS I looked it up, BC, translated to 'Oerm'
did appear in a Dutch newspaper on a daily basis.
(The AD, not a quality newspaper)
They dropped it a long time ago,
perhaps 30 years, don't know why.
Wizard of Id, idem.
Just a coincidence that a newspaper called Anno Domini included a strip
called Before Christ?
Just a coincidence no doubt. Perhaps that's why they translated B.C.
(both the strip and the main character) to 'Oerm'. [1]

They still exist, <www.ad.nl>
Originally it was an abbreviation for 'Algemeen Dagblad'.
(lit. General Newspaper)
They pretended not to have any bias or affilation at all,
and thereby to be a newspaper suitable for everybody.

A common disease of right-wingers btw,
they tend to think that everybody is just like them.
The AD does pretend to being a quality newspaper,
but they never succeeded in being generally accepted as such,

Jan

[1] 'Oer-' like German 'Ur-' is a general purpose prefix
that doesn't exist in English as such.
(but cgnate with English 'ore', as in iron ore)

It is a reinforcer often meaning 'very'
'Oeroud' -> very old. 'Oertijd' -> Prehistory. Oersterk -> very strong.
'Oermens' -> human from very long ago, may be the source for 'Oerm'.

PS The 'Wizard of Id' became 'De Tovenaar van Fop',
also discontinued long ago. 'Fop' from 'foppen'
(E. to fool, or mock, as in mock turtle),
For example in 'fopspeen' (E. dummy teat, pacifier, comforter)
Horace LaBadie
2017-10-07 20:24:31 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
[ ... ]
I pay for, and expect, a quality newspaper.
That of course means quality content.
Perhaps the phenomenon is unknown in your part of the world?
Jan
PS I looked it up, BC, translated to 'Oerm'
did appear in a Dutch newspaper on a daily basis.
(The AD, not a quality newspaper)
They dropped it a long time ago,
perhaps 30 years, don't know why.
Wizard of Id, idem.
Just a coincidence that a newspaper called Anno Domini included a strip
called Before Christ?
Just a coincidence no doubt. Perhaps that's why they translated B.C.
(both the strip and the main character) to 'Oerm'. [1]
They still exist, <www.ad.nl>
Originally it was an abbreviation for 'Algemeen Dagblad'.
(lit. General Newspaper)
They pretended not to have any bias or affilation at all,
and thereby to be a newspaper suitable for everybody.
A common disease of right-wingers btw,
they tend to think that everybody is just like them.
The AD does pretend to being a quality newspaper,
but they never succeeded in being generally accepted as such,
Jan
[1] 'Oer-' like German 'Ur-' is a general purpose prefix
that doesn't exist in English as such.
(but cgnate with English 'ore', as in iron ore)
It is a reinforcer often meaning 'very'
'Oeroud' -> very old. 'Oertijd' -> Prehistory. Oersterk -> very strong.
'Oermens' -> human from very long ago, may be the source for 'Oerm'.
PS The 'Wizard of Id' became 'De Tovenaar van Fop',
also discontinued long ago. 'Fop' from 'foppen'
(E. to fool, or mock, as in mock turtle),
For example in 'fopspeen' (E. dummy teat, pacifier, comforter)
The strip is named after B.C. the character, and we really have no idea
if B.C. means anything other than B.C.

There is a minor recurring character named Anno Domini, an
Italian-accented explorer, whom Peter discovered in the "New World,"
along with an American Indian, Conahontay.

There is some evidence that the strip is in a post-apocalyptic era
(e.g., a reference to the United States).
Adam Funk
2017-10-10 09:24:09 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I'm not sure what's particularly disturbing about that one (although
IIRC some of the others are of questionable taste), but it always
surprises me that rationalist übermenschen are so delicate that
accidental exposure to religion burns them like vampires in sunlight.
You're being an ass.
Having a comic strip in the newspaper showing a cross on a hill with
blood coming down the hill to a kneeling figure is simply offensive.
I haven't seen that one, but OK. (It's interesting that that kind of
content is OK when it's "high art", though.)
Post by Lewis
Having it in a comic strip that is otherwise about *CAVEMEN* is
insulting. Having this sort of Xian imagery on the comics page is
inappropriate in a secular newspaper.
That's what I mean about being so delicate --- the demand that a
newspaper should be totally secular.
--
In the 1970s, people began receiving utility bills for
-£999,999,996.32 and it became harder to sustain the
myth of the infallible electronic brain. (Verity Stob)
Lewis
2017-10-10 16:32:10 UTC
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Post by Adam Funk
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I'm not sure what's particularly disturbing about that one (although
IIRC some of the others are of questionable taste), but it always
surprises me that rationalist übermenschen are so delicate that
accidental exposure to religion burns them like vampires in sunlight.
You're being an ass.
Having a comic strip in the newspaper showing a cross on a hill with
blood coming down the hill to a kneeling figure is simply offensive.
I haven't seen that one, but OK. (It's interesting that that kind of
content is OK when it's "high art", though.)
The point isn't the image, the point is that it was on the comics page.
And that it was part of a series of pro-Xian evangelism on the comics
page.
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Lewis
Having it in a comic strip that is otherwise about *CAVEMEN* is
insulting. Having this sort of Xian imagery on the comics page is
inappropriate in a secular newspaper.
That's what I mean about being so delicate --- the demand that a
newspaper should be totally secular.
No, that's not what I said.
--
Elves are wonderful. They provoke wonder. Elves are marvelous. They
cause marvels. Elves are fantastic. They create fantasies. Elves are
glamorous. They project glamour. Elves are enchanting. They weave
enchantment. Elves are terrific. They beget terror.
Cheryl
2017-10-10 16:36:23 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I'm not sure what's particularly disturbing about that one (although
IIRC some of the others are of questionable taste), but it always
surprises me that rationalist übermenschen are so delicate that
accidental exposure to religion burns them like vampires in sunlight.
You're being an ass.
Having a comic strip in the newspaper showing a cross on a hill with
blood coming down the hill to a kneeling figure is simply offensive.
I haven't seen that one, but OK. (It's interesting that that kind of
content is OK when it's "high art", though.)
The point isn't the image, the point is that it was on the comics page.
And that it was part of a series of pro-Xian evangelism on the comics
page.
Comics are created for anything from children's amusement to commentary
on current political issues. I don't know why evangelism - Christian or
any other kind - would not be found in comics, and therefore on the
comics page.
--
Cheryl
Lewis
2017-10-10 20:08:23 UTC
Reply
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I'm not sure what's particularly disturbing about that one (although
IIRC some of the others are of questionable taste), but it always
surprises me that rationalist übermenschen are so delicate that
accidental exposure to religion burns them like vampires in sunlight.
You're being an ass.
Having a comic strip in the newspaper showing a cross on a hill with
blood coming down the hill to a kneeling figure is simply offensive.
I haven't seen that one, but OK. (It's interesting that that kind of
content is OK when it's "high art", though.)
The point isn't the image, the point is that it was on the comics page.
And that it was part of a series of pro-Xian evangelism on the comics
page.
Comics are created for anything from children's amusement to commentary
on current political issues.
In the US there are two areas that comics will appear.
Political/editorial comics will appear in the editorial section. "Funny"
comics will appear all together in a "comics page" which may span more
than one page and are almost always grouped with things like the
crossword, word jumbles, sokuko, Dear Abby. Chess puzzles, Bridge
columns, and/or horoscopes.
Post by Cheryl
I don't know why evangelism - Christian or any other kind - would not
be found in comics, and therefore on the comics page.
Comics pages must be very different in Canada?

But it's all "a cow's opinion" at this point, it's not like newspapers have
any relevance and most people under 30 probably have no idea what a
comics page is.
--
The reaper does not listen to the harvest. --Reaper Man
Cheryl
2017-10-11 10:39:32 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Cheryl
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I'm not sure what's particularly disturbing about that one (although
IIRC some of the others are of questionable taste), but it always
surprises me that rationalist übermenschen are so delicate that
accidental exposure to religion burns them like vampires in sunlight.
You're being an ass.
Having a comic strip in the newspaper showing a cross on a hill with
blood coming down the hill to a kneeling figure is simply offensive.
I haven't seen that one, but OK. (It's interesting that that kind of
content is OK when it's "high art", though.)
The point isn't the image, the point is that it was on the comics page.
And that it was part of a series of pro-Xian evangelism on the comics
page.
Comics are created for anything from children's amusement to commentary
on current political issues.
In the US there are two areas that comics will appear.
Political/editorial comics will appear in the editorial section. "Funny"
comics will appear all together in a "comics page" which may span more
than one page and are almost always grouped with things like the
crossword, word jumbles, sokuko, Dear Abby. Chess puzzles, Bridge
columns, and/or horoscopes.
Post by Cheryl
I don't know why evangelism - Christian or any other kind - would not
be found in comics, and therefore on the comics page.
Comics pages must be very different in Canada?
But it's all "a cow's opinion" at this point, it's not like newspapers have
any relevance and most people under 30 probably have no idea what a
comics page is.
Oh, certainly. I haven't seen one in ages, although I do sometimes read
comics online, but then I go looking for them, so I don't go to a comics
page and read them all. I seem to recall back in the day L'il Abner and
Pogo showing up on the comics page, and although I missed a lot of
references when I was very young, they were certainly political. There
was an cartoon - one - on the editorial pages too. Different newspapers
had different cartoonists; they didn't seem to do strips.

But it was all long ago.
--
Cheryl
Peter Moylan
2017-10-11 02:15:30 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Having a comic strip in the newspaper showing a cross on a hill with
blood coming down the hill to a kneeling figure is simply offensive.
Having it in a comic strip that is otherwise about*CAVEMEN* is
insulting. Having this sort of Xian imagery on the comics page is
inappropriate in a secular newspaper.
It's not clear to me who is being insulted. It sounds as if the strip is
suggesting that Christianity is a caveman religion.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-05 21:31:58 UTC
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Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw, but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
Perri Hart, John's daughter, and Mick and Mason Mastrioanni, Johnny
Hart's grandsons.
Ah. Are they continuing the easter tradition of overt and disturbing xian
imagery?
Judge for yourself.
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/4/16>
I'm not sure what's particularly disturbing about that one (although
IIRC some of the others are of questionable taste), but it always
surprises me that rationalist übermenschen are so delicate that
accidental exposure to religion burns them like vampires in sunlight.
Does Screwy Lewie also refuse to look at, say, the paintings and sculptures of
Michelangelo?
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-10-04 07:07:59 UTC
Reply
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Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw,
me too
Post by Lewis
but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
I remember being shocked to see BC used as a pro-christian platform on
an Easter Sunday once, and stopped reading both his strips at that
point.
I didn't see them often enough to "stop", but I was always shocked to
realize that he was a fundie. (Much like realizing that Scott Adams is
a misogynist. Apparently he also sees Trump as a "master wizard". Ugh.)
--
athel
J. J. Lodder
2017-10-04 07:59:49 UTC
Reply
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw,
me too
Post by Lewis
but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
I remember being shocked to see BC used as a pro-christian platform on
an Easter Sunday once, and stopped reading both his strips at that
point.
I didn't see them often enough to "stop", but I was always shocked to
realize that he was a fundie. (Much like realizing that Scott Adams is
a misogynist. Apparently he also sees Trump as a "master wizard". Ugh.)
Only in later life.
For the first 25 years of BC he was a christian,
but not a very fundie one,

Jan
Adam Funk
2017-10-05 07:46:58 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw,
me too
Post by Lewis
but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
I remember being shocked to see BC used as a pro-christian platform on
an Easter Sunday once, and stopped reading both his strips at that
point.
I didn't see them often enough to "stop", but I was always shocked to
realize that he was a fundie. (Much like realizing that Scott Adams is
a misogynist. Apparently he also sees Trump as a "master wizard". Ugh.)
IIRC, Adams supported Trump because H Clinton wanted to raise
inheritance taxes. That strikes me as at the same level of nuttiness
as the voting bloc that can be relied on to support anyone who makes
anti-abortion noises regardless of other polices or principles (or
lack thereof).
--
"Gonzo, is that the contract from the devil?"
"No, Kermit, it's worse than that. This is the bill from special
effects."
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-10-05 18:55:10 UTC
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Post by Adam Funk
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw,
me too
Post by Lewis
but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
I remember being shocked to see BC used as a pro-christian platform on
an Easter Sunday once, and stopped reading both his strips at that
point.
I didn't see them often enough to "stop", but I was always shocked to
realize that he was a fundie. (Much like realizing that Scott Adams is
a misogynist. Apparently he also sees Trump as a "master wizard". Ugh.)
IIRC, Adams supported Trump because H Clinton wanted to raise
inheritance taxes. That strikes me as at the same level of nuttiness
as the voting bloc that can be relied on to support anyone who makes
anti-abortion noises regardless of other polices or principles (or
lack thereof).
Maybe, but it was after seeing the video in which Trump boasted about
grabbing women by the pussy that Adams announced that he was a "master
wizard".
--
athel
Adam Funk
2017-10-10 09:24:43 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw,
me too
Post by Lewis
but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
I remember being shocked to see BC used as a pro-christian platform on
an Easter Sunday once, and stopped reading both his strips at that
point.
I didn't see them often enough to "stop", but I was always shocked to
realize that he was a fundie. (Much like realizing that Scott Adams is
a misogynist. Apparently he also sees Trump as a "master wizard". Ugh.)
IIRC, Adams supported Trump because H Clinton wanted to raise
inheritance taxes. That strikes me as at the same level of nuttiness
as the voting bloc that can be relied on to support anyone who makes
anti-abortion noises regardless of other polices or principles (or
lack thereof).
Maybe, but it was after seeing the video in which Trump boasted about
grabbing women by the pussy that Adams announced that he was a "master
wizard".
Urgh.
--
It takes a thousand men to invent a telegraph, or a steam engine, or a
phonograph, or a telephone or any other important thing --- and the
last man gets the credit and we forget the others. ---Mark Twain
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-05 21:29:49 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw,
me too
Post by Lewis
but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
I remember being shocked to see BC used as a pro-christian platform on
an Easter Sunday once, and stopped reading both his strips at that
point.
I didn't see them often enough to "stop", but I was always shocked to
realize that he was a fundie. (Much like realizing that Scott Adams is
a misogynist. Apparently he also sees Trump as a "master wizard". Ugh.)
IIRC, Adams supported Trump because H Clinton wanted to raise
inheritance taxes. That strikes me as at the same level of nuttiness
as the voting bloc that can be relied on to support anyone who makes
anti-abortion noises regardless of other polices or principles (or
lack thereof).
A republican congressman from Pennsylvania announced today that he won't be
running for a 9th term next year. A staunch anti-abortionist, it has now been
revealed that he (a) had a mistress [not his wife] and (b) asked her to have
an abortion when he impregnated her. (He's already a grandpa.)
Horace LaBadie
2017-10-05 23:20:02 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw,
me too
Post by Lewis
but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
I remember being shocked to see BC used as a pro-christian platform on
an Easter Sunday once, and stopped reading both his strips at that
point.
I didn't see them often enough to "stop", but I was always shocked to
realize that he was a fundie. (Much like realizing that Scott Adams is
a misogynist. Apparently he also sees Trump as a "master wizard". Ugh.)
IIRC, Adams supported Trump because H Clinton wanted to raise
inheritance taxes. That strikes me as at the same level of nuttiness
as the voting bloc that can be relied on to support anyone who makes
anti-abortion noises regardless of other polices or principles (or
lack thereof).
A republican congressman from Pennsylvania announced today that he won't be
running for a 9th term next year. A staunch anti-abortionist, it has now been
revealed that he (a) had a mistress [not his wife] and (b) asked her to have
an abortion when he impregnated her. (He's already a grandpa.)
He's since resigned, effective two weeks from today. And the mistress
was not, in fact, pregnant, as it turned out. Irony abounds.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-06 03:13:48 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Lewis
Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
Am am surprise to see that not only is BC still being draw,
me too
Post by Lewis
but that the
fundie christer's name is still on it as an author a decade after his
death.
I remember being shocked to see BC used as a pro-christian platform on
an Easter Sunday once, and stopped reading both his strips at that
point.
I didn't see them often enough to "stop", but I was always shocked to
realize that he was a fundie. (Much like realizing that Scott Adams is
a misogynist. Apparently he also sees Trump as a "master wizard". Ugh.)
IIRC, Adams supported Trump because H Clinton wanted to raise
inheritance taxes. That strikes me as at the same level of nuttiness
as the voting bloc that can be relied on to support anyone who makes
anti-abortion noises regardless of other polices or principles (or
lack thereof).
A republican congressman from Pennsylvania announced today that he won't be
running for a 9th term next year. A staunch anti-abortionist, it has now been
revealed that he (a) had a mistress [not his wife] and (b) asked her to have
an abortion when he impregnated her. (He's already a grandpa.)
He's since resigned, effective two weeks from today. And the mistress
was not, in fact, pregnant, as it turned out. Irony abounds.
So there's a vacancy until a special election can be scheduled (unlike in the
Senate, where a replacement has to be appointed immediately, and then an election
is scheduled to fill out the unexpired term). I don't know where his district
is, but it'll be easier to flip than Gingrich's old one in Georgia that missed
by a couple of percentage points.
Adam Funk
2017-10-10 15:50:55 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
A republican congressman from Pennsylvania announced today that he won't be
running for a 9th term next year. A staunch anti-abortionist, it has now been
revealed that he (a) had a mistress [not his wife] and (b) asked her to have
an abortion when he impregnated her. (He's already a grandpa.)
He's since resigned, effective two weeks from today. And the mistress
was not, in fact, pregnant, as it turned out. Irony abounds.
Am I interpreting this right: the mistress wasn't pregnant; he thought
she was; he did tell her to get an abortion; the last bit is why he
resigned?
--
Racism is a worldwide problem, but thanks to George Wallace, it's
always a little more convenient to play it with a Southern accent.
--- Patterson Hood
Horace LaBadie
2017-10-10 16:08:02 UTC
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Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
A republican congressman from Pennsylvania announced today that he won't be
running for a 9th term next year. A staunch anti-abortionist, it has now been
revealed that he (a) had a mistress [not his wife] and (b) asked her to have
an abortion when he impregnated her. (He's already a grandpa.)
He's since resigned, effective two weeks from today. And the mistress
was not, in fact, pregnant, as it turned out. Irony abounds.
Am I interpreting this right: the mistress wasn't pregnant; he thought
she was; he did tell her to get an abortion; the last bit is why he
resigned?
Yes.
Tony Cooper
2017-10-10 17:29:35 UTC
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Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
A republican congressman from Pennsylvania announced today that he won't be
running for a 9th term next year. A staunch anti-abortionist, it has now been
revealed that he (a) had a mistress [not his wife] and (b) asked her to have
an abortion when he impregnated her. (He's already a grandpa.)
He's since resigned, effective two weeks from today. And the mistress
was not, in fact, pregnant, as it turned out. Irony abounds.
Am I interpreting this right: the mistress wasn't pregnant; he thought
she was; he did tell her to get an abortion; the last bit is why he
resigned?
Yes, but he resigned because he was caught out. Had he not been
caught, he wouldn't have resigned.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Rich Ulrich
2017-10-11 03:35:24 UTC
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On Tue, 10 Oct 2017 13:29:35 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
A republican congressman from Pennsylvania announced today that he won't be
running for a 9th term next year. A staunch anti-abortionist, it has now been
revealed that he (a) had a mistress [not his wife] and (b) asked her to have
an abortion when he impregnated her. (He's already a grandpa.)
He's since resigned, effective two weeks from today. And the mistress
was not, in fact, pregnant, as it turned out. Irony abounds.
Am I interpreting this right: the mistress wasn't pregnant; he thought
she was; he did tell her to get an abortion; the last bit is why he
resigned?
Yes, but he resigned because he was caught out. Had he not been
caught, he wouldn't have resigned.
I'm pretty sure that one thing that hurt him was a further
complication in the hypocrisy: In justifying the contrast
of his actions with various staunch anti-abortionist comments
published under his name, he assesrted that his staff had
written those columns; and he did not necessarily agree with
those opinions. - I wonder if he gives press interviews while
drunk or if he is just that dumb to think he would not get
quoted, or it would not matter.
--
Rich Ulrich
Adam Funk
2017-10-11 13:39:30 UTC
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Post by Rich Ulrich
On Tue, 10 Oct 2017 13:29:35 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Adam Funk
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
A republican congressman from Pennsylvania announced today that he won't be
running for a 9th term next year. A staunch anti-abortionist, it has now been
revealed that he (a) had a mistress [not his wife] and (b) asked her to have
an abortion when he impregnated her. (He's already a grandpa.)
He's since resigned, effective two weeks from today. And the mistress
was not, in fact, pregnant, as it turned out. Irony abounds.
Am I interpreting this right: the mistress wasn't pregnant; he thought
she was; he did tell her to get an abortion; the last bit is why he
resigned?
Yes, but he resigned because he was caught out. Had he not been
caught, he wouldn't have resigned.
I'm pretty sure that one thing that hurt him was a further
complication in the hypocrisy: In justifying the contrast
of his actions with various staunch anti-abortionist comments
published under his name, he assesrted that his staff had
written those columns; and he did not necessarily agree with
those opinions. - I wonder if he gives press interviews while
drunk or if he is just that dumb to think he would not get
quoted, or it would not matter.
It seems to be fairly normal these days for hypocritical politicians
to just keep making up excuses until they get sunk.
--
Gentlemen, you can't fight in here! This is the War Room.
--- President Muffley
b***@gmail.com
2017-10-04 17:09:21 UTC
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Post by Adam Funk
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
--
Physics is like sex. Sure, it may give some practical results, but
that's not why we do it. --- Richard Feynman
<http://www.gocomics.com/bc/2017/10/03>
--
Physics is like sex. Sure, it may give some practical results, but
that's not why we do it.
i wonder how many times people have read that sig line and been tempted to ask "innit that ass-backwards mate?" --- Richard Feynman
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