Discussion:
a sandwich for all of them
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a***@gmail.com
2017-10-10 08:30:07 UTC
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1) I bought a sandwich for the children.
2) I bought a sandwich for them.

3) I bought a sandwich for all the children.
4) I bought a sandwich for them all.

5) I bought a sandwich for all of them.

Which can be used if I bought a sandwich for each?

Gratefully,
Navi.
LFS
2017-10-10 08:58:36 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I bought a sandwich for the children.
2) I bought a sandwich for them.
3) I bought a sandwich for all the children.
4) I bought a sandwich for them all.
5) I bought a sandwich for all of them.
Which can be used if I bought a sandwich for each?
Gratefully,
Navi.
In the context of a conversation, all of the sentences could convey that
meaning - unless, of course, the children were sharing a single sandwich.

"I bought a sandwich for each child" would be preferable.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
GordonD
2017-10-10 10:20:59 UTC
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Post by LFS
1) I bought a sandwich for the children. 2) I bought a sandwich for
them.
3) I bought a sandwich for all the children. 4) I bought a sandwich
for them all.
5) I bought a sandwich for all of them.
Which can be used if I bought a sandwich for each?
Gratefully, Navi.
In the context of a conversation, all of the sentences could convey
that meaning - unless, of course, the children were sharing a single
sandwich.
"I bought a sandwich for each child" would be preferable.
"I bought sandwiches for the children" sounds more natural to me. Of
course it doesn't tell you how many sandwiches each child had, but would
that matter under normal circumstances?
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Cheryl
2017-10-10 10:29:42 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by LFS
1) I bought a sandwich for the children. 2) I bought a sandwich for
them.
3) I bought a sandwich for all the children. 4) I bought a sandwich
for them all.
5) I bought a sandwich for all of them.
Which can be used if I bought a sandwich for each?
Gratefully, Navi.
In the context of a conversation, all of the sentences could convey
that meaning - unless, of course, the children were sharing a single
sandwich.
"I bought a sandwich for each child" would be preferable.
"I bought sandwiches for the children" sounds more natural to me. Of
course it doesn't tell you how many sandwiches each child had, but would
that matter under normal circumstances?
That would be a natural way to express it - unless, as you say, there
were special circumstances. If you ran out of sandwiches, you might
protest "I bought a sandwich for each child!". I can't imagine saying I
bought a sandwich for the children (or all the children). Even if there
were only two children, a single sandwich might not be enough, and that
sentence implies to me that all the children had to share a single sandwich.
--
Cheryl
RH Draney
2017-10-10 12:34:51 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
"I bought sandwiches for the children" sounds more natural to me. Of
course it doesn't tell you how many sandwiches each child had, but would
that matter under normal circumstances?
That would be a natural way to express it - unless, as you say, there
were special circumstances. If you ran out of sandwiches, you might
protest "I bought a sandwich for each child!". I can't imagine saying I
bought a sandwich for the children (or all the children). Even if there
were only two children, a single sandwich might not be enough, and that
sentence implies to me that all the children had to share a single sandwich.
One of those six-foot party subs they sell for catering, perhaps...(if
Areff were here, we could ask him if such a thing is actually a
sandwich)....r
Jenny Telia
2017-10-11 09:10:44 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I bought a sandwich for the children.
2) I bought a sandwich for them.
3) I bought a sandwich for all the children.
4) I bought a sandwich for them all.
5) I bought a sandwich for all of them.
Which can be used if I bought a sandwich for each?
<sigh> I sincerely hope you remember the (correct) answers to all your
queries since time immemorial. You do realise that, just before you pass
away, all your text queries (and their answers) will flash past your
eyes? </end sigh>
RH Draney
2017-10-11 13:41:39 UTC
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Post by Jenny Telia
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I bought a sandwich for the children.
2) I bought a sandwich for them.
3) I bought a sandwich for all the children.
4) I bought a sandwich for them all.
5) I bought a sandwich for all of them.
Which can be used if I bought a sandwich for each?
<sigh> I sincerely hope you remember the (correct) answers to all your
queries since time immemorial. You do realise that, just before you pass
away, all your text queries (and their answers) will flash past your
eyes? </end sigh>
And every ten or eleven years even after you pass away, be answered
again by someone posting from Google Groups....r
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-11 16:14:30 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Jenny Telia
<sigh> I sincerely hope you remember the (correct) answers to all your
queries since time immemorial. You do realise that, just before you pass
away, all your text queries (and their answers) will flash past your
eyes? </end sigh>
And every ten or eleven years even after you pass away, be answered
again by someone posting from Google Groups....r
No, not from Google Groups. From gmail, which shows them the initiating message
of a newsgroup thread with no hint that it is (a) old or (b) the progenitor of
other messages in a thread or (c) in such a thing as a newsgroup or a Google Group.
a***@gmail.com
2017-10-12 10:56:20 UTC
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Post by Jenny Telia
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I bought a sandwich for the children.
2) I bought a sandwich for them.
3) I bought a sandwich for all the children.
4) I bought a sandwich for them all.
5) I bought a sandwich for all of them.
Which can be used if I bought a sandwich for each?
<sigh> I sincerely hope you remember the (correct) answers to all your
queries since time immemorial. You do realise that, just before you pass
away, all your text queries (and their answers) will flash past your
eyes? </end sigh>
Thank you all very much for all your replies,

Nobody knows what will flash past my eyes just before I pass away... And
it won't really matter after I have passed away... So don't worry.

Everything comes to an end. There will be a day when I won't ask any more
questions. My cyber-ghost will be floating about in cyberspace contemplating
its own absence.

Nothing lasts, but let's look at the bright side of things...
or maybe that is the bright side!

Respectfully,
Navi (the Anbidan).

Harrison Hill
2017-10-11 17:23:20 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) I bought a sandwich for the children.
2) I bought a sandwich for them.
3) I bought a sandwich for all the children.
4) I bought a sandwich for them all.
5) I bought a sandwich for all of them.
Which can be used if I bought a sandwich for each?
Gratefully,
Navi.
All of them are very natural, and unambiguously mean:

6) I bought a sandwich for each of the children.

For the hair-splitters, that will still be ambiguous. So:

7) I bought sandwiches for each of the children.

...doesn't help.
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