Discussion:
Fun with analogies
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RHDraney
2018-08-03 04:04:10 UTC
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We had one come up at trivia this week...this wasn't the actual
question, but one that arose during the subsequent discussion:

Q: Sphere is to circle as _________ is to square.
A: Pyramid
B: Prism
C: Cylinder
D: Cube
E: Cone

A group *not* made up of MENSA members would probably answer D (a form
of the analogy in the actual quiz question)...I contend that C is
actually a more accurate answer, and can easily make a solid (heh!) case
for A as well....r
Richard Yates
2018-08-03 04:55:25 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
We had one come up at trivia this week...this wasn't the actual
Q: Sphere is to circle as _________ is to square.
A: Pyramid
B: Prism
C: Cylinder
D: Cube
E: Cone
A group *not* made up of MENSA members would probably answer D (a form
of the analogy in the actual quiz question)...I contend that C is
actually a more accurate answer, and can easily make a solid (heh!) case
for A as well....r
A sphere is the volume enclosed by a circle that is rotated around a
line bisecting it; a cylinder is the volume enclosed by a square that
is rotated around a line bisecting two opposite sides.

Similarly, is sphere to circle as cone is to pyramid?

However, the odds are far better that the test compilers meant the
answer to be D so smart-asses, however correct, get no points.
Peter Moylan
2018-08-03 06:03:30 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
We had one come up at trivia this week...this wasn't the actual
Q: Sphere is to circle as _________ is to square.
A: Pyramid
B: Prism
C: Cylinder
D: Cube
E: Cone
A group *not* made up of MENSA members would probably answer D (a form
of the analogy in the actual quiz question)...I contend that C is
actually a more accurate answer, and can easily make a solid (heh!) case
for A as well....r
I would have said A if the first word had been "hemisphere".

For C to work, it would have to be a capped (closed) cylinder.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-08-03 07:17:29 UTC
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On Fri, 3 Aug 2018 16:03:30 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by RHDraney
We had one come up at trivia this week...this wasn't the actual
Q: Sphere is to circle as _________ is to square.
A: Pyramid
B: Prism
C: Cylinder
D: Cube
E: Cone
A group *not* made up of MENSA members would probably answer D (a form
of the analogy in the actual quiz question)...I contend that C is
actually a more accurate answer, and can easily make a solid (heh!) case
for A as well....r
I would have said A if the first word had been "hemisphere".
For C to work, it would have to be a capped (closed) cylinder.
Also for C to work in general it would need to be reworded with
"rectangle" in place of "square".
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
charles
2018-08-03 08:12:44 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Fri, 3 Aug 2018 16:03:30 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by RHDraney
We had one come up at trivia this week...this wasn't the actual
Q: Sphere is to circle as _________ is to square.
A: Pyramid
B: Prism
C: Cylinder
D: Cube
E: Cone
A group *not* made up of MENSA members would probably answer D (a form
of the analogy in the actual quiz question)...I contend that C is
actually a more accurate answer, and can easily make a solid (heh!)
case for A as well....r
I would have said A if the first word had been "hemisphere".
For C to work, it would have to be a capped (closed) cylinder.
Also for C to work in general it would need to be reworded with
"rectangle" in place of "square".
my five year old granson already knows the diffeence between a square and a
rectangle
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
soup
2018-08-03 15:52:39 UTC
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Post by charles
my five year old granson already knows the diffeence between a square and a
rectangle
What difference? A square IS a rectangle OK a special case of one but it
is a rectangle.
RHDraney
2018-08-03 12:02:10 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by RHDraney
We had one come up at trivia this week...this wasn't the actual
Q:  Sphere is to circle as _________ is to square.
     A:  Pyramid
     B:  Prism
     C:  Cylinder
     D:  Cube
     E:  Cone
A group *not* made up of MENSA members would probably answer D (a form
of the analogy in the actual quiz question)...I contend that C is
actually a more accurate answer, and can easily make a solid (heh!) case
for A as well....r
I would have said A if the first word had been "hemisphere".
My justification for A is that the missing term is the three-dimensional
figure with the same number of "sides" as the corresponding 2D shape
(specifically a tetrahedron, of course, but that is in fact an instance
of a pyramid)....r
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-08-03 13:07:40 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by RHDraney
We had one come up at trivia this week...this wasn't the actual
Q:  Sphere is to circle as _________ is to square.
     A:  Pyramid
     B:  Prism
     C:  Cylinder
     D:  Cube
     E:  Cone
A group *not* made up of MENSA members would probably answer D (a form
of the analogy in the actual quiz question)...I contend that C is
actually a more accurate answer, and can easily make a solid (heh!) case
for A as well....r
I would have said A if the first word had been "hemisphere".
My justification for A is that the missing term is the three-dimensional
figure with the same number of "sides" as the corresponding 2D shape
(specifically a tetrahedron, of course, but that is in fact an instance
of a pyramid)....r
How does that relate to the circle -> sphere? A circle has no sides.
LFS
2018-08-03 13:25:17 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by RHDraney
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by RHDraney
We had one come up at trivia this week...this wasn't the actual
Q:  Sphere is to circle as _________ is to square.
     A:  Pyramid
     B:  Prism
     C:  Cylinder
     D:  Cube
     E:  Cone
A group *not* made up of MENSA members would probably answer D (a form
of the analogy in the actual quiz question)...I contend that C is
actually a more accurate answer, and can easily make a solid (heh!) case
for A as well....r
I would have said A if the first word had been "hemisphere".
My justification for A is that the missing term is the three-dimensional
figure with the same number of "sides" as the corresponding 2D shape
(specifically a tetrahedron, of course, but that is in fact an instance
of a pyramid)....r
How does that relate to the circle -> sphere? A circle has no sides.
I think it has as many as a sphere.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
RHDraney
2018-08-03 18:02:18 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by RHDraney
My justification for A is that the missing term is the three-dimensional
figure with the same number of "sides" as the corresponding 2D shape
(specifically a tetrahedron, of course, but that is in fact an instance
of a pyramid)....r
How does that relate to the circle -> sphere? A circle has no sides.
I think it has as many as a sphere.
Da...whether that number be one or aleph-one....r
J. J. Lodder
2018-08-03 20:01:31 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
Post by LFS
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by RHDraney
My justification for A is that the missing term is the three-dimensional
figure with the same number of "sides" as the corresponding 2D shape
(specifically a tetrahedron, of course, but that is in fact an instance
of a pyramid)....r
How does that relate to the circle -> sphere? A circle has no sides.
I think it has as many as a sphere.
Da...whether that number be one or aleph-one....r
If you see a circle as the limit of a polygon with many sides
the number of sides is countable all along,

Jan
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-08-03 22:44:46 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by RHDraney
Post by LFS
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by RHDraney
My justification for A is that the missing term is the three-dimensional
figure with the same number of "sides" as the corresponding 2D shape
(specifically a tetrahedron, of course, but that is in fact an instance
of a pyramid)....r
How does that relate to the circle -> sphere? A circle has no sides.
I think it has as many as a sphere.
Da...whether that number be one or aleph-one....r
If you see a circle as the limit of a polygon with many sides
the number of sides is countable all along,
That's a mighty big 'if'!
J. J. Lodder
2018-08-04 07:55:34 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by RHDraney
Post by LFS
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by RHDraney
My justification for A is that the missing term is the
three-dimensional figure with the same number of "sides" as the
corresponding 2D shape (specifically a tetrahedron, of course, but
that is in fact an instance of a pyramid)....r
How does that relate to the circle -> sphere? A circle has no sides.
I think it has as many as a sphere.
Da...whether that number be one or aleph-one....r
If you see a circle as the limit of a polygon with many sides
the number of sides is countable all along,
That's a mighty big 'if'!
Why? Archimedes already did so,
and calculated \pi with it.
What else could the limit of a regular polygon be,
for number of sides -> \infty ?

Jan
Jack
2018-08-04 00:16:27 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
Post by LFS
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by RHDraney
My justification for A is that the missing term is the three-dimensional
figure with the same number of "sides" as the corresponding 2D shape
(specifically a tetrahedron, of course, but that is in fact an instance
of a pyramid)....r
How does that relate to the circle -> sphere? A circle has no sides.
I think it has as many as a sphere.
Da...whether that number be one or aleph-one....r
If you look at it transversely, it has two.
--
John
RHDraney
2018-08-04 05:27:59 UTC
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Post by Jack
Post by RHDraney
Post by LFS
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
How does that relate to the circle -> sphere? A circle has no sides.
I think it has as many as a sphere.
Da...whether that number be one or aleph-one....r
If you look at it transversely, it has two.
Hooray for our side!...r
Peter Moylan
2018-08-04 07:34:54 UTC
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Post by Jack
Post by RHDraney
Post by LFS
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by RHDraney
My justification for A is that the missing term is the
three-dimensional figure with the same number of "sides" as
the corresponding 2D shape (specifically a tetrahedron, of
course, but that is in fact an instance of a pyramid)....r
How does that relate to the circle -> sphere? A circle has no sides.
I think it has as many as a sphere.
Da...whether that number be one or aleph-one....r
Smaller than aleph-one, I think. Jan's argument that it is countable
looks watertight to me.
Post by Jack
If you look at it transversely, it has two.
And, from another point of view, it has an inside and an outside.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-08-04 10:30:18 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jack
Post by RHDraney
Post by LFS
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by RHDraney
My justification for A is that the missing term is the
three-dimensional figure with the same number of "sides" as
the corresponding 2D shape (specifically a tetrahedron, of
course, but that is in fact an instance of a pyramid)....r
How does that relate to the circle -> sphere? A circle has no sides.
I think it has as many as a sphere.
Da...whether that number be one or aleph-one....r
Smaller than aleph-one, I think. Jan's argument that it is countable
looks watertight to me.
Post by Jack
If you look at it transversely, it has two.
And, from another point of view, it has an inside and an outside.
How can it be countable? A circle is the locus of all points an
equal distance from a given point on the plane. As points are
dimensionless they clearly are uncountable.
Peter Moylan
2018-08-04 11:04:17 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jack
Post by RHDraney
Post by LFS
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by RHDraney
My justification for A is that the missing term is the
three-dimensional figure with the same number of "sides" as
the corresponding 2D shape (specifically a tetrahedron, of
course, but that is in fact an instance of a pyramid)....r
How does that relate to the circle -> sphere? A circle has no sides.
I think it has as many as a sphere.
Da...whether that number be one or aleph-one....r
Smaller than aleph-one, I think. Jan's argument that it is countable
looks watertight to me.
Post by Jack
If you look at it transversely, it has two.
And, from another point of view, it has an inside and an outside.
How can it be countable? A circle is the locus of all points an
equal distance from a given point on the plane. As points are
dimensionless they clearly are uncountable.
You're counting points; I'm counting sides.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-08-04 11:23:09 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jack
Post by RHDraney
Post by LFS
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by RHDraney
My justification for A is that the missing term is the
three-dimensional figure with the same number of "sides" as
the corresponding 2D shape (specifically a tetrahedron, of
course, but that is in fact an instance of a pyramid)....r
How does that relate to the circle -> sphere? A circle has no sides.
I think it has as many as a sphere.
Da...whether that number be one or aleph-one....r
Smaller than aleph-one, I think. Jan's argument that it is countable
looks watertight to me.
Post by Jack
If you look at it transversely, it has two.
And, from another point of view, it has an inside and an outside.
How can it be countable? A circle is the locus of all points an
equal distance from a given point on the plane. As points are
dimensionless they clearly are uncountable.
You're counting points; I'm counting sides.
I'm not-counting what is there. You're counting what isn't.
Jerry Friedman
2018-08-04 13:29:37 UTC
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[sides of a circle]
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jack
Post by RHDraney
Post by LFS
I think it has as many as a sphere.
Da...whether that number be one or aleph-one....r
Smaller than aleph-one, I think. Jan's argument that it is countable
looks watertight to me.
Post by Jack
If you look at it transversely, it has two.
And, from another point of view, it has an inside and an outside.
How can it be countable? A circle is the locus of all points an
equal distance from a given point on the plane. As points are
dimensionless they clearly are uncountable.
Or as there's a one-to-one correspondence between the points on a circle
and the real numbers between 0 and 1.
Post by Peter Moylan
You're counting points; I'm counting sides.
But the limit of each of those sides is a point.

To put Madrigal's argument another way, a countable union of sets of
measure 0 has measure 0, so if a circle could be thought of as a
countable union of "sides" of measure 0, it would have to have measure
0, not 2 pi r.

In other other words, you can't take a limit of transfinite
cardinalities that way.
--
Jerry Friedman
Anders D. Nygaard
2018-08-04 20:31:08 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
Post by LFS
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by RHDraney
My justification for A is that the missing term is the
three-dimensional
figure with the same number of "sides" as the corresponding 2D shape
(specifically a tetrahedron, of course, but that is in fact an instance
of a pyramid)....r
How does that relate to the circle -> sphere? A circle has no sides.
I think it has as many as a sphere.
Da...whether that number be one or aleph-one....r
Or the power of the continuum (which may or may not be aleph-one).

/Anders, Denmark.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-03 14:22:21 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by RHDraney
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by RHDraney
We had one come up at trivia this week...this wasn't the actual
Q:  Sphere is to circle as _________ is to square.
     A:  Pyramid
     B:  Prism
     C:  Cylinder
     D:  Cube
     E:  Cone
A group *not* made up of MENSA members would probably answer D (a form
of the analogy in the actual quiz question)...I contend that C is
actually a more accurate answer, and can easily make a solid (heh!) case
for A as well....r
I would have said A if the first word had been "hemisphere".
My justification for A is that the missing term is the three-dimensional
figure with the same number of "sides" as the corresponding 2D shape
(specifically a tetrahedron, of course, but that is in fact an instance
of a pyramid)....r
How does that relate to the circle -> sphere? A circle has no sides.
It has an inside and an outside.
Bill Day
2018-08-03 23:45:37 UTC
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On Fri, 3 Aug 2018 07:22:21 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by RHDraney
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by RHDraney
We had one come up at trivia this week...this wasn't the actual
Q:  Sphere is to circle as _________ is to square.
     A:  Pyramid
     B:  Prism
     C:  Cylinder
     D:  Cube
     E:  Cone
A group *not* made up of MENSA members would probably answer D (a form
of the analogy in the actual quiz question)...I contend that C is
actually a more accurate answer, and can easily make a solid (heh!) case
for A as well....r
I would have said A if the first word had been "hemisphere".
My justification for A is that the missing term is the three-dimensional
figure with the same number of "sides" as the corresponding 2D shape
(specifically a tetrahedron, of course, but that is in fact an instance
of a pyramid)....r
How does that relate to the circle -> sphere? A circle has no sides.
It has an inside and an outside.
Definition by a schoolboy years ago. He got credit for it.

"A circle is a round straight line with a hole in the middle."
--
remove nonsense for reply
Peter Moylan
2018-08-04 07:36:53 UTC
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Post by Bill Day
Definition by a schoolboy years ago. He got credit for it.
"A circle is a round straight line with a hole in the middle."
It's a straight line in a sufficiently strong gravitational field.

(But something else, I gather, if the black hole is rotating.)
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
RHDraney
2018-08-04 12:52:56 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Bill Day
Definition by a schoolboy years ago. He got credit for it.
"A circle is a round straight line with a hole in the middle."
It's a straight line in a sufficiently strong gravitational field.
Conversely, a straight line is a circle with a radius of infinite
length....r
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-04 13:04:03 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Bill Day
Definition by a schoolboy years ago. He got credit for it.
"A circle is a round straight line with a hole in the middle."
It's a straight line in a sufficiently strong gravitational field.
Conversely, a straight line is a circle with a radius of infinite
length....r
I suspect it wouldn't be hard to poke a hole in that definition.
Jerry Friedman
2018-08-04 13:30:44 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by RHDraney
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Bill Day
Definition by a schoolboy years ago. He got credit for it.
"A circle is a round straight line with a hole in the middle."
It's a straight line in a sufficiently strong gravitational field.
Conversely, a straight line is a circle with a radius of infinite
length....r
I suspect it wouldn't be hard to poke a hole in that definition.
Just put the point at infinity into the hole.
--
Jerry Friedman
RHDraney
2018-08-04 18:22:06 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by RHDraney
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Bill Day
Definition by a schoolboy years ago. He got credit for it.
"A circle is a round straight line with a hole in the middle."
It's a straight line in a sufficiently strong gravitational field.
Conversely, a straight line is a circle with a radius of infinite
length....r
I suspect it wouldn't be hard to poke a hole in that definition.
Just put the point at infinity into the hole.
A straight line is also a hyperbola of infinite eccentricity (which
would be a great name for a rock band)....r
J. J. Lodder
2018-08-03 07:42:21 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
We had one come up at trivia this week...this wasn't the actual
Q: Sphere is to circle as _________ is to square.
A: Pyramid
B: Prism
C: Cylinder
D: Cube
E: Cone
A group *not* made up of MENSA members would probably answer D (a form
of the analogy in the actual quiz question)...I contend that C is
actually a more accurate answer, and can easily make a solid (heh!) case
for A as well....r
Those tests are made by dumb mensa members,
for dumb mensa members.
(who see only one possibility,
and think that their's must be the only right one)

Really intelligent people also know how to imitate,

Jan
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-03 14:58:23 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
We had one come up at trivia this week...this wasn't the actual
Q: Sphere is to circle as _________ is to square.
A: Pyramid
B: Prism
C: Cylinder
D: Cube
E: Cone
A group *not* made up of MENSA members would probably answer D (a form
of the analogy in the actual quiz question)...I contend that C is
actually a more accurate answer, and can easily make a solid (heh!) case
for A as well....r
MENSA members would be thinking too deeply. The correct answer is
"D".

https://www.eduplace.com/math/mthexp/g3/challenge/pdf/cm_g3_f_4.pdf

Miller Analogies Test:

https://tinyurl.com/y85rdnbs
RHDraney
2018-08-03 18:05:54 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by RHDraney
We had one come up at trivia this week...this wasn't the actual
Q: Sphere is to circle as _________ is to square.
A: Pyramid
B: Prism
C: Cylinder
D: Cube
E: Cone
A group *not* made up of MENSA members would probably answer D (a form
of the analogy in the actual quiz question)...I contend that C is
actually a more accurate answer, and can easily make a solid (heh!) case
for A as well....r
MENSA members would be thinking too deeply. The correct answer is
"D".
https://www.eduplace.com/math/mthexp/g3/challenge/pdf/cm_g3_f_4.pdf
https://tinyurl.com/y85rdnbs
Been a while since I've posted this, and I'm sure we have new people
here since then who might enjoy it:

Loading Image...

....r
Richard Tobin
2018-08-04 14:15:26 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
Been a while since I've posted this, and I'm sure we have new people
http://web.newsguy.com/dadoctah/images/IQTEST.JPG
From the GCHQ christmas puzzle 2015:

Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?

A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST

-- Richard
Peter Moylan
2018-08-04 14:48:27 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RHDraney
Been a while since I've posted this, and I'm sure we have new
http://web.newsguy.com/dadoctah/images/IQTEST.JPG
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET B. SONNET C. SAFFRON D. SHALLOT E. TORRENT F. SUGGEST
The odd ones out are obviously A, C, D, E, and F. Therefore, I conclude
that B is not the odd one out.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Ken Blake
2018-08-04 14:59:07 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RHDraney
Been a while since I've posted this, and I'm sure we have new people
http://web.newsguy.com/dadoctah/images/IQTEST.JPG
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
"Sonnet" is the only one without an odd number of letters.
Richard Yates
2018-08-04 15:23:04 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RHDraney
Been a while since I've posted this, and I'm sure we have new people
http://web.newsguy.com/dadoctah/images/IQTEST.JPG
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
"Sonnet" is the only one without an odd number of letters.
But:
STARLET is the only one without consecutive identical letters,
SAFFRON is the only one without a T,
SHALLOT is the only one with an H,
TORRENT is the only one starting with T,
SUGGEST is the only one with a U,
SAFFRON is the only one ending with N,
etc.
etc.
Ken Blake
2018-08-04 18:44:37 UTC
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On Sat, 04 Aug 2018 08:23:04 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RHDraney
Been a while since I've posted this, and I'm sure we have new people
http://web.newsguy.com/dadoctah/images/IQTEST.JPG
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
"Sonnet" is the only one without an odd number of letters.
STARLET is the only one without consecutive identical letters,
SAFFRON is the only one without a T,
SHALLOT is the only one with an H,
TORRENT is the only one starting with T,
SUGGEST is the only one with a U,
SAFFRON is the only one ending with N,
etc.
etc.
Yes, but the question was one about not being the *odd* one out, which
is why I suggested my answer about not having an odd number of
letters.
Richard Yates
2018-08-04 21:00:02 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
On Sat, 04 Aug 2018 08:23:04 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RHDraney
Been a while since I've posted this, and I'm sure we have new people
http://web.newsguy.com/dadoctah/images/IQTEST.JPG
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
"Sonnet" is the only one without an odd number of letters.
STARLET is the only one without consecutive identical letters,
SAFFRON is the only one without a T,
SHALLOT is the only one with an H,
TORRENT is the only one starting with T,
SUGGEST is the only one with a U,
SAFFRON is the only one ending with N,
etc.
etc.
Yes, but the question was one about not being the *odd* one out, which
is why I suggested my answer about not having an odd number of
letters.
Yes, but my point, and possibly Draney's and Tobin's, is that ALL such
puzzles that have no further constraints than "odd one out" or "does
not belong" will inevitably have multiple justifiable answers and no
single, correct one.
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-04 21:06:01 UTC
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On Sat, 04 Aug 2018 14:00:02 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Ken Blake
On Sat, 04 Aug 2018 08:23:04 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RHDraney
Been a while since I've posted this, and I'm sure we have new people
http://web.newsguy.com/dadoctah/images/IQTEST.JPG
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
"Sonnet" is the only one without an odd number of letters.
STARLET is the only one without consecutive identical letters,
SAFFRON is the only one without a T,
SHALLOT is the only one with an H,
TORRENT is the only one starting with T,
SUGGEST is the only one with a U,
SAFFRON is the only one ending with N,
etc.
etc.
Yes, but the question was one about not being the *odd* one out, which
is why I suggested my answer about not having an odd number of
letters.
Yes, but my point, and possibly Draney's and Tobin's, is that ALL such
puzzles that have no further constraints than "odd one out" or "does
not belong" will inevitably have multiple justifiable answers and no
single, correct one.
Esoteric. "Read my mind."

According to Occam's Razor, "TORRENT" is the answer. It is the
simplest solution and the most obvious.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-08-05 13:47:31 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sat, 04 Aug 2018 14:00:02 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Ken Blake
On Sat, 04 Aug 2018 08:23:04 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RHDraney
Been a while since I've posted this, and I'm sure we have new people
http://web.newsguy.com/dadoctah/images/IQTEST.JPG
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
"Sonnet" is the only one without an odd number of letters.
STARLET is the only one without consecutive identical letters,
SAFFRON is the only one without a T,
SHALLOT is the only one with an H,
TORRENT is the only one starting with T,
SUGGEST is the only one with a U,
SAFFRON is the only one ending with N,
etc.
etc.
Yes, but the question was one about not being the *odd* one out, which
is why I suggested my answer about not having an odd number of
letters.
Yes, but my point, and possibly Draney's and Tobin's, is that ALL such
puzzles that have no further constraints than "odd one out" or "does
not belong" will inevitably have multiple justifiable answers and no
single, correct one.
Esoteric. "Read my mind."
According to Occam's Razor, "TORRENT" is the answer. It is the
simplest solution and the most obvious.
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
--
athel
Richard Tobin
2018-08-05 13:53:41 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.

-- Richard
Katy Jennison
2018-08-05 17:39:47 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
--
Katy Jennison
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-08-05 17:47:30 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.

Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain (not for
me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the original
point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s, but it wouldn't
today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in the 1950s.
--
athel
charles
2018-08-05 18:47:49 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain (not for
me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the original
point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s, but it wouldn't
today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in the 1950s.
AH - puss
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-08-05 21:11:59 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain (not for
me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the original
point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s, but it wouldn't
today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in the 1950s.
AH - puss
Right!
--
athel
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-05 23:57:41 UTC
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On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 23:11:59 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain (not for
me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the original
point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s, but it wouldn't
today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in the 1950s.
AH - puss
Right!
Sherlock Damia here.

So "cat" is the correct one that doesn't fit?

If so, that leaves "dog" and "radio"

The connection has to be "His Master's Voice".

Not really familiar with the radio; more so, a gramophone, but radio
is there:

Loading Image...

Also, Irish poet: "His Master's Voice" by Conor O'Callaghan (Richard's
comment).
LFS
2018-08-06 07:48:01 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 23:11:59 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain (not for
me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the original
point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s, but it wouldn't
today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in the 1950s.
AH - puss
Right!
Sherlock Damia here.
So "cat" is the correct one that doesn't fit?
If so, that leaves "dog" and "radio"
The connection has to be "His Master's Voice".
Not really familiar with the radio; more so, a gramophone, but radio
https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KKFNYK/1939-uk-magazine-his-masters-voice-radio-ad-KKFNYK.jpg
Also, Irish poet: "His Master's Voice" by Conor O'Callaghan (Richard's
comment).
Cats whisker, shirley? Links cat and radio. I'm still confused by the
poet bit but it's already quite hot here and my brain doesn't work well
in heat.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
J. J. Lodder
2018-08-06 08:08:23 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 23:11:59 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain (not for
me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the original
point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s, but it wouldn't
today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in the 1950s.
AH - puss
Right!
Sherlock Damia here.
So "cat" is the correct one that doesn't fit?
If so, that leaves "dog" and "radio"
The connection has to be "His Master's Voice".
Not really familiar with the radio; more so, a gramophone, but radio
https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KKFNYK/1939-uk-magazine-his-masters-voice-radio-ad
-KKFNYK.jpg
Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
Also, Irish poet: "His Master's Voice" by Conor O'Callaghan (Richard's
comment).
Cats whisker, shirley? Links cat and radio. I'm still confused by the
poet bit but it's already quite hot here and my brain doesn't work well
in heat.
In those far off days our grandparents knew about
'the howl of the Mexican dog' that hid in their radio,
when mistuned,

Jan
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-06 14:40:06 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 23:11:59 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain (not for
me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the original
point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s, but it wouldn't
today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in the 1950s.
AH - puss
Right!
Sherlock Damia here.
So "cat" is the correct one that doesn't fit?
If so, that leaves "dog" and "radio"
The connection has to be "His Master's Voice".
Not really familiar with the radio; more so, a gramophone, but radio
https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KKFNYK/1939-uk-magazine-his-masters-voice-radio-ad
-KKFNYK.jpg
Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
Also, Irish poet: "His Master's Voice" by Conor O'Callaghan (Richard's
comment).
Cats whisker, shirley? Links cat and radio. I'm still confused by the
poet bit but it's already quite hot here and my brain doesn't work well
in heat.
Had to Google to find out what a "cat whisker" is. Same here, though,
heat wave after heat wave. Very hot even next to the ocean.
Post by Mack A. Damia
In those far off days our grandparents knew about
'the howl of the Mexican dog' that hid in their radio,
when mistuned,
Next to the woofer?
Tony Cooper
2018-08-06 17:58:54 UTC
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On Mon, 06 Aug 2018 07:40:06 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
Had to Google to find out what a "cat whisker" is.
I take you never built a crystal radio using the cardboard tube from a
roll of toilet paper, some copper wire, a crystal, a cat's whisker,
and an earphone.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-06 20:09:34 UTC
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On Mon, 06 Aug 2018 13:58:54 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 06 Aug 2018 07:40:06 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
Had to Google to find out what a "cat whisker" is.
I take you never built a crystal radio using the cardboard tube from a
roll of toilet paper, some copper wire, a crystal, a cat's whisker,
and an earphone.
Never heard of it as far as I can recall.

A friend in high school was the son of an electrician, too, who
followed in daddy's footsteps, and he was an Eagle Scout. Sounds like
something that would be made in Scouting. Maybe I missed that
project. I was always building tree houses when I was a kid.

But I am reading that the "cat's whisker" is merely a springy piece of
thin wire.
J. J. Lodder
2018-08-07 07:31:28 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 23:11:59 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in
the UK in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat,
radio? (The "correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain
(not for me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the
original point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s,
but it wouldn't today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in
the 1950s.
AH - puss
Right!
Sherlock Damia here.
So "cat" is the correct one that doesn't fit?
If so, that leaves "dog" and "radio"
The connection has to be "His Master's Voice".
Not really familiar with the radio; more so, a gramophone, but radio
https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KKFNYK/1939-uk-magazine-his-masters-voice-radio
-ad
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
-KKFNYK.jpg
Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
Also, Irish poet: "His Master's Voice" by Conor O'Callaghan (Richard's
comment).
Cats whisker, shirley? Links cat and radio. I'm still confused by the
poet bit but it's already quite hot here and my brain doesn't work well
in heat.
Had to Google to find out what a "cat whisker" is. Same here, though,
heat wave after heat wave. Very hot even next to the ocean.
Post by Mack A. Damia
In those far off days our grandparents knew about
'the howl of the Mexican dog' that hid in their radio,
when mistuned,
Next to the woofer?
Perhaps. For some reason the whiner has never been invented.
I don't know if English has a word for the Mexican Dog.
Some pre-WWII radio sets used positive feedback
to increase amplification. There was a knob to control it.
Too much feedback, and the thing went unstable and became a transmitter.
This caused the 'Mexican Dog' whining sounds in other sets all around,

Jan
Snidely
2018-08-07 09:47:56 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 23:11:59 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in
the UK in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat,
radio? (The "correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain
(not for me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the
original point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s,
but it wouldn't today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in
the 1950s.
AH - puss
Right!
Sherlock Damia here.
So "cat" is the correct one that doesn't fit?
If so, that leaves "dog" and "radio"
The connection has to be "His Master's Voice".
Not really familiar with the radio; more so, a gramophone, but radio
https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KKFNYK/1939-uk-magazine-his-masters-voice-radio
-ad -KKFNYK.jpg
Also, Irish poet: "His Master's Voice" by Conor O'Callaghan (Richard's
comment).
Cats whisker, shirley? Links cat and radio. I'm still confused by the
poet bit but it's already quite hot here and my brain doesn't work well
in heat.
Had to Google to find out what a "cat whisker" is. Same here, though,
heat wave after heat wave. Very hot even next to the ocean.
Post by J. J. Lodder
In those far off days our grandparents knew about
'the howl of the Mexican dog' that hid in their radio,
when mistuned,
Next to the woofer?
Perhaps. For some reason the whiner has never been invented.
I don't know if English has a word for the Mexican Dog.
The dog? A Chihuahua, after the Mexican state.
Post by J. J. Lodder
Some pre-WWII radio sets used positive feedback
to increase amplification.
Regenerative amplifier, or regenerative radio.
Post by J. J. Lodder
There was a knob to control it.
Too much feedback, and the thing went unstable and became a transmitter.
This caused the 'Mexican Dog' whining sounds in other sets all around,
Heterodyne IF stages can transmit, too, although I think they are
easier to shield. The coupling transformer is small and easily
shielded [I may have just dated myself, as coupling in an IC-based
radio is probably not via transformers].

/dps
--
Trust, but verify.
Snidely
2018-08-07 09:48:27 UTC
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Post by Snidely
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 23:11:59 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in
the UK in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat,
radio? (The "correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain
(not for me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the
original point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s,
but it wouldn't today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in
the 1950s.
AH - puss
Right!
Sherlock Damia here.
So "cat" is the correct one that doesn't fit?
If so, that leaves "dog" and "radio"
The connection has to be "His Master's Voice".
Not really familiar with the radio; more so, a gramophone, but radio
https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KKFNYK/1939-uk-magazine-his-masters-voice-radio
-ad -KKFNYK.jpg
Also, Irish poet: "His Master's Voice" by Conor O'Callaghan (Richard's
comment).
Cats whisker, shirley? Links cat and radio. I'm still confused by the
poet bit but it's already quite hot here and my brain doesn't work well
in heat.
Had to Google to find out what a "cat whisker" is. Same here, though,
heat wave after heat wave. Very hot even next to the ocean.
Post by J. J. Lodder
In those far off days our grandparents knew about
'the howl of the Mexican dog' that hid in their radio,
when mistuned,
Next to the woofer?
Perhaps. For some reason the whiner has never been invented.
I don't know if English has a word for the Mexican Dog.
The dog? A Chihuahua, after the Mexican state.
Post by J. J. Lodder
Some pre-WWII radio sets used positive feedback
to increase amplification.
Regenerative amplifier, or regenerative radio.
Post by J. J. Lodder
There was a knob to control it.
Too much feedback, and the thing went unstable and became a transmitter.
This caused the 'Mexican Dog' whining sounds in other sets all around,
"Howl".
Post by Snidely
Heterodyne IF stages can transmit, too, although I think they are easier to
shield. The coupling transformer is small and easily shielded [I may have
just dated myself, as coupling in an IC-based radio is probably not via
transformers].
/dps
--
"What do you think of my cart, Miss Morland? A neat one, is not it?
Well hung: curricle-hung in fact. Come sit by me and we'll test the
springs."
(Speculative fiction by H.Lacedaemonian.)
Peter Moylan
2018-08-07 10:08:55 UTC
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Some pre-WWII radio sets used positive feedback to increase
amplification. There was a knob to control it. Too much feedback, and
the thing went unstable and became a transmitter.
Although nobody realised it at the time, this was an important
contribution to the development of modern automatic control theory.
Eventually someone (in Bell Labs) figured out that you get
better-quality electronic amplifiers if you use _negative_ feedback to
_decrease_ amplification. This was in the context of trying to design
better amplifiers for telephone exchanges.

Negative feedback good. Positive feedback bad. Unless you're a psychologist.

A result of my own of which I'm proud was the discovery that a feedback
controller is optimal, in a certain sense, if the feedback is negative
for all inputs.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Sam Plusnet
2018-08-06 19:50:49 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 23:11:59 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain (not for
me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the original
point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s, but it wouldn't
today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in the 1950s.
AH  - puss
Right!
Sherlock Damia here.
So "cat" is the correct one that doesn't fit?
If so, that leaves "dog" and "radio"
The connection has to be "His Master's Voice".
Not really familiar with the radio; more so, a gramophone, but radio
https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KKFNYK/1939-uk-magazine-his-masters-voice-radio-ad-KKFNYK.jpg
Also, Irish poet: "His Master's Voice" by Conor O'Callaghan (Richard's
comment).
Cats whisker, shirley? Links cat and radio. I'm still confused by the
poet bit but it's already quite hot here and my brain doesn't work well
in heat.
Ignore them all, for they are being licentious.
--
Sam Plusnet
Jerry Friedman
2018-08-07 00:12:56 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 23:11:59 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain (not for
me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the original
point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s, but it wouldn't
today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in the 1950s.
AH  - puss
Right!
Sherlock Damia here.
So "cat" is the correct one that doesn't fit?
If so, that leaves "dog" and "radio"
The connection has to be "His Master's Voice".
Not really familiar with the radio; more so, a gramophone, but radio
https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KKFNYK/1939-uk-magazine-his-masters-voice-radio-ad-KKFNYK.jpg
Also, Irish poet: "His Master's Voice" by Conor O'Callaghan (Richard's
comment).
Cats whisker, shirley? Links cat and radio. I'm still confused by the
poet bit but it's already quite hot here and my brain doesn't work
well in heat.
Ignore them all, for they are being licentious.
Ah...
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter Moylan
2018-08-07 01:00:58 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 23:11:59 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by charles
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain (not for
me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the original
point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s, but it wouldn't
today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in the 1950s.
AH - puss
Right!
Sherlock Damia here.
So "cat" is the correct one that doesn't fit?
If so, that leaves "dog" and "radio"
The connection has to be "His Master's Voice".
Not really familiar with the radio; more so, a gramophone, but radio
https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KKFNYK/1939-uk-magazine-his-masters-voice-radio-ad-KKFNYK.jpg
Also, Irish poet: "His Master's Voice" by Conor O'Callaghan (Richard's
comment).
Cats whisker, shirley? Links cat and radio. I'm still confused by the
poet bit but it's already quite hot here and my brain doesn't work
well in heat.
Ignore them all, for they are being licentious.
Ah...
It also took me that long to figure it out. Well, truth be told, I
didn't figure it out at all, because Sam's clue came first.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
RHDraney
2018-08-07 07:11:25 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 23:11:59 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain (not for
me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the original
point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s, but it wouldn't
today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in the 1950s.
AH  - puss
Right!
Sherlock Damia here.
So "cat" is the correct one that doesn't fit?
If so, that leaves "dog" and "radio"
The connection has to be "His Master's Voice".
Not really familiar with the radio; more so, a gramophone, but radio
https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KKFNYK/1939-uk-magazine-his-masters-voice-radio-ad-KKFNYK.jpg
Also, Irish poet: "His Master's Voice" by Conor O'Callaghan (Richard's
comment).
Cats whisker, shirley? Links cat and radio. I'm still confused by the
poet bit but it's already quite hot here and my brain doesn't work
well in heat.
Ignore them all, for they are being licentious.
Ah...
It also took me that long to figure it out. Well, truth be told, I
didn't figure it out at all, because Sam's clue came first.
It was the dropping of the same shoe that did it for me as well....

(Can I just add that I genuinely miss the SDC?)...r
Snidely
2018-08-07 09:50:49 UTC
Reply
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Post by RHDraney
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 23:11:59 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain (not for
me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the original
point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s, but it wouldn't
today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in the 1950s.
AH  - puss
Right!
Sherlock Damia here.
So "cat" is the correct one that doesn't fit?
If so, that leaves "dog" and "radio"
The connection has to be "His Master's Voice".
Not really familiar with the radio; more so, a gramophone, but radio
https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KKFNYK/1939-uk-magazine-his-masters-voice-radio-ad-KKFNYK.jpg
Also, Irish poet: "His Master's Voice" by Conor O'Callaghan (Richard's
comment).
Cats whisker, shirley? Links cat and radio. I'm still confused by the
poet bit but it's already quite hot here and my brain doesn't work
well in heat.
Ignore them all, for they are being licentious.
Ah...
It also took me that long to figure it out. Well, truth be told, I didn't
figure it out at all, because Sam's clue came first.
It was the dropping of the same shoe that did it for me as well....
(Can I just add that I genuinely miss the SDC?)...r
I enjoyed it even when I didn't understand the answers (much less come
up with answers). But I can see that it's a lot of work to come up
with a reasonable set of questions, and IIRC it took a team.

/dps
--
The presence of this syntax results from the fact that SQLite is really
a Tcl extension that has escaped into the wild.
<http://www.sqlite.org/lang_expr.html>
RHDraney
2018-08-07 11:05:55 UTC
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Post by Snidely
Post by RHDraney
(Can I just add that I genuinely miss the SDC?)...r
I enjoyed it even when I didn't understand the answers (much less come
up with answers).  But I can see that it's a lot of work to come up with
a reasonable set of questions, and IIRC it took a team.
I contributed a few questions back in the day...it'd be harder to
Google-proof them now that Google Image Search allows you to simply drag
and drop the picture into the search window and let the nice folks at
Alphabet look it up for you....r
LFS
2018-08-07 14:51:23 UTC
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Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 23:11:59 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain (not for
me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the original
point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s, but it wouldn't
today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in the 1950s.
AH  - puss
Right!
Sherlock Damia here.
So "cat" is the correct one that doesn't fit?
If so, that leaves "dog" and "radio"
The connection has to be "His Master's Voice".
Not really familiar with the radio; more so, a gramophone, but radio
https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KKFNYK/1939-uk-magazine-his-masters-voice-radio-ad-KKFNYK.jpg
Also, Irish poet: "His Master's Voice" by Conor O'Callaghan (Richard's
comment).
Cats whisker, shirley? Links cat and radio. I'm still confused by the
poet bit but it's already quite hot here and my brain doesn't work
well in heat.
Ignore them all, for they are being licentious.
Ah, thank you!
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-07 20:50:26 UTC
Reply
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Post by LFS
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 5 Aug 2018 23:11:59 +0200, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
There was said to be an intelligence test given to children in the UK
in the 1950s: which is the odd one out of dog, cat, radio? (The
"correct" answer was not radio.)
It would have been clearer if they'd added "poet" to the list.
<like>
You obviously got it, but I didn't, alas.
Ah, light has dawned while I was typing this, so don't explain (not for
me, anyway). Richard, and probably you, obviously got the original
point, which would have worked in the UK in the 1950s, but it wouldn't
today, and it wouldn't have worked in the USA in the 1950s.
AH  - puss
Right!
Sherlock Damia here.
So "cat" is the correct one that doesn't fit?
If so, that leaves "dog" and "radio"
The connection has to be "His Master's Voice".
Not really familiar with the radio; more so, a gramophone, but radio
https://c8.alamy.com/comp/KKFNYK/1939-uk-magazine-his-masters-voice-radio-ad-KKFNYK.jpg
Also, Irish poet: "His Master's Voice" by Conor O'Callaghan (Richard's
comment).
Cats whisker, shirley? Links cat and radio. I'm still confused by the
poet bit but it's already quite hot here and my brain doesn't work
well in heat.
Ignore them all, for they are being licentious.
Ah, thank you!
Rather obvious, too. Making the problem more difficult than it really
is, considering the test was for children.

Ken Blake
2018-08-04 21:52:59 UTC
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On Sat, 04 Aug 2018 14:00:02 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Ken Blake
On Sat, 04 Aug 2018 08:23:04 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RHDraney
Been a while since I've posted this, and I'm sure we have new people
http://web.newsguy.com/dadoctah/images/IQTEST.JPG
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
"Sonnet" is the only one without an odd number of letters.
STARLET is the only one without consecutive identical letters,
SAFFRON is the only one without a T,
SHALLOT is the only one with an H,
TORRENT is the only one starting with T,
SUGGEST is the only one with a U,
SAFFRON is the only one ending with N,
etc.
etc.
Yes, but the question was one about not being the *odd* one out, which
is why I suggested my answer about not having an odd number of
letters.
Yes, but my point, and possibly Draney's and Tobin's, is that ALL such
puzzles that have no further constraints than "odd one out" or "does
not belong" will inevitably have multiple justifiable answers and no
single, correct one.
You are, of course, correct.
HVS
2018-08-05 09:55:55 UTC
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Post by Richard Yates
Post by Ken Blake
On Sat, 04 Aug 2018 08:23:04 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RHDraney
Been a while since I've posted this, and I'm sure we have new people
http://web.newsguy.com/dadoctah/images/IQTEST.JPG
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
"Sonnet" is the only one without an odd number of letters.
STARLET is the only one without consecutive identical letters,
SAFFRON is the only one without a T,
SHALLOT is the only one with an H,
TORRENT is the only one starting with T,
SUGGEST is the only one with a U,
SAFFRON is the only one ending with N,
etc.
etc.
Yes, but the question was one about not being the *odd* one out, which
is why I suggested my answer about not having an odd number of
letters.
Yes, but my point, and possibly Draney's and Tobin's, is that ALL such
puzzles that have no further constraints than "odd one out" or "does
not belong" will inevitably have multiple justifiable answers and no
single, correct one.
Posters seem to assume that "odd one out" refers to one of the words; if
this is a cryptic clue, that's falling for the surface meaning (the mis-
direction) rather than the cryptic one.

Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?

A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST

If you remove every other letter (the odd letters) from one of the words,
you're left with an anagram of "not" -- that is, the letters for "not",
rather than the word itself (which tells you they're "out").

Remove S-N-E from "SONNET"; you're left with "O-N-T", which is an anagram
(pointed to by "out") of "NOT".

If that *is* what's meant, the clue isn't particularly well constructed,
but that may be what they're up to.
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng (30yrs) and BrEng (34yrs), indiscriminately mixed
HVS
2018-08-05 10:01:38 UTC
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On 05 Aug 2018, HVS wrote

-snip duplicate-

Sorry for the duplicate post; not sure what happened there.

I've tried to cancel one of them, but that doesn't always workss.
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng (30yrs) and BrEng (34yrs), indiscriminately mixed
Jerry Friedman
2018-08-05 23:48:37 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
On Sat, 04 Aug 2018 08:23:04 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RHDraney
Been a while since I've posted this, and I'm sure we have new people
http://web.newsguy.com/dadoctah/images/IQTEST.JPG
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
"Sonnet" is the only one without an odd number of letters.
STARLET is the only one without consecutive identical letters,
SAFFRON is the only one without a T,
SHALLOT is the only one with an H,
TORRENT is the only one starting with T,
SUGGEST is the only one with a U,
SAFFRON is the only one ending with N,
etc.
etc.
Yes, but the question was one about not being the *odd* one out, which
is why I suggested my answer about not having an odd number of
letters.
By the way, I don't think "odd one out" is a common enough phrase in
America to put in a question for children. On /Sesame Street/ they sing
or sang, "One of these things is not like the others, One of the these
things does not belong."

(I assume the above question is a parody of questions put to children.)
--
Jerry Friedman
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-04 15:24:43 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by RHDraney
Been a while since I've posted this, and I'm sure we have new people
http://web.newsguy.com/dadoctah/images/IQTEST.JPG
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
"Sonnet" is the only one without an odd number of letters.
All have seven letter except 'SONNET'.

All have a double letter in the middle except 'STARLET'.

All are nouns except 'SUGGEST'.

All begin with 'S' and end with a 'T' except 'TORRENT' and 'SAFFRON'.

Therefore, 'SAFFRON' is not the odd one out.
Richard Tobin
2018-08-04 17:11:30 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Tobin
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
"Sonnet" is the only one without an odd number of letters.
All have seven letter except 'SONNET'.
All have a double letter in the middle except 'STARLET'.
All are nouns except 'SUGGEST'.
All begin with 'S' and end with a 'T' except 'TORRENT' and 'SAFFRON'.
Yes, but...
Post by Mack A. Damia
Therefore, 'SAFFRON' is not the odd one out.
I think you typed the wrong word!

-- Richard
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-04 17:26:24 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Tobin
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
"Sonnet" is the only one without an odd number of letters.
All have seven letter except 'SONNET'.
All have a double letter in the middle except 'STARLET'.
All are nouns except 'SUGGEST'.
All begin with 'S' and end with a 'T' except 'TORRENT' and 'SAFFRON'.
Yes, but...
Post by Mack A. Damia
Therefore, 'SAFFRON' is not the odd one out.
I think you typed the wrong word!
SEVEN DOUBLE NOUNS S-T
LETTERS LETTER

STARLET X

SONNET X

SAFFRON X

SHALLOT

TORRENT X

SUGGEST X

The only one without an 'X' is "SHALLOT"; therefore, it is not the odd
one out.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-04 17:51:08 UTC
Reply
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Tobin
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
"Sonnet" is the only one without an odd number of letters.
All have seven letter except 'SONNET'.
All have a double letter in the middle except 'STARLET'.
All are nouns except 'SUGGEST'.
All begin with 'S' and end with a 'T' except 'TORRENT' and 'SAFFRON'.
Yes, but...
Post by Mack A. Damia
Therefore, 'SAFFRON' is not the odd one out.
I think you typed the wrong word!
SEVEN DOUBLE NOUNS S-T
LETTERS LETTER
STARLET X
SONNET X
SAFFRON X
SHALLOT
TORRENT X
SUGGEST X
The only one without an 'X' is "SHALLOT"; therefore, it is not the odd
one out.
Typical Damia "honesty." He left the X off under "nouns S-T" for SHALLOT,
and claimed that because of his mistake, it differs from the others.
Richard Tobin
2018-08-04 19:10:42 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Typical Damia "honesty." He left the X off under "nouns S-T" for SHALLOT,
and claimed that because of his mistake, it differs from the others.
That column had words that were the odd one out because they either
don't end with T (SAFFRON) or don't start with S (TORRENT). So he
was correct not to put SHALLOT there.

-- Richard
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-05 02:51:39 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Typical Damia "honesty." He left the X off under "nouns S-T" for SHALLOT,
and claimed that because of his mistake, it differs from the others.
That column had words that were the odd one out because they either
don't end with T (SAFFRON) or don't start with S (TORRENT). So he
was correct not to put SHALLOT there.
Is that how you interpret "nouns S-T"? But in the very next message,
SHALLOT had somehow acquired no fewer than four Xs!
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-04 18:06:57 UTC
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On Sat, 04 Aug 2018 10:26:24 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Tobin
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
"Sonnet" is the only one without an odd number of letters.
All have seven letter except 'SONNET'.
All have a double letter in the middle except 'STARLET'.
All are nouns except 'SUGGEST'.
All begin with 'S' and end with a 'T' except 'TORRENT' and 'SAFFRON'.
Yes, but...
Post by Mack A. Damia
Therefore, 'SAFFRON' is not the odd one out.
I think you typed the wrong word!
SEVEN DOUBLE NOUNS S-T
LETTERS LETTER

STARLET X X X

SONNET X X X

SAFFRON X X X
SHALLOT X X X X

TORRENT X X X
SUGGEST X X X

This works out better. "SHALLOT" is the only one that contains all
four exceptions; therefore it is not the odd one out.
Mack A. Damia
2018-08-04 17:32:02 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Ken Blake
Post by Richard Tobin
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
"Sonnet" is the only one without an odd number of letters.
All have seven letter except 'SONNET'.
All have a double letter in the middle except 'STARLET'.
All are nouns except 'SUGGEST'.
All begin with 'S' and end with a 'T' except 'TORRENT' and 'SAFFRON'.
Yes, but...
Post by Mack A. Damia
Therefore, 'SAFFRON' is not the odd one out.
I think you typed the wrong word!
Indeed.

I may be smart, but I am not perfect.
Richard Tobin
2018-08-04 17:41:56 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
I may be smart, but I am not perfect.
That's probably good enough for GCHQ.

-- Richard
RHDraney
2018-08-05 00:06:32 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Q1. Which of these is not the odd one out?
A. STARLET
B. SONNET
C. SAFFRON
D. SHALLOT
E. TORRENT
F. SUGGEST
ObCheers: I have never had a starlet in my kitchen....r
John Varela
2018-08-03 22:06:30 UTC
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Post by RHDraney
We had one come up at trivia this week...this wasn't the actual
Q: Sphere is to circle as _________ is to square.
A: Pyramid
B: Prism
C: Cylinder
D: Cube
E: Cone
A group *not* made up of MENSA members would probably answer D (a form
of the analogy in the actual quiz question)...I contend that C is
actually a more accurate answer, and can easily make a solid (heh!) case
for A as well....r
C

If you rotate a circle about one of its diameters, you get a sphere.
If you rotate a square about a line connecting the centers of two
opposite sides, you get a cylinder of height equal to a side of the
square.

QED
--
John Varela
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