Discussion:
nomination as/nomination for
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a***@gmail.com
2018-08-09 07:06:00 UTC
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1) He was excited about his nomination for the next president of our association.
2) He was excited about his nomination as the next president of our association.

3) He withdrew from nomination for the next president of our association.
4) He withdrew from nomination as the next president of our association.


Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?


Gratefully,
Navi
Harrison Hill
2018-08-09 07:31:05 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He was excited about his nomination for the next president of our association.
2) He was excited about his nomination as the next president of our association.
3) He withdrew from nomination for the next president of our association.
4) He withdrew from nomination as the next president of our association.
Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?
They are all grammatical, idiomatic and natural to my
ear. Less formal than:

...from nomination TO BE the next president...
...from nomination TO BECOME the next president...
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-08-09 11:06:50 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He was excited about his nomination for the next president of our association.
2) He was excited about his nomination as the next president of our association.
3) He withdrew from nomination for the next president of our association.
4) He withdrew from nomination as the next president of our association.
Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?
They are all grammatical, idiomatic and natural to my
...from nomination TO BE the next president...
...from nomination TO BECOME the next president...
Less formal and by consequence ambiguous. One's nomination *for*
an election is usually someone other than yourself! All uncertainty
should be eliminated by replacing "his nomination for" with "being
nominated for".
Peter T. Daniels
2018-08-09 11:32:19 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He was excited about his nomination for the next president of our association.
2) He was excited about his nomination as the next president of our association.
3) He withdrew from nomination for the next president of our association.
4) He withdrew from nomination as the next president of our association.
Which are grammatical?
Which are idiomatic?
All are wrong.

"nomination as president" or (better) "nomination for the presidency"

"rejected the nomination" or "withdrew his candidacy"
Jack
2018-08-10 00:39:25 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He was excited about his nomination for the next president of our association.
2) He was excited about his nomination as the next president of our association.
3) He withdrew from nomination for the next president of our association.
4) He withdrew from nomination as the next president of our association.
'As' implies an appointment (a settled matter), while 'for' implies a
proposal.

If it's an elected position, I would say nominated FOR X, or nominated
AS a candidate for X.

AHD definition 1: To propose as a candidate in an election or as one
to be considered for an honor or prize: nominated him as their
candidate for mayor; was nominated twice for an Academy Award.
--
John
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-08-10 06:58:06 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) He was excited about his nomination for the next president of our association.
2) He was excited about his nomination as the next president of our association.
3) He withdrew from nomination for the next president of our association.
4) He withdrew from nomination as the next president of our association.
Which are grammatical?
All
Post by a***@gmail.com
Which are idiomatic?
All
--
athel
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