Discussion:
We come on the Sloop John B
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Harrison Hill
2018-07-09 17:06:00 UTC
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Estuary English doesn't recognise "came", and would always
reply:

"How did you get here?"
"We come on the bus".

How about:

"We come on the Sloop John B..."?
Ken Blake
2018-07-09 18:28:45 UTC
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On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 10:06:00 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
<***@gmail.com> wrote:

>Estuary English doesn't recognise "came", and would always
>reply:
>
>"How did you get here?"
>"We come on the bus".
>
>How about:
>
>"We come on the Sloop John B..."?


"Come" might be meant as a past tense in that song, but it also could
be present tense. We are coming on the sloop John B.
David Kleinecke
2018-07-09 20:45:46 UTC
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On Monday, July 9, 2018 at 12:14:27 PM UTC-7, Ken Blake wrote:
> On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 10:06:00 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
> <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >Estuary English doesn't recognise "came", and would always
> >reply:
> >
> >"How did you get here?"
> >"We come on the bus".
> >
> >How about:
> >
> >"We come on the Sloop John B..."?
>
>
> "Come" might be meant as a past tense in that song, but it also could
> be present tense. We are coming on the sloop John B.

I learned the song with "came" but "come" sounds OK to
me as Caribbean English.

From memory:

We came on the sloop John B.
My grandfather and me.
Round Nassau town we did roam
I feel so break up
I wanna go home.
Richard Tobin
2018-07-09 20:50:31 UTC
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In article <8e4a0a36-b48b-4af9-ad1d-***@googlegroups.com>,
David Kleinecke <***@gmail.com> wrote:

>I learned the song with "came" but "come" sounds OK to
>me as Caribbean English.
>
>From memory:
>
>We came on the sloop John B.
>My grandfather and me.
>Round Nassau town we did roam
>I feel so break up
>I wanna go home.

If you're happy with "break up" then it would be strange to
object to "come".

-- Richard
David Kleinecke
2018-07-09 21:20:28 UTC
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On Monday, July 9, 2018 at 1:55:02 PM UTC-7, Richard Tobin wrote:
> In article <8e4a0a36-b48b-4af9-ad1d-***@googlegroups.com>,
> David Kleinecke <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>
> >I learned the song with "came" but "come" sounds OK to
> >me as Caribbean English.
> >
> >From memory:
> >
> >We came on the sloop John B.
> >My grandfather and me.
> >Round Nassau town we did roam
> >I feel so break up
> >I wanna go home.
>
> If you're happy with "break up" then it would be strange to
> object to "come".

I have no idea what "break up" means in Nassau but it is an
OK English idiom regardless. A song is a song.
Richard Tobin
2018-07-10 09:19:16 UTC
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In article <bf37cf80-2b14-4dc3-851a-***@googlegroups.com>,
David Kleinecke <***@gmail.com> wrote:

>> >I learned the song with "came" but "come" sounds OK to
>> >me as Caribbean English.
>> >
>> >From memory:
>> >
>> >We came on the sloop John B.
>> >My grandfather and me.
>> >Round Nassau town we did roam
>> >I feel so break up
>> >I wanna go home.

>> If you're happy with "break up" then it would be strange to
>> object to "come".

>I have no idea what "break up" means in Nassau but it is an
>OK English idiom regardless. A song is a song.

It's the present tense of "broken up". Many versions of the lyrics
have "broke up".

-- Richard
HVS
2018-07-10 10:02:52 UTC
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On 10 Jul 2018, Richard Tobin wrote

> In article <bf37cf80-2b14-4dc3-851a-***@googlegroups.com>,
> David Kleinecke <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>>>> I learned the song with "came" but "come" sounds OK to
>>>> me as Caribbean English.
>>>>
>>>> From memory:
>>>>
>>>> We came on the sloop John B.
>>>> My grandfather and me.
>>>> Round Nassau town we did roam
>>>> I feel so break up
>>>> I wanna go home.
>
>>> If you're happy with "break up" then it would be strange to
>>> object to "come".
>
>> I have no idea what "break up" means in Nassau but it is an
>> OK English idiom regardless. A song is a song.
>
> It's the present tense of "broken up". Many versions of the lyrics
> have "broke up".

"We come on the sloop John B" and "I feel so broke up" is what I've always
thought it was from when I first heard the song. (Beach Boys version.)

--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng (30yrs) and BrEng (34yrs), indiscriminately mixed
Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2018-07-09 21:16:31 UTC
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David Kleinecke wrote:
>
> We came on the sloop John B.
> My grandfather and me.
> Round Nassau town we did roam
> I feel so break up
> I wanna go home.
>
Day-o, day-o
Daylight come and me wan' go home.

--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
Peter Moylan
2018-07-09 23:34:00 UTC
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On 10/07/18 07:16, Reinhold {Rey} Aman wrote:
> David Kleinecke wrote:
>>
>> We came on the sloop John B.
>> My grandfather and me.
>> Round Nassau town we did roam
>> I feel so break up
>> I wanna go home.
>>
> Day-o, day-o
> Daylight come and me wan' go home.

Come, Mister Taliban,
Tally me banana.

--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Harrison Hill
2018-07-10 10:21:24 UTC
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On Tuesday, 10 July 2018 00:34:04 UTC+1, Peter Moylan wrote:
> On 10/07/18 07:16, Reinhold {Rey} Aman wrote:
> > David Kleinecke wrote:
> >>
> >> We came on the sloop John B.
> >> My grandfather and me.
> >> Round Nassau town we did roam
> >> I feel so break up
> >> I wanna go home.
> >>
> > Day-o, day-o
> > Daylight come and me wan' go home.
>
> Come, Mister Taliban,
> Tally me banana.

Is that a mondegreen or the Afghan version?
RH Draney
2018-07-09 21:45:01 UTC
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On 7/9/2018 11:28 AM, Ken Blake wrote:
> On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 10:06:00 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
> <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>> Estuary English doesn't recognise "came", and would always
>> reply:
>>
>> "How did you get here?"
>> "We come on the bus".
>>
>> How about:
>>
>> "We come on the Sloop John B..."?
>
>
> "Come" might be meant as a past tense in that song, but it also could
> be present tense. We are coming on the sloop John B.

Weren't we informed by a past regular that Choctaw tends to express all
thoughts in the present tense?...r
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-07-09 22:47:43 UTC
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On Monday, 9 July 2018 22:45:51 UTC+1, RH Draney wrote:
> On 7/9/2018 11:28 AM, Ken Blake wrote:
> > On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 10:06:00 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
> > <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> >
> >> Estuary English doesn't recognise "came", and would always
> >> reply:
> >>
> >> "How did you get here?"
> >> "We come on the bus".
> >>
> >> How about:
> >>
> >> "We come on the Sloop John B..."?
> >
> >
> > "Come" might be meant as a past tense in that song, but it also could
> > be present tense. We are coming on the sloop John B.
>
> Weren't we informed by a past regular that Choctaw tends to express all
> thoughts in the present tense?...r

As do English footballers!
Mack A. Damia
2018-07-10 00:38:55 UTC
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On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 14:45:01 -0700, RH Draney <***@cox.net> wrote:

>On 7/9/2018 11:28 AM, Ken Blake wrote:
>> On Mon, 9 Jul 2018 10:06:00 -0700 (PDT), Harrison Hill
>> <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>>
>>> Estuary English doesn't recognise "came", and would always
>>> reply:
>>>
>>> "How did you get here?"
>>> "We come on the bus".
>>>
>>> How about:
>>>
>>> "We come on the Sloop John B..."?
>>
>>
>> "Come" might be meant as a past tense in that song, but it also could
>> be present tense. We are coming on the sloop John B.
>
>Weren't we informed by a past regular that Choctaw tends to express all
>thoughts in the present tense?...r

I guess you know the tune:

Oh Lord, stuck in Lodi again.
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