Discussion:
"to touch hands"
(too old to reply)
Stefan Ram
2018-07-01 08:37:01 UTC
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*** The following text might be something ***
*** that sensitive minds want to avoid! ***

I read on a Web page:

|It became one of the first self-service items in American
|retailing history after it was strategically placed on
|countertops with a special payment box so that the woman
|didn't have to ask a clerk for it and touch hands.
en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kotex&oldid=839205839

. What does "touch hands" mean here?

Does it mean that the woman does not have to touch the hands
of a clerk? She surely still has to touch the product!
Tony Cooper
2018-07-01 11:39:40 UTC
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On 1 Jul 2018 08:37:01 GMT, ***@zedat.fu-berlin.de (Stefan Ram) wrote:

> *** The following text might be something ***
> *** that sensitive minds want to avoid! ***
>
> I read on a Web page:
>
>|It became one of the first self-service items in American
>|retailing history after it was strategically placed on
>|countertops with a special payment box so that the woman
>|didn't have to ask a clerk for it and touch hands.
>en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kotex&oldid=839205839
>
> . What does "touch hands" mean here?
>
> Does it mean that the woman does not have to touch the hands
> of a clerk? She surely still has to touch the product!

The product is Kotex sanitary pads. There might be some aversion on
the part of a shop clerk to being touched by a woman who is
menstruating. It is the clerk, not the product, that doesn't want to
be touched.

That phrase, "sanitary pads", has always annoyed me. The product
isn't any more or less sanitary than any other packaged product.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-07-01 12:16:24 UTC
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On Sun, 01 Jul 2018 07:39:40 -0400, Tony Cooper
<***@gmail.com> wrote:

>On 1 Jul 2018 08:37:01 GMT, ***@zedat.fu-berlin.de (Stefan Ram) wrote:
>
>> *** The following text might be something ***
>> *** that sensitive minds want to avoid! ***
>>
>> I read on a Web page:
>>
>>|It became one of the first self-service items in American
>>|retailing history after it was strategically placed on
>>|countertops with a special payment box so that the woman
>>|didn't have to ask a clerk for it and touch hands.
>>en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kotex&oldid=839205839
>>
>> . What does "touch hands" mean here?
>>
>> Does it mean that the woman does not have to touch the hands
>> of a clerk? She surely still has to touch the product!
>
>The product is Kotex sanitary pads. There might be some aversion on
>the part of a shop clerk to being touched by a woman who is
>menstruating. It is the clerk, not the product, that doesn't want to
>be touched.
>
>That phrase, "sanitary pads", has always annoyed me. The product
>isn't any more or less sanitary than any other packaged product.

I think "sanitary" is used to mean the item is used for sanitary
purposes.

--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Tony Cooper
2018-07-01 12:27:34 UTC
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On Sun, 01 Jul 2018 13:16:24 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
<***@peterduncanson.net> wrote:

>On Sun, 01 Jul 2018 07:39:40 -0400, Tony Cooper
><***@gmail.com> wrote:
>
>>On 1 Jul 2018 08:37:01 GMT, ***@zedat.fu-berlin.de (Stefan Ram) wrote:
>>
>>> *** The following text might be something ***
>>> *** that sensitive minds want to avoid! ***
>>>
>>> I read on a Web page:
>>>
>>>|It became one of the first self-service items in American
>>>|retailing history after it was strategically placed on
>>>|countertops with a special payment box so that the woman
>>>|didn't have to ask a clerk for it and touch hands.
>>>en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kotex&oldid=839205839
>>>
>>> . What does "touch hands" mean here?
>>>
>>> Does it mean that the woman does not have to touch the hands
>>> of a clerk? She surely still has to touch the product!
>>
>>The product is Kotex sanitary pads. There might be some aversion on
>>the part of a shop clerk to being touched by a woman who is
>>menstruating. It is the clerk, not the product, that doesn't want to
>>be touched.
>>
>>That phrase, "sanitary pads", has always annoyed me. The product
>>isn't any more or less sanitary than any other packaged product.
>
>I think "sanitary" is used to mean the item is used for sanitary
>purposes.

Yes, I know that. But hand soap and toilet paper are items used for
sanitary purposes. We don't see "Sanitary toilet paper", in the
store.

Kotex pads are also referred to as "sanitary napkins". That's even
worse.

--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2018-07-01 12:37:14 UTC
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On Sunday, July 1, 2018 at 8:27:37 AM UTC-4, Tony Cooper wrote:
> On Sun, 01 Jul 2018 13:16:24 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
> <***@peterduncanson.net> wrote:
> >On Sun, 01 Jul 2018 07:39:40 -0400, Tony Cooper
> ><***@gmail.com> wrote:
> >>On 1 Jul 2018 08:37:01 GMT, ***@zedat.fu-berlin.de (Stefan Ram) wrote:

> >>> *** The following text might be something ***
> >>> *** that sensitive minds want to avoid! ***

Good grief.

> >>> I read on a Web page:
> >>>|It became one of the first self-service items in American
> >>>|retailing history after it was strategically placed on
> >>>|countertops with a special payment box so that the woman
> >>>|didn't have to ask a clerk for it and touch hands.
> >>>en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kotex&oldid=839205839
> >>> . What does "touch hands" mean here?
> >>> Does it mean that the woman does not have to touch the hands
> >>> of a clerk? She surely still has to touch the product!
> >>The product is Kotex sanitary pads. There might be some aversion on
> >>the part of a shop clerk to being touched by a woman who is
> >>menstruating. It is the clerk, not the product, that doesn't want to
> >>be touched.
> >>That phrase, "sanitary pads", has always annoyed me. The product
> >>isn't any more or less sanitary than any other packaged product.
> >I think "sanitary" is used to mean the item is used for sanitary
> >purposes.
>
> Yes, I know that. But hand soap and toilet paper are items used for
> sanitary purposes. We don't see "Sanitary toilet paper", in the
> store.
>
> Kotex pads are also referred to as "sanitary napkins". That's even
> worse.

Go ask your wife about the difference.

Not skipping every TV commercial can introduce you to vocabulary for
unfamiliar items.
CDB
2018-07-01 17:11:29 UTC
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On 7/1/2018 8:27 AM, Tony Cooper wrote:
> "Peter Duncanson [BrE]" <***@peterduncanson.net> wrote:
>> Tony Cooper <***@gmail.com> wrote:
>>> ***@zedat.fu-berlin.de (Stefan Ram) wrote:

>>>> *** The following text might be something *** *** that
>>>> sensitive minds want to avoid! ***

>>>> I read on a Web page:

>>>> |It became one of the first self-service items in American
>>>> |retailing history after it was strategically placed on
>>>> |countertops with a special payment box so that the woman
>>>> |didn't have to ask a clerk for it and touch hands.
>>>> en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kotex&oldid=839205839

>>>> . What does "touch hands" mean here?

>>>> Does it mean that the woman does not have to touch the hands of
>>>> a clerk? She surely still has to touch the product!

>>> The product is Kotex sanitary pads. There might be some aversion
>>> on the part of a shop clerk to being touched by a woman who is
>>> menstruating. It is the clerk, not the product, that doesn't
>>> want to be touched.

>>> That phrase, "sanitary pads", has always annoyed me. The
>>> product isn't any more or less sanitary than any other packaged
>>> product.

>> I think "sanitary" is used to mean the item is used for sanitary
>> purposes.

> Yes, I know that. But hand soap and toilet paper are items used for
> sanitary purposes. We don't see "Sanitary toilet paper", in the
> store.

> Kotex pads are also referred to as "sanitary napkins". That's even
> worse.

They don't want to force their customers to look at biology close up.
For the same reason, ads demonstrating the napkins' absorbent qualities
always use blue liquid.

Noserubbing is seldom successful. I discovered when walking my last dog
friend, Montana, that she had had that done to her. It didn't stop her
from pooping on the edge of some curmudgeon's* lawn, but it made it very
hard to pull her towards me when a car came along. The Kotex people
may have found the same.
_____________________________________________________
Yes, curmudgeon. I always picked up after my dogs.
John Varela
2018-07-02 16:33:20 UTC
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On Sun, 1 Jul 2018 17:11:29 UTC, CDB <***@gmail.com> wrote:

> On 7/1/2018 8:27 AM, Tony Cooper wrote:
> > "Peter Duncanson [BrE]" <***@peterduncanson.net> wrote:
> >> Tony Cooper <***@gmail.com> wrote:
> >>> ***@zedat.fu-berlin.de (Stefan Ram) wrote:
>
> >>>> *** The following text might be something *** *** that
> >>>> sensitive minds want to avoid! ***
>
> >>>> I read on a Web page:
>
> >>>> |It became one of the first self-service items in American
> >>>> |retailing history after it was strategically placed on
> >>>> |countertops with a special payment box so that the woman
> >>>> |didn't have to ask a clerk for it and touch hands.
> >>>> en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kotex&oldid=839205839
>
> >>>> . What does "touch hands" mean here?
>
> >>>> Does it mean that the woman does not have to touch the hands of
> >>>> a clerk? She surely still has to touch the product!
>
> >>> The product is Kotex sanitary pads. There might be some aversion
> >>> on the part of a shop clerk to being touched by a woman who is
> >>> menstruating. It is the clerk, not the product, that doesn't
> >>> want to be touched.
>
> >>> That phrase, "sanitary pads", has always annoyed me. The
> >>> product isn't any more or less sanitary than any other packaged
> >>> product.
>
> >> I think "sanitary" is used to mean the item is used for sanitary
> >> purposes.
>
> > Yes, I know that. But hand soap and toilet paper are items used for
> > sanitary purposes. We don't see "Sanitary toilet paper", in the
> > store.
>
> > Kotex pads are also referred to as "sanitary napkins". That's even
> > worse.
>
> They don't want to force their customers to look at biology close up.
> For the same reason, ads demonstrating the napkins' absorbent qualities
> always use blue liquid.
>
> Noserubbing is seldom successful. I discovered when walking my last dog
> friend, Montana, that she had had that done to her. It didn't stop her
> from pooping on the edge of some curmudgeon's* lawn, but it made it very
> hard to pull her towards me when a car came along. The Kotex people
> may have found the same.
> _____________________________________________________
> Yes, curmudgeon. I always picked up after my dogs.

I may be a curmudgeon then. A few years ago there was a man who
walked a dog on one of those reel type leashes that lets the dog go
a good 20 feet (7 meters) away. He had let the dog go up into the
neighbor's yard and root around in a flower bed. You're damned
right I yelled at him.

Why don't you let your dog do his thing in your own yard? Or take
it to a dog park?

--
John Varela
Janet
2018-07-01 13:05:08 UTC
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In article <***@4ax.com>, tonycooper214
@gmail.com says...
>
> On 1 Jul 2018 08:37:01 GMT, ***@zedat.fu-berlin.de (Stefan Ram) wrote:
>
> > *** The following text might be something ***
> > *** that sensitive minds want to avoid! ***
> >
> > I read on a Web page:
> >
> >|It became one of the first self-service items in American
> >|retailing history after it was strategically placed on
> >|countertops with a special payment box so that the woman
> >|didn't have to ask a clerk for it and touch hands.
> >en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kotex&oldid=839205839
> >
> > . What does "touch hands" mean here?
> >
> > Does it mean that the woman does not have to touch the hands
> > of a clerk? She surely still has to touch the product!
>
> The product is Kotex sanitary pads. There might be some aversion on
> the part of a shop clerk to being touched by a woman who is
> menstruating. It is the clerk, not the product, that doesn't want to
> be touched.
>
> That phrase, "sanitary pads", has always annoyed me. The product
> isn't any more or less sanitary than any other packaged product.

They are a lot more sanitary than the kind of menstrual protection that
preceded it, used by (and shared between) my grandmother, mother and her
sisters.

"Sanitary" refers to single-use disposable menstrual pads. They
replaced multiple-use menstrual protection that had to be washed and
dried and re-used.

It's barely a century since blood-soaked hospital/surgical wound
dressings and bandages were also washed, dried and re-used.

Janet.
Jerry Friedman
2018-07-01 23:38:31 UTC
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On 7/1/18 2:37 AM, Stefan Ram wrote:
> *** The following text might be something ***
> *** that sensitive minds want to avoid! ***

Unlikely.

> I read on a Web page:
>
> |It became one of the first self-service items in American
> |retailing history after it was strategically placed on
> |countertops with a special payment box so that the woman
> |didn't have to ask a clerk for it and touch hands.
> en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kotex&oldid=839205839
>
> . What does "touch hands" mean here?
>
> Does it mean that the woman does not have to touch the hands
> of a clerk?

That's how it's written.

> She surely still has to touch the product!

She might not like to touch a man's hand while talking or thinking about
something so intimate. Or as Tony Cooper said, it might be about a
man's possible aversion to touching a woman during her period (see
Leviticus 15:19). The woman might be being considerate of the clerk's
feelings, or it might be a badly written sentence saying that the clerk
didn't have to touch her hand.

Or it might just be wrong. There's no source for the sentence in the
Wikiparticle. Other articles I can find on the Web say only that the
reason Kotex was self-service (take a package from a basket and drop in
65 cents) was so women could avoid the embarrassment of mentioning it.

--
Jerry Friedman
Stefan Ram
2018-07-01 23:44:41 UTC
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Jerry Friedman <***@yahoo.com> writes:
>On 7/1/18 2:37 AM, Stefan Ram wrote:
>>What does "touch hands" mean here?
>>Does it mean that the woman does not have to touch the hands
>>of a clerk?
>That's how it's written.

(I wondered whether it might have been some idiom like
"touch base" or "the touch".)

Thanks for all replies!
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-07-02 06:55:02 UTC
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On 2018-07-01 23:38:31 +0000, Jerry Friedman said:

> On 7/1/18 2:37 AM, Stefan Ram wrote:
>> *** The following text might be something ***
>> *** that sensitive minds want to avoid! ***
>
> Unlikely.

Yes, but we know from previous posts that Stefan is prudish in the extreme.
>
>> I read on a Web page:
>>
>> |It became one of the first self-service items in American
>> |retailing history after it was strategically placed on
>> |countertops with a special payment box so that the woman
>> |didn't have to ask a clerk for it and touch hands.
>> en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kotex&oldid=839205839
>>
>> . What does "touch hands" mean here?
>>
>> Does it mean that the woman does not have to touch the hands
>> of a clerk?
>
> That's how it's written.
> ...

--
athel
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-07-02 09:49:52 UTC
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On Sun, 1 Jul 2018 17:38:31 -0600, Jerry Friedman
<***@yahoo.com> wrote:

>On 7/1/18 2:37 AM, Stefan Ram wrote:
>> *** The following text might be something ***
>> *** that sensitive minds want to avoid! ***
>
>Unlikely.
>
>> I read on a Web page:
>>
>> |It became one of the first self-service items in American
>> |retailing history after it was strategically placed on
>> |countertops with a special payment box so that the woman
>> |didn't have to ask a clerk for it and touch hands.
>> en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kotex&oldid=839205839
>>
>> . What does "touch hands" mean here?
>>
>> Does it mean that the woman does not have to touch the hands
>> of a clerk?
>
>That's how it's written.
>
>> She surely still has to touch the product!
>
>She might not like to touch a man's hand while talking or thinking about
>something so intimate. Or as Tony Cooper said, it might be about a
>man's possible aversion to touching a woman during her period (see
>Leviticus 15:19). The woman might be being considerate of the clerk's
>feelings, or it might be a badly written sentence saying that the clerk
>didn't have to touch her hand.
>
>Or it might just be wrong. There's no source for the sentence in the
>Wikiparticle. Other articles I can find on the Web say only that the
>reason Kotex was self-service (take a package from a basket and drop in
>65 cents) was so women could avoid the embarrassment of mentioning it.

That sounds logical.

I've seen reports of money being passed to the clerk and change back to
the customer by putting it on the counter, or in a dish/bowl on the
counter, so that the customer and clerk didn't touch hangs. However, I
don't recall seeing that during my lifetime.[1] It might have been done
in previous centuries. It might still be done by some as a religious
requirement or preference.

I have a vague distant memory of seeing a wooden bowl on a oounter for
passing cash between customer and clerk, but I don't know whether that
was in real life, in a movie, imagined in my mind, or whatever.

--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-07-02 10:12:34 UTC
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On Mon, 02 Jul 2018 10:49:52 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
<***@peterduncanson.net> wrote:

>counter, so that the customer and clerk didn't touch hangs. However, I
...hands.

--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
J. J. Lodder
2018-07-02 10:12:36 UTC
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Peter Duncanson [BrE] <***@peterduncanson.net> wrote:

> On Sun, 1 Jul 2018 17:38:31 -0600, Jerry Friedman
> <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
> >On 7/1/18 2:37 AM, Stefan Ram wrote:
> >> *** The following text might be something ***
> >> *** that sensitive minds want to avoid! ***
> >
> >Unlikely.
> >
> >> I read on a Web page:
> >>
> >> |It became one of the first self-service items in American
> >> |retailing history after it was strategically placed on
> >> |countertops with a special payment box so that the woman
> >> |didn't have to ask a clerk for it and touch hands.
> >> en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kotex&oldid=839205839
> >>
> >> . What does "touch hands" mean here?
> >>
> >> Does it mean that the woman does not have to touch the hands
> >> of a clerk?
> >
> >That's how it's written.
> >
> >> She surely still has to touch the product!
> >
> >She might not like to touch a man's hand while talking or thinking about
> >something so intimate. Or as Tony Cooper said, it might be about a
> >man's possible aversion to touching a woman during her period (see
> >Leviticus 15:19). The woman might be being considerate of the clerk's
> >feelings, or it might be a badly written sentence saying that the clerk
> >didn't have to touch her hand.
> >
> >Or it might just be wrong. There's no source for the sentence in the
> >Wikiparticle. Other articles I can find on the Web say only that the
> >reason Kotex was self-service (take a package from a basket and drop in
> >65 cents) was so women could avoid the embarrassment of mentioning it.
>
> That sounds logical.
>
> I've seen reports of money being passed to the clerk and change back to
> the customer by putting it on the counter, or in a dish/bowl on the
> counter, so that the customer and clerk didn't touch hangs. However, I
> don't recall seeing that during my lifetime.[1] It might have been done
> in previous centuries. It might still be done by some as a religious
> requirement or preference.
>
> I have a vague distant memory of seeing a wooden bowl on a oounter for
> passing cash between customer and clerk, but I don't know whether that
> was in real life, in a movie, imagined in my mind, or whatever.

I have seen a payment machine for that.
You tell them what you want, they total the amount,
you go to a machine that accepts bills and coins,
and gives change back. (or you pay by card)
Then you collect what you bought from the counter.

Great, but the next time I went there
it had a 'not working' sticker taped on,

Jan
Jerry Friedman
2018-07-02 22:22:31 UTC
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On 7/2/18 3:49 AM, Peter Duncanson [BrE] wrote:
> On Sun, 1 Jul 2018 17:38:31 -0600, Jerry Friedman
> <***@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> On 7/1/18 2:37 AM, Stefan Ram wrote:
>>> *** The following text might be something ***
>>> *** that sensitive minds want to avoid! ***
>>
>> Unlikely.
>>
>>> I read on a Web page:
>>>
>>> |It became one of the first self-service items in American
>>> |retailing history after it was strategically placed on
>>> |countertops with a special payment box so that the woman
>>> |didn't have to ask a clerk for it and touch hands.
>>> en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kotex&oldid=839205839
>>>
>>> . What does "touch hands" mean here?
>>>
>>> Does it mean that the woman does not have to touch the hands
>>> of a clerk?
>>
>> That's how it's written.
>>
>>> She surely still has to touch the product!
>>
>> She might not like to touch a man's hand while talking or thinking about
>> something so intimate. Or as Tony Cooper said, it might be about a
>> man's possible aversion to touching a woman during her period (see
>> Leviticus 15:19). The woman might be being considerate of the clerk's
>> feelings, or it might be a badly written sentence saying that the clerk
>> didn't have to touch her hand.
>>
>> Or it might just be wrong. There's no source for the sentence in the
>> Wikiparticle. Other articles I can find on the Web say only that the
>> reason Kotex was self-service (take a package from a basket and drop in
>> 65 cents) was so women could avoid the embarrassment of mentioning it.
>
> That sounds logical.
>
> I've seen reports of money being passed to the clerk and change back to
> the customer by putting it on the counter, or in a dish/bowl on the
> counter, so that the customer and clerk didn't touch hangs. However, I
> don't recall seeing that during my lifetime.[1] It might have been done
> in previous centuries. It might still be done by some as a religious
> requirement or preference.

Haredi ("Ultra-Orthodox") Jews, for example.

https://www.chabad.org/library/article_cdo/aid/1051760/jewish/May-I-Shake-the-Ladys-Hand.htm

http://www.myproana.com/index.php/topic/660951-i-am-an-ultra-orthodox-hasidic-jew-ask-me-anything/

> I have a vague distant memory of seeing a wooden bowl on a oounter for
> passing cash between customer and clerk, but I don't know whether that
> was in real life, in a movie, imagined in my mind, or whatever.

I have definite memories of cash registers that make change
automatically and roll it down a track into a little bowl. I assume the
main purpose of that, after fascinating children, is to avoid mistakes
with the change. I pay for almost everything with a card these days, so
I don't notice change-making methods, but I think the Walmart here has that.

--
Jerry Friedman
John Varela
2018-07-02 16:38:19 UTC
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On Sun, 1 Jul 2018 23:38:31 UTC, Jerry Friedman
<***@yahoo.com> wrote:

> Other articles I can find on the Web say only that the
> reason Kotex was self-service (take a package from a basket and drop in
> 65 cents) was so women could avoid the embarrassment of mentioning it.

The embarrassment factor is given as the reason that the most
shoplifted item in the drug store is Preparation H. [ObTWIAVBP:
Preparation H is a salve for hemorrhoids.]

--
John Varela
Rich Ulrich
2018-07-02 18:13:30 UTC
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On 2 Jul 2018 16:38:19 GMT, "John Varela" <***@verizon.net>
wrote:

>On Sun, 1 Jul 2018 23:38:31 UTC, Jerry Friedman
><***@yahoo.com> wrote:
>
>> Other articles I can find on the Web say only that the
>> reason Kotex was self-service (take a package from a basket and drop in
>> 65 cents) was so women could avoid the embarrassment of mentioning it.
>
>The embarrassment factor is given as the reason that the most
>shoplifted item in the drug store is Preparation H. [ObTWIAVBP:
>Preparation H is a salve for hemorrhoids.]

And then, stores put "most-shoplifted items" behind the
counter, so that you /have/ to ask for them.

Embarrassment factor - in the old days, frat boys undergoing
mild hazing might be required to visit a drug store to purchase Kotex.
That was probably a useful sort of de-sensitization for new adults.

I wonder if the ease of Internet purchasing means that kids today
would be more, or less, embarrassed doing that.

--
Rich Ulrich
Stefan Ram
2018-07-02 18:29:11 UTC
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Rich Ulrich <***@comcast.net> writes:
>Embarrassment factor - in the old days, frat boys undergoing
>mild hazing might be required to visit a drug store to purchase Kotex.

That's where I got the term from! I was/am reading a book
called "Portnoy's Complaint". Quote [she = the narrator's
mother]:

|It was years later that she called from the bathroom, Run to
|the drugstore! bring a box of Kotex! immediately! And the
|panic in her voice. Did I run!

...

|Where was my sister, for Christ's sake? Where was her own
|emergency supply? Why was this woman so grossly insensitive
|to the vulnerability of her own little boy

So, I looked it up in the Wikipedia, which then lead to my
post here.
Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2018-07-02 01:35:52 UTC
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Rarissima avis Stefan Ram wrote:
>
> *** The following text might be something ***
> *** that sensitive minds want to avoid! ***
>
Don't worry, weirdo. No one here is as
pathologically prudish as you are.

--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
Lewis
2018-07-01 22:31:32 UTC
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In message <touch-hands-***@ram.dialup.fu-berlin.de> Stefan Ram <***@zedat.fu-berlin.de> wrote:
> *** The following text might be something ***
> *** that sensitive minds want to avoid! ***

> I read on a Web page:

>|It became one of the first self-service items in American
>|retailing history after it was strategically placed on
>|countertops with a special payment box so that the woman
>|didn't have to ask a clerk for it and touch hands.
> en.wikipedia.org/w/index.php?title=Kotex&oldid=839205839

> . What does "touch hands" mean here?

Make any contact from one hand to another.

> Does it mean that the woman does not have to touch the hands
> of a clerk?

Or vice versa.

> She surely still has to touch the product!

But the clerk does not.

This is all rooted in the misogynistic belief that a woman who is
menstruating is 'unclean' and should not touch or be touched.

--
My mind is going. There is no question about it. I can feel it. I can
feel it. I can feel it. I'm... afraid.
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