Discussion:
Future date
(too old to reply)
Tony Cooper
2018-06-04 18:36:48 UTC
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We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
a novel, set in Manchester, written by a British author I came across:
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."

"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers. Not a
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-06-04 19:37:51 UTC
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On Mon, 04 Jun 2018 14:36:48 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers. Not a
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
I have a vague memory of meeting that use of "syndicate".
Normally it is used as a description of a group of criminals, a "crime
syndicate".

I don't know how widely it is used, but:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Greater_Manchester_Police

Major Investigation Team

Greater Manchester Police has eight specialist Major Investigation
syndicates.[32]

[32] links to a news report, in 2014, about historic sex abuse cases in
Greater Manchester:
https://www.manchestereveningnews.co.uk/news/greater-manchester-news/quarter-greater-manchester-polices-top-7775773

All these investigations and others have swamped GMP, which has now
tasked two of its eight Major Investigation Team syndicates to
dealing with them.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Richard Tobin
2018-06-04 19:38:26 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers. Not a
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
I've never heard it, but it may well be real police jargon.

-- Richard
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-06-04 19:43:36 UTC
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On Mon, 04 Jun 2018 14:36:48 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
I had to read that twice to confirm that "Chadderton" was a person's
name because Chadderton is also a town in Greater Manchester.
Post by Tony Cooper
"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers. Not a
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Tony Cooper
2018-06-04 21:51:12 UTC
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On Mon, 04 Jun 2018 20:43:36 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Mon, 04 Jun 2018 14:36:48 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
I had to read that twice to confirm that "Chadderton" was a person's
name because Chadderton is also a town in Greater Manchester.
It is a reference to the town. It's that abrupt dialog in which the
speaker omits "in". The instruction is to show up at the Chadderton
nick.

What stopped me, though, was the "week on Monday". I wouldn't know on
which Monday to show up.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Tony Cooper
"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers. Not a
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mark Brader
2018-06-04 22:02:26 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
...It's that abrupt dialog in which the
speaker omits "in". The instruction is to show up at the Chadderton
nick.
What stopped me, though, was the "week on Monday".
It's that abrupt dialog in which the speaker omits "a". Read it as
"a week on Monday".
I wouldn't know on which Monday to show up.
The second Monday after today.
--
Mark Brader | "Nothing is more sacrosanct than our professional ethics.
Toronto | Fortunately, I know a trick to get around them."
***@vex.net | --Niles Crane, "Frasier" (Ranberg & Flett-Giordano)
Paul Wolff
2018-06-04 22:51:59 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
...It's that abrupt dialog in which the
speaker omits "in". The instruction is to show up at the Chadderton
nick.
What stopped me, though, was the "week on Monday".
It's that abrupt dialog in which the speaker omits "a". Read it as
"a week on Monday".
I wouldn't know on which Monday to show up.
The second Monday after today.
Took the words right out of my mouth. A week after Monday coming.
--
Paul
pensive hamster
2018-06-05 00:10:09 UTC
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Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
...It's that abrupt dialog in which the
speaker omits "in". The instruction is to show up at the Chadderton
nick.
What stopped me, though, was the "week on Monday".
It's that abrupt dialog in which the speaker omits "a". Read it as
"a week on Monday".
I wouldn't know on which Monday to show up.
The second Monday after today.
Took the words right out of my mouth. A week after Monday coming.
I was going to say "A week after next Monday."
Or "Next Monday but one."
Jerry Friedman
2018-06-05 03:32:13 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
...It's that abrupt dialog in which the
speaker omits "in". The instruction is to show up at the Chadderton
nick.
What stopped me, though, was the "week on Monday".
It's that abrupt dialog in which the speaker omits "a". Read it as
"a week on Monday".
...

Not speaking for Tony, but that wouldn't make it any more familiar to me.
--
Jerry Friedman
Steve Hayes
2018-06-09 15:17:09 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me.
In a novel, set in Manchester, written by a British author I came
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
...It's that abrupt dialog in which the speaker omits "in". The
instruction is to show up at the Chadderton nick.
What stopped me, though, was the "week on Monday".
It's that abrupt dialog in which the speaker omits "a". Read it as "a
week on Monday".
...
Not speaking for Tony, but that wouldn't make it any more familiar to me.
You'd probably find the South African version even more unfamiliar --
"Monday next of next week".
--
Steve Hayes http://khanya.wordpress.com
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-05 03:15:16 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 04 Jun 2018 20:43:36 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Mon, 04 Jun 2018 14:36:48 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
I had to read that twice to confirm that "Chadderton" was a person's
name because Chadderton is also a town in Greater Manchester.
It is a reference to the town. It's that abrupt dialog in which the
speaker omits "in". The instruction is to show up at the Chadderton
nick.
What stopped me, though, was the "week on Monday". I wouldn't know on
which Monday to show up.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Tony Cooper
"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers. Not a
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-06-05 10:17:33 UTC
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On Mon, 04 Jun 2018 17:51:12 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 04 Jun 2018 20:43:36 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Mon, 04 Jun 2018 14:36:48 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
I had to read that twice to confirm that "Chadderton" was a person's
name because Chadderton is also a town in Greater Manchester.
It is a reference to the town. It's that abrupt dialog in which the
speaker omits "in". The instruction is to show up at the Chadderton
nick.
OK.
Post by Tony Cooper
What stopped me, though, was the "week on Monday". I wouldn't know on
which Monday to show up.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Tony Cooper
"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers. Not a
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Stefan Ram
2018-06-04 23:18:36 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
0 1
Post by Tony Cooper
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
2 3 4
Post by Tony Cooper
"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers. Not a
5 6
Post by Tony Cooper
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
The text of your post contains /seven/ quotations marks.
The number of quotation marks in a text should be /even/.
Tony Cooper
2018-06-04 23:59:45 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
0 1
Post by Tony Cooper
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
2 3 4
Post by Tony Cooper
"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers. Not a
5 6
Post by Tony Cooper
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
The text of your post contains /seven/ quotations marks.
The number of quotation marks in a text should be /even/.
Please feel free to either take one or add one.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
bill van
2018-06-05 00:09:21 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
0 1
Post by Tony Cooper
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
2 3 4
Post by Tony Cooper
"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers. Not a
5 6
Post by Tony Cooper
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
The text of your post contains /seven/ quotations marks.
The number of quotation marks in a text should be /even/.
It is a common publishing style to begin a paragraph with quote marks
and not put quote marks at the end of the paragraph when the quoted
material is continued in the next paragraph. This can give you odd
numbers of quote marks.

However, in the text quoted above, there is one quote mark too many:
the one following Chadderton.

bill
Jerry Friedman
2018-06-05 00:43:55 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
                         0           1
Post by Tony Cooper
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
 2                                          3             4
Post by Tony Cooper
"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers.  Not a
 5         6
Post by Tony Cooper
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
  The text of your post contains /seven/ quotations marks.
  The number of quotation marks in a text should be /even/.
It is a common publishing style to begin a paragraph with quote marks
and not put quote marks at the end of the paragraph when the quoted
material is continued in the next paragraph. This can give you odd
numbers of quote marks.
However, in the text quoted above, there is one quote mark too many: the
one following Chadderton.
It seems it's the one following Monday that's extra.
--
Jerry Friedman
Tony Cooper
2018-06-05 02:59:24 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
0 1
Post by Tony Cooper
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
2 3 4
Post by Tony Cooper
"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers. Not a
5 6
Post by Tony Cooper
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
The text of your post contains /seven/ quotations marks.
The number of quotation marks in a text should be /even/.
It is a common publishing style to begin a paragraph with quote marks
and not put quote marks at the end of the paragraph when the quoted
material is continued in the next paragraph. This can give you odd
numbers of quote marks.
the one following Chadderton.
No, the quote mark that shouldn't be there is before Chadderton. I
had started to quote just the part of the sentence without Chadderton,
and then added it without removing the closing quote.

It was the "week on Monday" I found worth comment, not Chadderton.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-05 03:17:30 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by bill van
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
0 1
Post by Tony Cooper
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
2 3 4
Post by Tony Cooper
"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers. Not a
5 6
Post by Tony Cooper
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
The text of your post contains /seven/ quotations marks.
The number of quotation marks in a text should be /even/.
It is a common publishing style to begin a paragraph with quote marks
and not put quote marks at the end of the paragraph when the quoted
material is continued in the next paragraph. This can give you odd
numbers of quote marks.
the one following Chadderton.
No, the quote mark that shouldn't be there is before Chadderton. I
had started to quote just the part of the sentence without Chadderton,
and then added it without removing the closing quote.
It was the "week on Monday" I found worth comment, not Chadderton.
Which would be why the one thing you commented on was "syndicate."
Peter Moylan
2018-06-05 01:48:44 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
0 1
Post by Tony Cooper
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
2 3 4
Post by Tony Cooper
"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers. Not a
5 6
Post by Tony Cooper
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
The text of your post contains /seven/ quotations marks.
The number of quotation marks in a text should be /even/.
This strikes me as a strange application of zero-based numbering. Are
you suggesting that the first quotation mark to be encountered is
actually the zeroth quotation mark?
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Stefan Ram
2018-06-05 02:03:57 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
This strikes me as a strange application of zero-based numbering. Are
you suggesting that the first quotation mark to be encountered is
actually the zeroth quotation mark?
http://www.purl.org/stefan_ram/pub/zero

(See the second section "Names and Descriptions".)
Peter Moylan
2018-06-05 03:28:21 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Peter Moylan
This strikes me as a strange application of zero-based numbering.
Are you suggesting that the first quotation mark to be encountered
is actually the zeroth quotation mark?
http://www.purl.org/stefan_ram/pub/zero
(See the second section "Names and Descriptions".)
I agree with some of those statements, but by no means all. In
particular, I think that saying that the Nth object in a sequence is the
one labelled N-1 is only creating problems for oneself and confusion for
others. C programmers do it; but they do it because of a limitation of
the language, not because it's a good idea.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-06-05 07:03:07 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Peter Moylan
This strikes me as a strange application of zero-based numbering.
Are you suggesting that the first quotation mark to be encountered
is actually the zeroth quotation mark?
http://www.purl.org/stefan_ram/pub/zero
(See the second section "Names and Descriptions".)
I agree with some of those statements, but by no means all. In
particular, I think that saying that the Nth object in a sequence is the
one labelled N-1 is only creating problems for oneself and confusion for
others. C programmers do it; but they do it because of a limitation of
the language, not because it's a good idea.
The meaning of “first” is given by the English language, which also
dictates that there is no “zeroth” item. „First“ is also written as
„1st“, „second“ is also written as „2nd“ and so on.
Who is Stefan Ram to lecture on the proper (and, in this case,
consistent) use of quotation marks in the English language? In normal
English "First" is _never_ written as „1st“.
--
athel
John Varela
2018-06-06 00:58:19 UTC
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On Tue, 5 Jun 2018 03:28:21 UTC, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Peter Moylan
This strikes me as a strange application of zero-based numbering.
Are you suggesting that the first quotation mark to be encountered
is actually the zeroth quotation mark?
http://www.purl.org/stefan_ram/pub/zero
(See the second section "Names and Descriptions".)
I agree with some of those statements, but by no means all. In
particular, I think that saying that the Nth object in a sequence is the
one labelled N-1 is only creating problems for oneself and confusion for
others. C programmers do it; but they do it because of a limitation of
the language, not because it's a good idea.
That would go back to the olden days when we coded in fixed point
and had to make use of every bit in every word in core memory.
There was none of this wasteful use of doing everything on byte
boundaries. So if you were representing a logical item that could
take on four values, you only needed and you would only use two
bits. The item could then have values of 0, 1, 2, or 3. And an
on/off flag (usually the sign bit) would have values 0 or 1. Now
that I think of it I wonder if the standard icon for on/off, a 1
superimposed on a 0, doesn't originate from that.
--
John Varela
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-06-06 11:06:33 UTC
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Post by John Varela
On Tue, 5 Jun 2018 03:28:21 UTC, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Peter Moylan
This strikes me as a strange application of zero-based numbering.
Are you suggesting that the first quotation mark to be encountered
is actually the zeroth quotation mark?
http://www.purl.org/stefan_ram/pub/zero
(See the second section "Names and Descriptions".)
I agree with some of those statements, but by no means all. In
particular, I think that saying that the Nth object in a sequence is the
one labelled N-1 is only creating problems for oneself and confusion for
others. C programmers do it; but they do it because of a limitation of
the language, not because it's a good idea.
That would go back to the olden days when we coded in fixed point
and had to make use of every bit in every word in core memory.
There was none of this wasteful use of doing everything on byte
boundaries. So if you were representing a logical item that could
take on four values, you only needed and you would only use two
bits. The item could then have values of 0, 1, 2, or 3. And an
on/off flag (usually the sign bit) would have values 0 or 1. Now
that I think of it I wonder if the standard icon for on/off, a 1
superimposed on a 0, doesn't originate from that.
It has oft been surmised ...

<http://designblog.nzeldes.com/2008/05/the-evolution-of-the-onoff-power-switch-symbol/comment-page-2/>

But there's an official standard and it don't work that way.

See Definitions at ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Power_symbol
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-06-05 06:59:04 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
0 1
Post by Tony Cooper
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
2 3 4
Post by Tony Cooper
"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers. Not a
5 6
Post by Tony Cooper
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
The text of your post contains /seven/ quotations marks.
The number of quotation marks in a text should be /even/.
When you start using proper quotation marks yourself you'll perhaps be
in a position to make silly corrections to other posts.
--
athel
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-06-05 07:05:29 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
We've discussed the BrE "Monday week", but this is a new one on me. In
"I want you in my syndicate, week on Monday", Chadderton."
"Syndicate" is used here to indicate a team of police officers. Not a
usage I'm familiar with, but not a usage that I find all that unusual.
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
--
athel
Mark Brader
2018-06-05 08:42:43 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
Or if not currently, then perhaps at some future date, such as
a week on Monday?
--
Mark Brader "All economic statistics are best seen as
Toronto a peculiarly boring form of science fiction..."
***@vex.net --Paul Krugman
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-05 12:56:51 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
pensive hamster
2018-06-05 16:36:10 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
On Firefox at least, GG gives the thread title in the tab at the top.
If it is a long title, hovering the mouse pointer over the tab causes
GG to produce a little boxout with the full title.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-05 16:55:54 UTC
Permalink
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Post by pensive hamster
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
On Firefox at least, GG gives the thread title in the tab at the top.
If it is a long title, hovering the mouse pointer over the tab causes
GG to produce a little boxout with the full title.
As I said, hard to see.
s***@gmail.com
2018-06-05 20:39:52 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by pensive hamster
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
On Firefox at least, GG gives the thread title in the tab at the top.
If it is a long title, hovering the mouse pointer over the tab causes
GG to produce a little boxout with the full title.
As I said, hard to see.
The tab is always available for hovering.

Some versions of FF show the "Future date - Google Groups - Mozilla Firefox"
as the title of the window, if that's the active tab
(or "Keller Auditorium - Wikipedia - Mozilla Firefox" if I switch to
a tab that I opened during one of our Architecture Excursions,
and which I keep open from nostalgia).

Chrome doesn't seem to do the title trick, but does do the tab hover tooltip.

Scrolling up seems too much work when easier methods abound.

/dps
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-05 20:54:36 UTC
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Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by pensive hamster
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
On Firefox at least, GG gives the thread title in the tab at the top.
If it is a long title, hovering the mouse pointer over the tab causes
GG to produce a little boxout with the full title.
As I said, hard to see.
The tab is always available for hovering.
As I said, etc.
Post by s***@gmail.com
Some versions of FF show the "Future date - Google Groups - Mozilla Firefox"
as the title of the window, if that's the active tab
(or "Keller Auditorium - Wikipedia - Mozilla Firefox" if I switch to
a tab that I opened during one of our Architecture Excursions,
and which I keep open from nostalgia).
Chrome doesn't seem to do the title trick, but does do the tab hover tooltip.
Scrolling up seems too much work when easier methods abound.
The "easier method" being to mouse up to the tab. Just as not-easy as
scrolling.
s***@gmail.com
2018-06-05 21:11:31 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by s***@gmail.com
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by pensive hamster
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
On Firefox at least, GG gives the thread title in the tab at the top.
If it is a long title, hovering the mouse pointer over the tab causes
GG to produce a little boxout with the full title.
As I said, hard to see.
The tab is always available for hovering.
As I said, etc.
Not hard at all.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by s***@gmail.com
Some versions of FF show the "Future date - Google Groups - Mozilla Firefox"
as the title of the window, if that's the active tab
(or "Keller Auditorium - Wikipedia - Mozilla Firefox" if I switch to
a tab that I opened during one of our Architecture Excursions,
and which I keep open from nostalgia).
Chrome doesn't seem to do the title trick, but does do the tab hover tooltip.
Scrolling up seems too much work when easier methods abound.
The "easier method" being to mouse up to the tab. Just as not-easy as
scrolling.
Hmm. Perhaps I have my mouse speed set higher than yours.
Although you can scroll all the way up with just one keystroke.
(You can also scroll all the way down with just one keystroke,
but that may not take you back to the post you were reading).

In Mesnews, the header display will scroll past the top of the subwindow
for just about anything but one line posts,
and since the threadlist subwindow indents the replies
the subject line in a deep thread may not show in that window,
and I do eventually flush the short-term memory of what I clicked on.
The perfect world is yet to be found.

/dps
Peter Moylan
2018-06-05 16:48:44 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
Hold on. I thought we'd been told that those of us who do NOT use GG are
being lazy when we're not willing to lift our eyes to the thread pane to
see the subject line. Presumably that meant that the subject was obvious
to GG users. Certainly it seems to be only GG users who don't bother to
say what they're talking about in the body of the article. Bozo is not
the only one to do this.

In any case, I'd advise Tony to be especially cautious. Those "horny
girls" frequently lose track of whether they're supposed to be male or
female.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-05 17:03:00 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
Hold on. I thought we'd been told that those of us who do NOT use GG are
being lazy when we're not willing to lift our eyes to the thread pane to
see the subject line. Presumably that meant that the subject was obvious
to GG users. Certainly it seems to be only GG users who don't bother to
say what they're talking about in the body of the article. Bozo is not
the only one to do this.
I've no idea who does that. Bozo's message bodies are so short that the
thread title hasn't yet scrolled away, but the actual thread title is
displayed only above the first message on each 25-message page of the
thread, and if there's any heft to the message at all, the title will
already have disappeared into the upper frame.
Post by Peter Moylan
In any case, I'd advise Tony to be especially cautious. Those "horny
girls" frequently lose track of whether they're supposed to be male or
female.
One of them, whom I see as "Lucymart...," posts the same message in several
threads, and because she does them one after the other, they usually appear
successively as I click the "Previous" button. But on the display of authors
and first lines, any number of threads I've marked "Spam" can hide under a
single "You marked this thread ignore. Click here to see it anyway." (If I
don't "view" a thread with "unread" messages, they stay unread, unless I
click "Mark all as unread," and in that case I might lose actual messages
that were about to be displayed.)
Tony Cooper
2018-06-05 18:31:06 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
On Wed, 6 Jun 2018 02:48:44 +1000, Peter Moylan
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
Hold on. I thought we'd been told that those of us who do NOT use GG are
being lazy when we're not willing to lift our eyes to the thread pane to
see the subject line. Presumably that meant that the subject was obvious
to GG users. Certainly it seems to be only GG users who don't bother to
say what they're talking about in the body of the article. Bozo is not
the only one to do this.
In any case, I'd advise Tony to be especially cautious. Those "horny
girls" frequently lose track of whether they're supposed to be male or
female.
I'm not rising to these innuendos.

On an AUE note...who can provide an explanation for the use of "horny"
to describe "desirous of sex"?

And, then, who will challenge my use of "sex" since the horny ones are
of one sex or another even though they may desire to be of the one
that they are not?
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-05 19:54:09 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
On an AUE note...who can provide an explanation for the use of "horny"
to describe "desirous of sex"?
I asked Prof. Robert A. Hall, Jr., eminent American Descriptivist linguist
and specialist in Romance philology and dialectology, about that when I
was an undergraduate. He said it relates to the resemblance of an erect
phallus to a typical animal's horn.
Post by Tony Cooper
And, then, who will challenge my use of "sex" since the horny ones are
of one sex or another even though they may desire to be of the one
that they are not?
Hunh?

"Desirous of sex" means 'wishing to engage in sexual activity'.
Paul Wolff
2018-06-05 22:16:11 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
On an AUE note...who can provide an explanation for the use of "horny"
to describe "desirous of sex"?
I asked Prof. Robert A. Hall, Jr., eminent American Descriptivist linguist
and specialist in Romance philology and dialectology, about that when I
was an undergraduate. He said it relates to the resemblance of an erect
phallus to a typical animal's horn.
It's said that returning Roman soldiers were given horns, symbolising
success on the battlefield. But the horns also came to imply failure in
the bedroom, and that it was never a good idea to leave a Roman wife
alone for too long. The horns of a cuckold come into it. Shakespeare:
"crooked-pated old cuckoldy ram".

[extracted from a BBC article, to save myself the trouble of original
research]
--
Paul
Sam Plusnet
2018-06-06 00:42:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Tony Cooper
On an AUE note...who can provide an explanation for the use of "horny"
to describe "desirous of sex"?
I asked Prof. Robert A. Hall, Jr., eminent American Descriptivist linguist
and specialist in Romance philology and dialectology, about that when I
was an undergraduate. He said it relates to the resemblance of an erect
phallus to a typical animal's horn.
Post by Tony Cooper
And, then, who will challenge my use of "sex" since the horny ones are
of one sex or another even though they may desire to be of the one
that they are not?
Hunh?
"Desirous of sex" means 'wishing to engage in sexual activity'.
"Desirous of sex"?

Most of us stick with the gender assigned to us at (OK, before) birth.
Others don't like the Henry Ford option, and insist on making their own
choices.
--
Sam Plusnet
CDB
2018-06-06 11:52:11 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested
in meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
Hold on. I thought we'd been told that those of us who do NOT use
GG are being lazy when we're not willing to lift our eyes to the
thread pane to see the subject line. Presumably that meant that the
subject was obvious to GG users. Certainly it seems to be only GG
users who don't bother to say what they're talking about in the
body of the article. Bozo is not the only one to do this.
In any case, I'd advise Tony to be especially cautious. Those
"horny girls" frequently lose track of whether they're supposed to
be male or female.
I'm not rising to these innuendos.
On an AUE note...who can provide an explanation for the use of
"horny" to describe "desirous of sex"?
Lie down with toad, get horned.
Post by Tony Cooper
And, then, who will challenge my use of "sex" since the horny ones
are of one sex or another even though they may desire to be of the
one that they are not?
Unfair sex!
Jerry Friedman
2018-06-05 18:40:40 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
Hold on. I thought we'd been told that those of us who do NOT use GG are
being lazy when we're not willing to lift our eyes to the thread pane to
see the subject line. Presumably that meant that the subject was obvious
to GG users.
Whether I use GG or T-bird, I click on the thread title to look at the
thread, so the title is always obvious. PTD seems to do something
different.
Post by Peter Moylan
Certainly it seems to be only GG users who don't bother to
say what they're talking about in the body of the article. Bozo is not
the only one to do this.
...

Hm. I'll have to notice whether anyone else does that.
--
Jerry Friedman
Quinn C
2018-06-05 17:03:10 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
That prompted me to make a little count - 33 of the 50 newest threads
were auto-blocked (hidden) here by my own rules. And there's maybe 2
more that should be. I hadn't noticed how bad it had become.
--
The notion that there might be a "truth" of sex, as Foucault
ironically terms it, is produced precisely through the regulatory
practices that generate coherent identities through the matrix of
coherent gender norms. -- Judith Butler
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-05 17:13:50 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
That prompted me to make a little count - 33 of the 50 newest threads
were auto-blocked (hidden) here by my own rules. And there's maybe 2
more that should be. I hadn't noticed how bad it had become.
There used to be a new one or two almost every day, the ones offering drugs
or chemicals for cleaning money. I can't say how many sex threads there are
because they don't all seem to be added to every day (and that's the only
way they get back into the queue).
Quinn C
2018-06-05 17:47:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
That prompted me to make a little count - 33 of the 50 newest threads
were auto-blocked (hidden) here by my own rules. And there's maybe 2
more that should be. I hadn't noticed how bad it had become.
There used to be a new one or two almost every day, the ones offering drugs
or chemicals for cleaning money. I can't say how many sex threads there are
because they don't all seem to be added to every day (and that's the only
way they get back into the queue).
Most of the blocked threads in my sample seem to be from the Colonel
posse and "Maharaj".
--
Java is the SUV of programming tools.
A project done in Java will cost 5 times as much, take twice as
long, and be harder to maintain than a project done in a
scripting language such as PHP or Perl. - Philip Greenspun
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-05 18:06:38 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
That prompted me to make a little count - 33 of the 50 newest threads
were auto-blocked (hidden) here by my own rules. And there's maybe 2
more that should be. I hadn't noticed how bad it had become.
There used to be a new one or two almost every day, the ones offering drugs
or chemicals for cleaning money. I can't say how many sex threads there are
because they don't all seem to be added to every day (and that's the only
way they get back into the queue).
Most of the blocked threads in my sample seem to be from the Colonel
posse and "Maharaj".
There can be half a dozen or more new ones from Kernel daily, only one or
two from Jay Stevens.
Katy Jennison
2018-06-05 18:57:58 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Each time I see the subject line I wonder if Tony is interested in
meeting one of the horny girls who appear here frequently.
GG makes that little _frisson_ hard to see (so I scrolled up for a peek).
That prompted me to make a little count - 33 of the 50 newest threads
were auto-blocked (hidden) here by my own rules. And there's maybe 2
more that should be. I hadn't noticed how bad it had become.
Yes. The noise-to-signal ratio has been worsening over the past months.
I fear this may be the reason for the disappearance of several
erstwhile RRS.
--
Katy Jennison
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