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Using hyphens with the word "vice"
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e***@gmail.com
2016-04-09 11:15:26 UTC
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Hello everybody, I often see "vice" hyphenated ("vice-captain", for example) but I rarely see it hyphenated in the context of the vice president of the United States. Is there a rule on when the word should or should not be hyphenated?

What about "deputy"? Should "deputy prime minister" be hyphenated?

Thanks. :)
Don Phillipson
2016-04-09 11:56:26 UTC
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. . . I often see "vice" hyphenated ("vice-captain", for example) but I
rarely see it
hyphenated in the context of the vice president of the United States. Is
there a
rule on when the word should or should not be hyphenated?
This is a matter of writing style (not grammar or language) and
fully discussed in such sources as the Chicago Manual of Style
(see "Compound Words" in chap. 6.) Governments often develop
their own style rules for official terminology: but nothing compels
uniformity.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Richard Tobin
2016-04-09 12:15:59 UTC
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Post by e***@gmail.com
Hello everybody, I often see "vice" hyphenated ("vice-captain", for
example) but I rarely see it hyphenated in the context of the vice
president of the United States. Is there a rule on when the word should
or should not be hyphenated?
What about "deputy"? Should "deputy prime minister" be hyphenated?
I think "vice-captain" is often hyphenated because "vice" is not
generally thought of as a word in itself (though it is occasionally
used as such). It's a prefix like "post" ("post-war" for example).
"Deputy" on the other hand is a standard word.

-- Richard
CDB
2016-04-09 12:56:16 UTC
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Post by e***@gmail.com
Hello everybody, I often see "vice" hyphenated ("vice-captain", for
example) but I rarely see it hyphenated in the context of the vice
president of the United States. Is there a rule on when the word
should or should not be hyphenated?
What about "deputy"? Should "deputy prime minister" be hyphenated?
As far as Canadian usage is concerned, no. The official procedural
manual of our House of Commons has it consistently as "Deputy Prime
Minister".

http://www.slaw.ca/2010/01/06/house-of-commons-procedure-and-practice-2d-ed-2009-obrien-and-bosc/
RH Draney
2016-04-09 14:37:29 UTC
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Post by e***@gmail.com
Hello everybody, I often see "vice" hyphenated ("vice-captain", for example) but I rarely see it hyphenated in the context of the vice president of the United States. Is there a rule on when the word should or should not be hyphenated?
"Viceroy" should never be hyphenated....r
Mark Brader
2016-04-09 20:12:00 UTC
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Post by e***@gmail.com
Hello everybody, I often see "vice" hyphenated ("vice-captain", for
example) but I rarely see it hyphenated in the context of the vice
president of the United States. Is there a rule on when the word should
or should not be hyphenated?
The office in the US was created by the adoption of their Constitution.
The original text of the constitution spells it "Vice President", but
it was written in 18th-century English and uses spellings like "chuse"
and "encreased". In the 19th century, the 12th and 14th Amendments
used the spelling "Vice-President"; but in the 20th century, the 20th
and several later amendments went back to "Vice President".

Take your pick. I pick "vice-president".
Post by e***@gmail.com
What about "deputy"? Should "deputy prime minister" be hyphenated?
No.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Strange commas are enshrined in
***@vex.net | the US Constitution." --James Hogg

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Lewis
2016-04-10 04:43:50 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by e***@gmail.com
Hello everybody, I often see "vice" hyphenated ("vice-captain", for
example) but I rarely see it hyphenated in the context of the vice
president of the United States. Is there a rule on when the word should
or should not be hyphenated?
The office in the US was created by the adoption of their Constitution.
The original text of the constitution spells it "Vice President", but
it was written in 18th-century English and uses spellings like "chuse"
and "encreased". In the 19th century, the 12th and 14th Amendments
used the spelling "Vice-President"; but in the 20th century, the 20th
and several later amendments went back to "Vice President".
Take your pick. I pick "vice-president".
Well, that is simply wrong. It is either Vice President or
Vice-President, it is never vice president nor vice-president.

Officially, it is not hyphenated.
--
And Super Heroes come to feast
To taste the flesh not yet deceased
And all I know is still the beast is feeding.
bill van
2016-04-10 06:41:09 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Mark Brader
Post by e***@gmail.com
Hello everybody, I often see "vice" hyphenated ("vice-captain", for
example) but I rarely see it hyphenated in the context of the vice
president of the United States. Is there a rule on when the word should
or should not be hyphenated?
The office in the US was created by the adoption of their Constitution.
The original text of the constitution spells it "Vice President", but
it was written in 18th-century English and uses spellings like "chuse"
and "encreased". In the 19th century, the 12th and 14th Amendments
used the spelling "Vice-President"; but in the 20th century, the 20th
and several later amendments went back to "Vice President".
Take your pick. I pick "vice-president".
Well, that is simply wrong. It is either Vice President or
Vice-President, it is never vice president nor vice-president.
What is the purpose of capitalizing it when the vice-presidency or the
vice-president is being discussed generally, without reference to
whoever's holding or has held the office?
Post by Lewis
Officially, it is not hyphenated.
I didn't know that, but a U.S. government site confirms it. I prefer the
hyphenated version.
--
bill
Lewis
2016-04-10 18:19:23 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by Lewis
Post by Mark Brader
Post by e***@gmail.com
Hello everybody, I often see "vice" hyphenated ("vice-captain", for
example) but I rarely see it hyphenated in the context of the vice
president of the United States. Is there a rule on when the word should
or should not be hyphenated?
The office in the US was created by the adoption of their Constitution.
The original text of the constitution spells it "Vice President", but
it was written in 18th-century English and uses spellings like "chuse"
and "encreased". In the 19th century, the 12th and 14th Amendments
used the spelling "Vice-President"; but in the 20th century, the 20th
and several later amendments went back to "Vice President".
Take your pick. I pick "vice-president".
Well, that is simply wrong. It is either Vice President or
Vice-President, it is never vice president nor vice-president.
What is the purpose of capitalizing it when the vice-presidency or the
vice-president is being discussed generally, without reference to
whoever's holding or has held the office?
The rule as I learned it is that the President and Vice President of the
US were always capitalized and any reference to the office or office
holder of previous office holder must always be capitalized.

Any other president (corporate, youth-group, sewing circle) is not
capitalized.
Post by bill van
Post by Lewis
Officially, it is not hyphenated.
I didn't know that, but a U.S. government site confirms it. I prefer the
hyphenated version.
--
It was a fifty-four with a mashed up door and a cheesy little amp with a
sign on the front said "Fender Champ" and a second-hand guitar it was a
Stratocaster with a whammy bar
bill van
2016-04-10 23:22:46 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by bill van
Post by Lewis
Post by Mark Brader
Post by e***@gmail.com
Hello everybody, I often see "vice" hyphenated ("vice-captain", for
example) but I rarely see it hyphenated in the context of the vice
president of the United States. Is there a rule on when the word should
or should not be hyphenated?
The office in the US was created by the adoption of their Constitution.
The original text of the constitution spells it "Vice President", but
it was written in 18th-century English and uses spellings like "chuse"
and "encreased". In the 19th century, the 12th and 14th Amendments
used the spelling "Vice-President"; but in the 20th century, the 20th
and several later amendments went back to "Vice President".
Take your pick. I pick "vice-president".
Well, that is simply wrong. It is either Vice President or
Vice-President, it is never vice president nor vice-president.
What is the purpose of capitalizing it when the vice-presidency or the
vice-president is being discussed generally, without reference to
whoever's holding or has held the office?
The rule as I learned it is that the President and Vice President of the
US were always capitalized and any reference to the office or office
holder of previous office holder must always be capitalized.
Any other president (corporate, youth-group, sewing circle) is not
capitalized.
Fortunately I'm not subject to U.S. rules. I'll happily continue to
lower-case those titles, except when they are attached to someone's name.
--
bill
Peter Moylan
2016-04-09 23:51:38 UTC
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On 2016-Apr-09 21:15, ***@gmail.com wrote:

[Very long line re-wrapped. You need to press "Enter" more often.]
Post by e***@gmail.com
Hello everybody, I often see "vice" hyphenated ("vice-captain", for
example) but I rarely see it hyphenated in the context of the vice
president of the United States. Is there a rule on when the word
should or should not be hyphenated?
My rule of thumb:
1. Write "Vice-President" when he or she is next in line
to the President.
2. Write "vice president" when referring to the person
in charge of vice.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
bill van
2016-04-10 01:44:43 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
[Very long line re-wrapped. You need to press "Enter" more often.]
Post by e***@gmail.com
Hello everybody, I often see "vice" hyphenated ("vice-captain", for
example) but I rarely see it hyphenated in the context of the vice
president of the United States. Is there a rule on when the word
should or should not be hyphenated?
1. Write "Vice-President" when he or she is next in line
to the President.
2. Write "vice president" when referring to the person
in charge of vice.
My last newspaper's style was to capitalize the title of a hyphenated
vice-president only in conjunction with his or her name. Vice-President
Joe Biden, but the vice-president. Some papers may also have capitalized
"the Vice-President" when the reference was clearly to the reigning vp.
("Reigning" seems wrong in this context, given how much power the
vice-president does not have.)
--
bill
v***@gmail.com
2017-04-19 09:18:10 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
[Very long line re-wrapped. You need to press "Enter" more often.]
Post by e***@gmail.com
Hello everybody, I often see "vice" hyphenated ("vice-captain", for
example) but I rarely see it hyphenated in the context of the vice
president of the United States. Is there a rule on when the word
should or should not be hyphenated?
1. Write "Vice-President" when he or she is next in line
to the President.
2. Write "vice president" when referring to the person
in charge of vice.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Makes complete sense! Thank you!
-Vishnu

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