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What's the best way to cite a proverb in a Sentence?
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b***@gmail.com
2017-10-11 11:38:41 UTC
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What's the best way to cite a proverb in a Sentence?
Peter Young
2017-10-11 14:15:55 UTC
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What's the best way to cite a proverb in a Sentence?
Just as you would cite anything else. I would use this style: "Empty
barrels make the most sound".

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Pt)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
b***@aol.com
2017-10-11 15:24:02 UTC
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What's the best way to cite a proverb in a Sentence?
It seems hard to cite a proverb in the sentence itself, but you can
bring it up separately with a phrase such as "As they say,..." to
illustrate your point.
b***@gmail.com
2017-10-11 21:19:27 UTC
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What's the best way to cite a proverb in a Sentence?
maybe cite was the wrong word —— when you should you not conspicuously put the proverb in quotes?
Jerry Friedman
2017-10-11 21:31:22 UTC
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What's the best way to cite a proverb in a Sentence?
maybe cite was the wrong word —— when you should you not conspicuously put the proverb in quotes?
Maybe when people will recognize it.

"Doe has written eloquently and copiously on this subject, since
empty barrels make the most sound, but Roe's simple discussion
deserves more attention."
--
Jerry Friedman
Dingbat
2017-10-16 02:59:18 UTC
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What's the best way to cite a proverb in a Sentence?
maybe cite was the wrong word —— when you should you not conspicuously put the proverb in quotes?
Maybe when people will recognize it.
"Doe has written eloquently and copiously on this subject, since
empty barrels make the most sound, but Roe's simple discussion
deserves more attention."
"Empty vessels" when I heard it.
CDB
2017-10-16 06:22:42 UTC
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What's the best way to cite a proverb in a Sentence?
There are proverbs, expressed as statements like the Biblical "Cast not
your pearls before swine", and there are mere proverbial expressions
that may be derived from them. It's neater and lighter when you don't
have to quote the whole statement.
Post by Dingbat
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by b***@gmail.com
maybe cite was the wrong word —— when you should you not
conspicuously put the proverb in quotes?
Usually. "For my critics, these pearls ...."
Post by Dingbat
Post by Jerry Friedman
Maybe when people will recognize it.
"Doe has written eloquently and copiously on this subject, since
empty barrels make the most sound, but Roe's simple discussion
deserves more attention."
"Empty vessels" when I heard it.
+1. Empty vessels make the most noise.
RH Draney
2017-10-16 07:30:05 UTC
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Post by CDB
There are proverbs, expressed as statements like the Biblical "Cast not
your pearls before swine", and there are mere proverbial expressions
that may be derived from them.  It's neater and lighter when you don't
have to quote the whole statement.
I remember encountering the phrase "like the proverbial bat out of hell"
in the writings of Alan King and wondering what proverb he was referring
to....r
Richard Yates
2017-10-16 14:06:37 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by CDB
There are proverbs, expressed as statements like the Biblical "Cast not
your pearls before swine", and there are mere proverbial expressions
that may be derived from them.  It's neater and lighter when you don't
have to quote the whole statement.
I remember encountering the phrase "like the proverbial bat out of hell"
in the writings of Alan King and wondering what proverb he was referring
to....r
It's because "clichéical" is not a word.

"Proverbial" usually seems only to signal that "I recognize that the
phrase is trite but since I cannot think of anything better I will
prepend 'proverbial' in order to show that I know it is trite and thus
insulate myself from criticism for lack of originality."
J. J. Lodder
2017-10-16 08:40:18 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
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What's the best way to cite a proverb in a Sentence?
maybe cite was the wrong word when you should you not conspicuously
put the proverb in quotes?
Maybe when people will recognize it.
"Doe has written eloquently and copiously on this subject, since
empty barrels make the most sound, but Roe's simple discussion
deserves more attention."
"Empty vessels" when I heard it.
/holle/lege/ vaten bommen/klinken het /hardst/luidst, to the Dutch.
(lit. /hollow/empty/ /barrels/casks/ /boom/sound/ the loudest.
Curiously the inverse is also used
'lege vaten klinken het holst'
(lit, empty barrels sound the most hollow)

We are all of us familiar with this law from usenet.
Three hollow barrels sounding together
usually suffice to destroy a newsgroup.

The mystery is that it hasn't happened in all cases.
In particular, how has alt.usage.english escaped this fate?

Jan
Peter Young
2017-10-11 21:32:08 UTC
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What's the best way to cite a proverb in a Sentence?
maybe cite was the wrong word —— when you should you not
conspicuously put the proverb in quotes?
Never? Why not? You're quoting it/

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Pt)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
b***@gmail.com
2017-10-14 17:03:49 UTC
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What's the best way to cite a proverb in a Sentence?
Without giving mine away unless I have to, could you cite or make up some examples of sentences written not on the nose to make their proverbial points. Thank you.
David Kleinecke
2017-10-14 17:42:45 UTC
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What's the best way to cite a proverb in a Sentence?
Without giving mine away unless I have to, could you cite or make up some examples of sentences written not on the nose to make their proverbial points. Thank you.
I dunno exactly what you want but perhaps

After many years he stumbled over that bucket.
b***@gmail.com
2017-10-14 19:59:25 UTC
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What's the best way to cite a proverb in a Sentence?
Without giving mine away unless I have to, could you cite or make up some examples of sentences written not on the nose to make their proverbial points. Thank you.
I dunno exactly what you want but perhaps
After many years he stumbled over that bucket.
not bad lol
Dingbat
2017-10-16 03:07:20 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
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What's the best way to cite a proverb in a Sentence?
Without giving mine away unless I have to, could you cite or make up some examples of sentences written not on the nose to make their proverbial points. Thank you.
I dunno exactly what you want but perhaps
After many years he stumbled over that bucket.
Was it his dinner pail?
https://forum.wordreference.com/threads/handed-in-his-dinner-pail.837944/

In the movie "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World", a man (played by Jimmy
Durante) straightens his leg when he dies, thereby kicking an empty metal
bucket ever so conveniently placed, sending it clattering down a hill.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It%27s_a_Mad,_Mad,_Mad,_Mad_World
RH Draney
2017-10-16 03:27:07 UTC
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In the movie "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World", a man (played by Jimmy
Durante) straightens his leg when he dies, thereby kicking an empty metal
bucket ever so conveniently placed, sending it clattering down a hill.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It%27s_a_Mad,_Mad,_Mad,_Mad_World
The filmmakers are to be commended for not then having one of the
characters comment "looks like he kicked the bucket"...(Mike Myers
showed no such restraint when he found it necessary to explain to his
audience the gag about "they're always after me lucky charms")....r
Ken Blake
2017-10-16 17:38:39 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
In the movie "It's a Mad, Mad, Mad, Mad World", a man (played by Jimmy
Durante) straightens his leg when he dies, thereby kicking an empty metal
bucket ever so conveniently placed, sending it clattering down a hill.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/It%27s_a_Mad,_Mad,_Mad,_Mad_World
The filmmakers are to be commended for not then having one of the
characters comment "looks like he kicked the bucket"...
Yes.
Post by RH Draney
(Mike Myers
showed no such restraint when he found it necessary to explain to his
audience the gag about "they're always after me lucky charms")....r
Similarly, Woody Allen showed no such restraint when he found it
necessary to have a voiceover explain to his audience the Deus ex
Machina near the end of "Mighty Aphrodite."

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