Discussion:
Gustav Adolf sagte: „Ich bin der König von Schweden gewesen“ und verschied.
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Hen Hanna
2017-08-09 20:25:44 UTC
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https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last_words
Ich bin der König von Schweden - gewesen.
Translation: I was the king of Sweden." Note: The German perfect of "be,"
"I have been," is constructed with a finite form of "be" (here "bin") and
its participle ("gewesen"). Without "gewesen" at the end, one would translate
"I am the king of Sweden." Thus the weight of the sentence rests on an
untranslatable bit of grammatical cleverness. Literally translated into
English, the quote would be "I am the king of Sweden - was." An equivalent
English phrasing in meaning would be "I am the king of Sweden… no more".
https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last_words



These were the speaker's [last words],
and it was a case of unintended humor.


Gustav Adolf sagte: „Ich bin der König von Schweden gewesen“ und verschied.


I had to look this up, because I had this
gory scene in my mind (which I couldn't shake off)

in which the King is slain, and
the soldier says : "gewesen"


There was a scene (and lines) just like it in SALT.


10 Most Disgustingly Gory Movie Scenes To Make You Cringe ...
https://moviepilot.com/posts/2408526
Harrison Hill
2017-08-09 20:41:04 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last_words
Ich bin der König von Schweden - gewesen.
Translation: I was the king of Sweden." Note: The German perfect of "be,"
"I have been," is constructed with a finite form of "be" (here "bin") and
its participle ("gewesen"). Without "gewesen" at the end, one would translate
"I am the king of Sweden." Thus the weight of the sentence rests on an
untranslatable bit of grammatical cleverness. Literally translated into
English, the quote would be "I am the king of Sweden - was." An equivalent
English phrasing in meaning would be "I am the king of Sweden… no more".
https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last_words
These were the speaker's [last words],
and it was a case of unintended humor.
Gustav Adolf sagte: „Ich bin der König von Schweden gewesen“ und verschied.
I had to look this up, because I had this
gory scene in my mind (which I couldn't shake off)
in which the King is slain, and
the soldier says : "gewesen"
There was a scene (and lines) just like it in SALT.
10 Most Disgustingly Gory Movie Scenes To Make You Cringe ...
https://moviepilot.com/posts/2408526
Why would anybody have any cause to say: "I was the
king of Sweden"? If you are then you are. If you
"was" then you "were" - and have since died. No doubt
Edward VIII will be back here to prove me wrong :(
Hen Hanna
2017-08-09 20:52:32 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last_words
Ich bin der König von Schweden - gewesen.
Translation: I was the king of Sweden." Note: The German perfect of "be,"
"I have been," is constructed with a finite form of "be" (here "bin") and
its participle ("gewesen"). Without "gewesen" at the end, one would translate
"I am the king of Sweden." Thus the weight of the sentence rests on an
untranslatable bit of grammatical cleverness. Literally translated into
English, the quote would be "I am the king of Sweden - was." An equivalent
English phrasing in meaning would be "I am the king of Sweden… no more".
https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last_words
These were the speaker's [last words],
and it was a case of unintended humor.
Gustav Adolf sagte: „Ich bin der König von Schweden gewesen“ und verschied.
I had to look this up, because I had this
gory scene in my mind (which I couldn't shake off)
in which the King is slain, and
the soldier says : "gewesen"
There was a scene (and lines) just like it in SALT.
10 Most Disgustingly Gory Movie Scenes To Make You Cringe ...
https://moviepilot.com/posts/2408526
Why would anybody have any cause to say: "I was the
king of Sweden"? If you are then you are. If you
"was" then you "were" - and have since died. No doubt
Edward VIII will be back here to prove me wrong :(
So in western history, for a man to be able to
correctly say
"I was the King of ..."
has been rare, an exception ?


How about
"I was a justice of the U.S. Sup Court" ?



Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Empire, and Emperor of India, from 20 January 1936 until his abdication on 11 December the same year.
Harrison Hill
2017-08-09 21:03:58 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last_words
Ich bin der König von Schweden - gewesen.
Translation: I was the king of Sweden." Note: The German perfect of "be,"
"I have been," is constructed with a finite form of "be" (here "bin") and
its participle ("gewesen"). Without "gewesen" at the end, one would translate
"I am the king of Sweden." Thus the weight of the sentence rests on an
untranslatable bit of grammatical cleverness. Literally translated into
English, the quote would be "I am the king of Sweden - was." An equivalent
English phrasing in meaning would be "I am the king of Sweden… no more".
https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last_words
These were the speaker's [last words],
and it was a case of unintended humor.
Gustav Adolf sagte: „Ich bin der König von Schweden gewesen“ und verschied.
I had to look this up, because I had this
gory scene in my mind (which I couldn't shake off)
in which the King is slain, and
the soldier says : "gewesen"
There was a scene (and lines) just like it in SALT.
10 Most Disgustingly Gory Movie Scenes To Make You Cringe ...
https://moviepilot.com/posts/2408526
Why would anybody have any cause to say: "I was the
king of Sweden"? If you are then you are. If you
"was" then you "were" - and have since died. No doubt
Edward VIII will be back here to prove me wrong :(
So in western history, for a man to be able to
correctly say
"I was the King of ..."
has been rare, an exception ?
How about
"I was a justice of the U.S. Sup Court" ?
Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Empire, and Emperor of India, from 20 January 1936 until his abdication on 11 December the same year.
You ought to know this stuff. Google it and find out
about it for yourself :)
Harrison Hill
2017-08-09 21:27:46 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last_words
Ich bin der König von Schweden - gewesen.
Translation: I was the king of Sweden." Note: The German perfect of "be,"
"I have been," is constructed with a finite form of "be" (here "bin") and
its participle ("gewesen"). Without "gewesen" at the end, one would translate
"I am the king of Sweden." Thus the weight of the sentence rests on an
untranslatable bit of grammatical cleverness. Literally translated into
English, the quote would be "I am the king of Sweden - was." An equivalent
English phrasing in meaning would be "I am the king of Sweden… no more".
https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last_words
These were the speaker's [last words],
and it was a case of unintended humor.
Gustav Adolf sagte: „Ich bin der König von Schweden gewesen“ und verschied.
I had to look this up, because I had this
gory scene in my mind (which I couldn't shake off)
in which the King is slain, and
the soldier says : "gewesen"
There was a scene (and lines) just like it in SALT.
10 Most Disgustingly Gory Movie Scenes To Make You Cringe ...
https://moviepilot.com/posts/2408526
Why would anybody have any cause to say: "I was the
king of Sweden"? If you are then you are. If you
"was" then you "were" - and have since died. No doubt
Edward VIII will be back here to prove me wrong :(
So in western history, for a man to be able to
correctly say
"I was the King of ..."
has been rare, an exception ?
How about
"I was a justice of the U.S. Sup Court" ?
Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Empire, and Emperor of India, from 20 January 1936 until his abdication on 11 December the same year.
You ought to know this stuff. Google it and find out
about it for yourself :)
I don't mean that in a horrible way. Learning
can only be done by learning. Learn, learn
learn. If you are young enough, Maths, Maths
Maths :)
Hen Hanna
2017-08-09 21:24:05 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last_words
Ich bin der König von Schweden - gewesen.
Translation: I was the king of Sweden." Note: The German perfect of "be,"
"I have been," is constructed with a finite form of "be" (here "bin") and
its participle ("gewesen"). Without "gewesen" at the end, one would translate
"I am the king of Sweden." Thus the weight of the sentence rests on an
untranslatable bit of grammatical cleverness. Literally translated into
English, the quote would be "I am the king of Sweden - was." An equivalent
English phrasing in meaning would be "I am the king of Sweden… no more".
https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last_words
These were the speaker's [last words],
and it was a case of unintended humor.
Gustav Adolf sagte: „Ich bin der König von Schweden gewesen“ und verschied.
I had to look this up, because I had this
gory scene in my mind (which I couldn't shake off)
in which the King is slain, and
the soldier says : "gewesen"
There was a scene (and lines) just like it in SALT.
10 Most Disgustingly Gory Movie Scenes To Make You Cringe ...
https://moviepilot.com/posts/2408526
Why would anybody have any cause to say: "I was the
king of Sweden"? If you are then you are. If you
"was" then you "were" - and have since died. No doubt
Edward VIII will be back here to prove me wrong :(
So in western history, for a man to be able to
correctly say
"I was the King of ..."
has been rare, an exception ?
How about
"I was a justice of the U.S. Sup Court" ?
Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Empire, and Emperor of India, from 20 January 1936 until his abdication on 11 December the same year.
The idea of
Kings (and US Sup Ct justices) who serve until death
is pretty scary.

( think North Korea )

I hope to see a US Sup Ct justice who goes wacko/senile
to foster public sentiment toward encouraging retirement.
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Hen Hanna
Justices have perpetuated the tradition of longevity of tenure. Recently, Justice John Paul Stevens served for 34 years before retiring in 2010 as the fourth longest serving Justice in the Court’s history, just barely missing the third longest record of service held by Justice Hugo Black, who served for 34 years and one month prior to his retirement in 1971. The record for length of service is held by Justice William O. Douglas, who retired on November 12, 1975, after serving a total of 36 years and six months. He surpassed the previously held record of Justice Stephen J. Field, who served for 34 years and six months from 1863 to 1897.
Horace LaBadie
2017-08-09 21:46:57 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Harrison Hill
https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last words
Ich bin der König von Schweden - gewesen.
Translation: I was the king of Sweden." Note: The German perfect of "be,"
"I have been," is constructed with a finite form of "be" (here "bin") and
its participle ("gewesen"). Without "gewesen" at the end, one would
translate
"I am the king of Sweden." Thus the weight of the sentence rests on an
untranslatable bit of grammatical cleverness. Literally translated into
English, the quote would be "I am the king of Sweden - was." An
equivalent
English phrasing in meaning would be "I am the king of Sweden
 no
more".
https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last words
These were the speaker's [last words],
and it was a case of unintended humor.
Gustav Adolf sagte: „Ich bin der König von Schweden gewesen“ und
verschied.
I had to look this up, because I had this
gory scene in my mind (which I couldn't shake off)
in which the King is slain, and
the soldier says : "gewesen"
There was a scene (and lines) just like it in SALT.
10 Most Disgustingly Gory Movie Scenes To Make You Cringe ...
https://moviepilot.com/posts/2408526
Why would anybody have any cause to say: "I was the
king of Sweden"? If you are then you are. If you
"was" then you "were" - and have since died. No doubt
Edward VIII will be back here to prove me wrong :(
So in western history, for a man to be able to
correctly say
"I was the King of ..."
has been rare, an exception ?
How about
"I was a justice of the U.S. Sup Court" ?
Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; 23 June
1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the
British Empire, and Emperor of India, from 20 January 1936 until his
abdication on 11 December the same year.
The idea of
Kings (and US Sup Ct justices) who serve until death
is pretty scary.
( think North Korea )
I hope to see a US Sup Ct justice who goes wacko/senile
to foster public sentiment toward encouraging retirement.
Then you are ignorant of the purpose of a lifetime appointment -- to
place the sitting justices beyond the political pressures of the moment.
Unlike presidents and members of Congress, they are not subject to the
whims of the public or members of the other two co-equal branches of the
government. Ideally, they can be impartial. (Ideally.) And justices'
ideas can and sometimes do evolve over time.

Not to say that they are impervious to age or illness. William O.
Douglas was probably gaga at the end. Rehnquist was impaired by
medication for a long time. But there are eight other justices.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-08-10 02:43:50 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last_words
Ich bin der König von Schweden - gewesen.
Translation: I was the king of Sweden." Note: The German perfect of "be,"
"I have been," is constructed with a finite form of "be" (here "bin") and
its participle ("gewesen"). Without "gewesen" at the end, one would translate
"I am the king of Sweden." Thus the weight of the sentence rests on an
untranslatable bit of grammatical cleverness. Literally translated into
English, the quote would be "I am the king of Sweden - was." An equivalent
English phrasing in meaning would be "I am the king of Sweden… no more".
https://en.m.wikiquote.org/wiki/Last_words
These were the speaker's [last words],
and it was a case of unintended humor.
Gustav Adolf sagte: „Ich bin der König von Schweden gewesen“ und verschied.
I had to look this up, because I had this
gory scene in my mind (which I couldn't shake off)
in which the King is slain, and
the soldier says : "gewesen"
There was a scene (and lines) just like it in SALT.
10 Most Disgustingly Gory Movie Scenes To Make You Cringe ...
https://moviepilot.com/posts/2408526
Why would anybody have any cause to say: "I was the
king of Sweden"? If you are then you are. If you
"was" then you "were" - and have since died. No doubt
Edward VIII will be back here to prove me wrong :(
So in western history, for a man to be able to
correctly say
"I was the King of ..."
has been rare, an exception ?
How about
"I was a justice of the U.S. Sup Court" ?
Edward VIII (Edward Albert Christian George Andrew Patrick David; 23 June 1894 – 28 May 1972) was King of the United Kingdom and the Dominions of the British Empire, and Emperor of India, from 20 January 1936 until his abdication on 11 December the same year.
The idea of
Kings (and US Sup Ct justices) who serve until death
is pretty scary.
( think North Korea )
I hope to see a US Sup Ct justice who goes wacko/senile
to foster public sentiment toward encouraging retirement.
Few Justices die before retiring.
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Harrison Hill
Post by Hen Hanna
Justices have perpetuated the tradition of longevity of tenure. Recently, Justice John Paul Stevens served for 34 years before retiring in 2010 as the fourth longest serving Justice in the Court’s history, just barely missing the third longest record of service held by Justice Hugo Black, who served for 34 years and one month prior to his retirement in 1971. The record for length of service is held by Justice William O. Douglas, who retired on November 12, 1975, after serving a total of 36 years and six months. He surpassed the previously held record of Justice Stephen J. Field, who served for 34 years and six months from 1863 to 1897.
Douglas was not fit for service on the Court in his last years, but he tried
desperately to hang on until a Democratic president would be elected -- as
happened in 1976. Thurgood Marshall, too, stayed longer than he should have,
and unfortunately Clarence Thomas was the result.

Justice Ginsburg shows no signs of willingness to quit: she's had some health
scares but nothing has impaired her mental acuity.
Quinn C
2017-08-10 17:29:50 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
The idea of
Kings (and US Sup Ct justices) who serve until death
is pretty scary.
( think North Korea )
I hope to see a US Sup Ct justice who goes wacko/senile
to foster public sentiment toward encouraging retirement.
Few Justices die before retiring.
For those few, how did they manage to retire?
--
The Eskimoes had fifty-two names for snow because it was
important to them, there ought to be as many for love.
-- Margaret Atwood, Surfacing (novel), p.106
Peter T. Daniels
2017-08-10 20:15:40 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
The idea of
Kings (and US Sup Ct justices) who serve until death
is pretty scary.
( think North Korea )
I hope to see a US Sup Ct justice who goes wacko/senile
to foster public sentiment toward encouraging retirement.
Few Justices die before retiring.
For those few, how did they manage to retire?
They didn't.

Douglas didn't retire, Scalia didn't retire.
Quinn C
2017-08-11 19:41:17 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
The idea of
Kings (and US Sup Ct justices) who serve until death
is pretty scary.
( think North Korea )
I hope to see a US Sup Ct justice who goes wacko/senile
to foster public sentiment toward encouraging retirement.
Few Justices die before retiring.
For those few, how did they manage to retire?
They didn't.
Douglas didn't retire, Scalia didn't retire.
I knew that, of course. I just recognized for a moment the oddness
of saying they died *before* retiring, when in fact they didn't do
the "later" thing.

We wouldn't say it in just any case - "he died before marrying"
for an eternal bachelor? No, that only works when a wedding was
planned, or expected by the speaker.

So does the original "before" express those judges were due to
retire?

OTOH, I see no problem when it's "before ever", as in "he died
before ever seeing his father again" (so it doesn't even have to
be a once-in-a-lifetime thing.)
--
Woman is a pair of ovaries with a human being attached, whereas
man is a human being furnished with a pair of testes.
-- Rudolf Virchow
Peter T. Daniels
2017-08-11 20:54:39 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
The idea of
Kings (and US Sup Ct justices) who serve until death
is pretty scary.
( think North Korea )
I hope to see a US Sup Ct justice who goes wacko/senile
to foster public sentiment toward encouraging retirement.
Few Justices die before retiring.
For those few, how did they manage to retire?
They didn't.
Douglas didn't retire, Scalia didn't retire.
I knew that, of course. I just recognized for a moment the oddness
of saying they died *before* retiring, when in fact they didn't do
the "later" thing.
We wouldn't say it in just any case - "he died before marrying"
for an eternal bachelor? No, that only works when a wedding was
planned, or expected by the speaker.
So does the original "before" express those judges were due to
retire?
"He died before he could retire" makes it sound like an accident. Or the setup
for an Oscar Wilde quip.

"He intended to retire [when ...] but didn't have the opportunity."
Post by Quinn C
OTOH, I see no problem when it's "before ever", as in "he died
before ever seeing his father again" (so it doesn't even have to
be a once-in-a-lifetime thing.)
Horace LaBadie
2017-08-11 21:08:01 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Quinn C
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Hen Hanna
The idea of
Kings (and US Sup Ct justices) who serve until death
is pretty scary.
( think North Korea )
I hope to see a US Sup Ct justice who goes wacko/senile
to foster public sentiment toward encouraging retirement.
Few Justices die before retiring.
For those few, how did they manage to retire?
They didn't.
Douglas didn't retire, Scalia didn't retire.
I knew that, of course. I just recognized for a moment the oddness
of saying they died *before* retiring, when in fact they didn't do
the "later" thing.
We wouldn't say it in just any case - "he died before marrying"
for an eternal bachelor? No, that only works when a wedding was
planned, or expected by the speaker.
So does the original "before" express those judges were due to
retire?
"He died before he could retire" makes it sound like an accident. Or the setup
for an Oscar Wilde quip.
"The after-dinner conversation was deadly dull."
Post by Peter T. Daniels
"He intended to retire [when ...] but didn't have the opportunity."
Post by Quinn C
OTOH, I see no problem when it's "before ever", as in "he died
before ever seeing his father again" (so it doesn't even have to
be a once-in-a-lifetime thing.)
Peter Moylan
2017-08-10 03:46:41 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Hen Hanna
I hope to see a US Sup Ct justice who goes wacko/senile
to foster public sentiment toward encouraging retirement.
In the case of some of them: how could you tell?
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Lewis
2017-08-10 08:54:13 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Hen Hanna
I hope to see a US Sup Ct justice who goes wacko/senile
to foster public sentiment toward encouraging retirement.
In the case of some of them: how could you tell?
Some justices have retired, but I don't know of any who went senile
while on the court.

Of course, Thomas could be senile and no one would know as all he does
is sleep. I think I heard that recently he asked his first question
during a proceeding.
--
I CAN'T SEE DEAD PEOPLE Bart chalkboard Ep. BABF05
Peter T. Daniels
2017-08-10 11:53:11 UTC
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Raw Message
Post by Lewis
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Hen Hanna
I hope to see a US Sup Ct justice who goes wacko/senile
to foster public sentiment toward encouraging retirement.
In the case of some of them: how could you tell?
Some justices have retired, but I don't know of any who went senile
while on the court.
A pity Screwy Lewie doesn't read what's posted in this thread.
Post by Lewis
Of course, Thomas could be senile and no one would know as all he does
is sleep. I think I heard that recently he asked his first question
during a proceeding.
FSVO "recently." It was two or three years ago.
Whiskers
2017-08-10 15:49:32 UTC
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Lewis
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Hen Hanna
I hope to see a US Sup Ct justice who goes wacko/senile
to foster public sentiment toward encouraging retirement.
In the case of some of them: how could you tell?
Some justices have retired, but I don't know of any who went senile
while on the court.
A pity Screwy Lewie doesn't read what's posted in this thread.
Post by Lewis
Of course, Thomas could be senile and no one would know as all he does
is sleep. I think I heard that recently he asked his first question
during a proceeding.
FSVO "recently." It was two or three years ago.
Has he got an answer yet?
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Peter T. Daniels
2017-08-10 16:03:29 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Lewis
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Hen Hanna
I hope to see a US Sup Ct justice who goes wacko/senile
to foster public sentiment toward encouraging retirement.
In the case of some of them: how could you tell?
Some justices have retired, but I don't know of any who went senile
while on the court.
A pity Screwy Lewie doesn't read what's posted in this thread.
Post by Lewis
Of course, Thomas could be senile and no one would know as all he does
is sleep. I think I heard that recently he asked his first question
during a proceeding.
FSVO "recently." It was two or three years ago.
Has he got an answer yet?
It would be unwise of the arguing attorney(s) not to answer a direct question
from the Bench!

But I don't recall that Nina Totenberg included the response in her flabbergasted
(BrE gobsmacked) report.
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