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The Hound of the Baskervilles - Pulp! The Classics
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Hen Hanna
2018-06-05 21:11:43 UTC
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The Hound of the Baskervilles - Pulp! The Classics

www.pulptheclassics.com/hound-of-the-baskervilles


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they both look familiar, but I can't place them. Who are they?



also,
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"


is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Hen Hanna
2018-06-06 05:51:42 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
The Hound of the Baskervilles - Pulp! The Classics
www.pulptheclassics.com/hound-of-the-baskervilles
http://www.pulptheclassics.com/images/large/9781843441229.jpg
http://img2.imagesbn.com/p/9781843441229_p0_v1_s260x420.JPG
they both look familiar, but I can't place them. Who are they?
also,
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
no guesses? one of them looks like this pic:

Loading Image...



he said "Be afraid, Be very afraid"
Loading Image...

i wonder how much he got for this cover.
like $10,000 ? HH
Don P
2018-06-09 16:04:35 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
--
Don Phillipson
Carlsbad Springs
(Ottawa, Canada)
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-06-09 16:21:33 UTC
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Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
--
Barbara Woodhouse, more famous for 'no bad dogs, only bad owners',
a philosophy which, along with reward not punishment, is now the
basis of all professional dog training (or should I say 'owner training'?)
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-06-09 16:42:35 UTC
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On Sat, 9 Jun 2018 09:21:33 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
--
Barbara Woodhouse, more famous for 'no bad dogs, only bad owners',
a philosophy which, along with reward not punishment, is now the
basis of all professional dog training (or should I say 'owner training'?)
An approach which seems to have been carried over into daeling with
child behaviour problems. I don't think it has been expressed this way
but it could be 'no bad children, only bad parents'.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
J. J. Lodder
2018-06-10 09:45:15 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 9 Jun 2018 09:21:33 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
--
Barbara Woodhouse, more famous for 'no bad dogs, only bad owners',
a philosophy which, along with reward not punishment, is now the
basis of all professional dog training (or should I say 'owner training'?)
An approach which seems to have been carried over into daeling with
child behaviour problems. I don't think it has been expressed this way
but it could be 'no bad children, only bad parents'.
Blaming the victims is always a good tactic,
for know it alls.
Like telling parents that having an autistic child is all their fault,
to add feeling guilty about it to their problems.

The 'tabula rasa' model is just plain wrong.
Some dogs and children will have problems
also with the best of care,

Jan
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-06-10 11:21:07 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 9 Jun 2018 09:21:33 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
--
Barbara Woodhouse, more famous for 'no bad dogs, only bad owners',
a philosophy which, along with reward not punishment, is now the
basis of all professional dog training (or should I say 'owner training'?)
An approach which seems to have been carried over into daeling with
child behaviour problems. I don't think it has been expressed this way
but it could be 'no bad children, only bad parents'.
Blaming the victims is always a good tactic,
for know it alls.
Like telling parents that having an autistic child is all their fault,
to add feeling guilty about it to their problems.
The 'tabula rasa' model is just plain wrong.
Some dogs and children will have problems
also with the best of care,
Victims? Amazing how one word can completely undo your own
argument!

Nobody is telling the parents of autistic children that it is their
fault, nor is anybody promoting the 'tabula rasa' model. If you
think they are you've completely misunderstood the approach.
J. J. Lodder
2018-06-10 13:35:57 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 9 Jun 2018 09:21:33 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
--
Barbara Woodhouse, more famous for 'no bad dogs, only bad owners', a
philosophy which, along with reward not punishment, is now the basis
of all professional dog training (or should I say 'owner training'?)
An approach which seems to have been carried over into daeling with
child behaviour problems. I don't think it has been expressed this way
but it could be 'no bad children, only bad parents'.
Blaming the victims is always a good tactic,
for know it alls.
Like telling parents that having an autistic child is all their fault,
to add feeling guilty about it to their problems.
The 'tabula rasa' model is just plain wrong.
Some dogs and children will have problems
also with the best of care,
Victims? Amazing how one word can completely undo your own
argument!
Nobody is telling the parents of autistic children that it is their
fault, nor is anybody promoting the 'tabula rasa' model. If you
think they are you've completely misunderstood the approach.
see
<https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-40717652>
for example.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-06-10 15:16:53 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 9 Jun 2018 09:21:33 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
--
Barbara Woodhouse, more famous for 'no bad dogs, only bad owners', a
philosophy which, along with reward not punishment, is now the basis
of all professional dog training (or should I say 'owner training'?)
An approach which seems to have been carried over into daeling with
child behaviour problems. I don't think it has been expressed this way
but it could be 'no bad children, only bad parents'.
Blaming the victims is always a good tactic,
for know it alls.
Like telling parents that having an autistic child is all their fault,
to add feeling guilty about it to their problems.
The 'tabula rasa' model is just plain wrong.
Some dogs and children will have problems
also with the best of care,
Victims? Amazing how one word can completely undo your own
argument!
Nobody is telling the parents of autistic children that it is their
fault, nor is anybody promoting the 'tabula rasa' model. If you
think they are you've completely misunderstood the approach.
see
<https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-40717652>
for example.
Really? For example of what? The existence of stupid people doing
stupid things on account of they're being stupid? I think we can
take that as read. I'm baffled as to how it relates to this discussion
though. Are you seriously suggesting that the motivation for
these horrors is a fully developed philosophical approach to child
rearing when everything points to ignorance and prejudice instead?
Kerr-Mudd,John
2018-06-13 09:05:41 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 9 Jun 2018 09:21:33 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage,
popularized by the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of
forgotten name) in the 1960s, and recurring in films etc.
--
Barbara Woodhouse, more famous for 'no bad dogs, only bad
owners', a philosophy which, along with reward not punishment,
is now the basis of all professional dog training (or should I
say 'owner training'?)
An approach which seems to have been carried over into daeling
with child behaviour problems. I don't think it has been
expressed this way but it could be 'no bad children, only bad
parents'.
Blaming the victims is always a good tactic,
for know it alls.
Like telling parents that having an autistic child is all their
fault, to add feeling guilty about it to their problems.
The 'tabula rasa' model is just plain wrong.
Some dogs and children will have problems
also with the best of care,
Victims? Amazing how one word can completely undo your own
argument!
Nobody is telling the parents of autistic children that it is their
fault, nor is anybody promoting the 'tabula rasa' model. If you
think they are you've completely misunderstood the approach.
see
<https://www.bbc.com/news/uk-wales-40717652>
for example.
I felt sure this would have been the Paediatrician forced to move due to
the local yobs failing to understand the title:

http://news.bbc.co.uk/1/hi/wales/901723.stm
(gosh 18 years ago)
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-06-10 15:33:25 UTC
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Post by J. J. Lodder
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 9 Jun 2018 09:21:33 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
--
Barbara Woodhouse, more famous for 'no bad dogs, only bad owners',
a philosophy which, along with reward not punishment, is now the
basis of all professional dog training (or should I say 'owner training'?)
An approach which seems to have been carried over into daeling with
child behaviour problems. I don't think it has been expressed this way
but it could be 'no bad children, only bad parents'.
Blaming the victims is always a good tactic,
for know it alls.
Like telling parents that having an autistic child is all their fault,
to add feeling guilty about it to their problems.
It is not a case of blaming the parents.

It is a pragmatic approach. The behaviour of a child is partly a
reaction to the behaviour of the parents (or other carers).

Parents can be taught how to behave towards a child so as to improve its
behaviour.

There was TV series in UK and US versions titled _Supernanny_. There are
other international versions.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supernanny

The show features professional nanny Jo Frost, who devotes each
episode to helping a family where the parents are struggling with
their child-rearing. Through instruction and observation, she shows
the parents alternative ways to discipline their children and regain
order in their households.

Jo Frost calls in outside experts when necessary, such as for children
with Down Syndrome, Autism, or other conditions, or for parents with
problems such as alcoholism.
Post by J. J. Lodder
The 'tabula rasa' model is just plain wrong.
Some dogs and children will have problems
also with the best of care,
Jan
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-10 19:04:57 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
There was TV series in UK and US versions titled _Supernanny_. There are
other international versions.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Supernanny
The show features professional nanny Jo Frost, who devotes each
episode to helping a family where the parents are struggling with
their child-rearing. Through instruction and observation, she shows
the parents alternative ways to discipline their children and regain
order in their households.
I saw a couple of episodes. It was truly horrifying.
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Jo Frost calls in outside experts when necessary, such as for children
with Down Syndrome, Autism, or other conditions, or for parents with
problems such as alcoholism.
More recently, the "Tiger Mom" phenomenon became known. A Chinese-American
woman wrote a best-seller about what would (I think later) also be called
"helicopter parents" -- supervising every waking, and probably sleeping,
moment of the child's life, enrolling them in all sorts of non-school
sports and artistic and scientific activities; supposedly this was how
old-fashioned Chinese mothers produced such well-behaved offspring and
Americans would do well to emulate them.
Peter Young
2018-06-09 16:31:31 UTC
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Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
Barbara Woodhouse.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Pt)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Hen Hanna
2018-06-09 19:07:25 UTC
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Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
thanks. i'd never heard the term [walkies] (for dogs)


in another group someone gave me the answer...
( about the 2 actors )
i thnk the drawing's kinda bad. HH
Tony Cooper
2018-06-09 20:19:03 UTC
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On Sat, 9 Jun 2018 12:07:25 -0700 (PDT), Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
thanks. i'd never heard the term [walkies] (for dogs)
The term is used in the US, but not at all a class marker. There are
just some people who use words like that, and they are identifiable by
group.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Tony Cooper
2018-06-09 20:24:04 UTC
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On Sat, 09 Jun 2018 16:19:03 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 9 Jun 2018 12:07:25 -0700 (PDT), Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
thanks. i'd never heard the term [walkies] (for dogs)
The term is used in the US, but not at all a class marker. There are
just some people who use words like that, and they are identifiable by
group.
"they are *not* identifiable by group".
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Katy Jennison
2018-06-09 22:13:43 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Sat, 9 Jun 2018 12:07:25 -0700 (PDT), Hen Hanna
Post by Hen Hanna
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
thanks. i'd never heard the term [walkies] (for dogs)
The term is used in the US, but not at all a class marker. There are
just some people who use words like that, and they are identifiable by
group.
I don't think of it as a class marker here, either, but I'm not a
dog-owner so what do I know.
--
Katy Jennison
Reinhold {Rey} Aman
2018-06-10 00:59:24 UTC
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Katy Jennison wrote:
[walkies]
Post by Katy Jennison
I don't think of it as a class marker here, either,
but I'm not a dog-owner so what do I know.
I first heard "walkies" in Monty Python's "Mr Neutron",
Episode 44:

Trapper: He wants to go walkies.
Carpenter: Walkies?
Trapper: Yeah, he's right into it today -
d'you mind taking him for walkies?

[Later] Dog: I gotta go walkies again.

<http://www.ibras.dk/montypython/episode44.htm#2>
--
~~~ Reinhold {Rey} Aman ~~~
occam
2018-06-09 21:38:19 UTC
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Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
           "Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies]  more common in the UK ?    HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
Barbara Woodhouse.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Woodhouse
Sam Plusnet
2018-06-09 22:40:03 UTC
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Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
           "Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies]  more common in the UK ?    HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
Not too sure I agree on the "strictly upper and middle class" aspect.

I hear it as part of the "baby talk" that people often use towards pets,
& I don't think it is class specific.
--
Sam Plusnet
Janet
2018-06-09 23:08:17 UTC
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Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage,
Yes, but used by all classes.
Post by Don P
popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Woodhouse

" Her 1980 television series Training Dogs the Woodhouse Way made her a
household name in the UK. Among her catch-phrases were "walkies" and
"sit!"

Janet.
Tony Cooper
2018-06-09 23:41:05 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage,
Yes, but used by all classes.
Post by Don P
popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Woodhouse
" Her 1980 television series Training Dogs the Woodhouse Way made her a
household name in the UK. Among her catch-phrases were "walkies" and
"sit!"
I'm sure she's a good dog trainer, and a good person in general, but
it's a bit sad that she's remembered as the person who popularized
"walkies".

People who say "walkies" are the type who tend to kiss their dog on
the mouth...err...muzzle. Yech!
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-06-10 10:29:38 UTC
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On Sat, 09 Jun 2018 19:41:05 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage,
Yes, but used by all classes.
Post by Don P
popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Woodhouse
" Her 1980 television series Training Dogs the Woodhouse Way made her a
household name in the UK. Among her catch-phrases were "walkies" and
"sit!"
I'm sure she's a good dog trainer, and a good person in general, but
it's a bit sad that she's remembered as the person who popularized
"walkies".
She's the person who popularised dog training.
Post by Tony Cooper
People who say "walkies" are the type who tend to kiss their dog on
the mouth...err...muzzle. Yech!
Maybe some of them.

"walkies" is a "command" to a dog, as is "sit".

The word "walkies" is sufficiently distinctive that a dog can learn to
recognise and respond to it.

The OED distinguishes between its use as a command and its childish use
although there is overlap. The childish use seems to have come later.

walkies, n.

1. A walk (with a dog). Frequently used as an invitation or command
to go for a walk. Also (humorous) in speaking to a person.
1929 H. Williamson Pathway iv. 79 ‘Walkees?’ said Maddison to
his dog, who jumped up at him, while the other dogs stirred out of
various lazy attitudes.
1939 A. Thirkell Before Lunch iv. 93 ‘Master's stick for
walkies,’ said Mr. Middleton. ‘Fetch stick for walkies.’
1942 Times 17 Feb. 2/1 (advt.) Once the blackout is up—no more
walkies, no games with the Airedale up the road, nothing to do but
yawn.
1960 J. Stroud Shorn Lamb x. 119 I bring Gorm along here
sometimes, for his walkies.
1981 Sunday Express 26 Apr. (Colour Suppl.) 13/1 Before long the
subject of walkies comes up. People are obsessed, Mrs Woodhouse
says, with taking dogs out for walks.
1985 D. Lucie Progress ii. ii, in Fashion, Progress, Hard
Feelings, Doing the Business (1991) 145 Come along, Angela [sc.
a woman]. Walkies.
2005 T. Budworth Wilby ix. 71 Here boys! Walkies before it gets
too hot!

2. to go walkies.
a. In childish language: to go for a walk.
1937 G. Frankau Dangerous Yrs. lvi. 402 They were on the
embankment by then. Nan stopped the perambulator. Its occupant
lisped, ‘Can I go walkies, mummy?’
1960 B. M. Charleston Stud. Emotional & Affective Means of
Expression Mod. Eng. v. 179 Did he want to go walkies, then?
1962 S. J. Perelman in New Yorker 11 Aug. 20/1 [A] well-groomed
dog called Sternroc Sticky Wicket yesterday went walkies with his
mistress.
1976 M. Lovell Your Growing Child i. 9 Mister sun's come out,
Tommy! Want to go walkies? Hold handy-pandy and go walkies.
2003 S. Hartmann-Kent Your Dog & Your Baby (ed. 5) 108 Most dogs
get very excited when it's time to go walkies. They think that
they're going hunting.

b. fig. Chiefly of a thing: to disappear, go missing. Cf. walk v.
13a.
1971 ....
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-06-10 12:16:07 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 09 Jun 2018 19:41:05 -0400, Tony Cooper
[ … ]
Could someone who understands clucking sounds better than I do suggest
a plausible reason why several recent clucks contain "Pulp!" in the
subject line? What is it supposed to mean?
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2018-06-10 12:32:21 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Could someone who understands clucking sounds better than I do suggest
a plausible reason why several recent clucks contain "Pulp!" in the
subject line? What is it supposed to mean?
It would be easy enough for you to click the link that was provided.

HH came across a pulp-fiction edition of a Sherlock Holmes novel.
Tony Cooper
2018-06-10 13:53:33 UTC
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On Sun, 10 Jun 2018 11:29:38 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 09 Jun 2018 19:41:05 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage,
Yes, but used by all classes.
Post by Don P
popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Woodhouse
" Her 1980 television series Training Dogs the Woodhouse Way made her a
household name in the UK. Among her catch-phrases were "walkies" and
"sit!"
I'm sure she's a good dog trainer, and a good person in general, but
it's a bit sad that she's remembered as the person who popularized
"walkies".
She's the person who popularised dog training.
Post by Tony Cooper
People who say "walkies" are the type who tend to kiss their dog on
the mouth...err...muzzle. Yech!
Maybe some of them.
"walkies" is a "command" to a dog, as is "sit".
It may be, but it's never been used in that way in my hearing. And,
I've heard the word used quite a bit over the years.

What does "walkies" command a dog to do? If it is a command to get
very excited and prance about in joyous anticipation of new smells to
sniff, then just picking up the leash in our dog's sight is a visual
"walkies" command.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-06-10 15:19:12 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 10 Jun 2018 11:29:38 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 09 Jun 2018 19:41:05 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage,
Yes, but used by all classes.
Post by Don P
popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Woodhouse
" Her 1980 television series Training Dogs the Woodhouse Way made her a
household name in the UK. Among her catch-phrases were "walkies" and
"sit!"
I'm sure she's a good dog trainer, and a good person in general, but
it's a bit sad that she's remembered as the person who popularized
"walkies".
She's the person who popularised dog training.
Post by Tony Cooper
People who say "walkies" are the type who tend to kiss their dog on
the mouth...err...muzzle. Yech!
Maybe some of them.
"walkies" is a "command" to a dog, as is "sit".
It may be, but it's never been used in that way in my hearing. And,
I've heard the word used quite a bit over the years.
What does "walkies" command a dog to do? If it is a command to get
very excited and prance about in joyous anticipation of new smells to
sniff, then just picking up the leash in our dog's sight is a visual
"walkies" command.
--
Well quite. It's like saying that "ice cream" is a command to children.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-06-10 16:06:40 UTC
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On Sun, 10 Jun 2018 08:19:12 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 10 Jun 2018 11:29:38 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 09 Jun 2018 19:41:05 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage,
Yes, but used by all classes.
Post by Don P
popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Woodhouse
" Her 1980 television series Training Dogs the Woodhouse Way made her a
household name in the UK. Among her catch-phrases were "walkies" and
"sit!"
I'm sure she's a good dog trainer, and a good person in general, but
it's a bit sad that she's remembered as the person who popularized
"walkies".
She's the person who popularised dog training.
Post by Tony Cooper
People who say "walkies" are the type who tend to kiss their dog on
the mouth...err...muzzle. Yech!
Maybe some of them.
"walkies" is a "command" to a dog, as is "sit".
It may be, but it's never been used in that way in my hearing. And,
I've heard the word used quite a bit over the years.
What does "walkies" command a dog to do? If it is a command to get
very excited and prance about in joyous anticipation of new smells to
sniff, then just picking up the leash in our dog's sight is a visual
"walkies" command.
--
Well quite. It's like saying that "ice cream" is a command to children.
I was using the dictionary description of "walkies" as a "command or
instruction".

It is more a case of a stimulus given so that the dog will respond to it
in a conditioned manner. (C.f. Ivan Pavlov and his dogs.)
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Tony Cooper
2018-06-10 21:03:55 UTC
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On Sun, 10 Jun 2018 17:06:40 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sun, 10 Jun 2018 08:19:12 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Tony Cooper
On Sun, 10 Jun 2018 11:29:38 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
On Sat, 09 Jun 2018 19:41:05 -0400, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage,
Yes, but used by all classes.
Post by Don P
popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Woodhouse
" Her 1980 television series Training Dogs the Woodhouse Way made her a
household name in the UK. Among her catch-phrases were "walkies" and
"sit!"
I'm sure she's a good dog trainer, and a good person in general, but
it's a bit sad that she's remembered as the person who popularized
"walkies".
She's the person who popularised dog training.
Post by Tony Cooper
People who say "walkies" are the type who tend to kiss their dog on
the mouth...err...muzzle. Yech!
Maybe some of them.
"walkies" is a "command" to a dog, as is "sit".
It may be, but it's never been used in that way in my hearing. And,
I've heard the word used quite a bit over the years.
What does "walkies" command a dog to do? If it is a command to get
very excited and prance about in joyous anticipation of new smells to
sniff, then just picking up the leash in our dog's sight is a visual
"walkies" command.
--
Well quite. It's like saying that "ice cream" is a command to children.
I was using the dictionary description of "walkies" as a "command or
instruction".
It is more a case of a stimulus given so that the dog will respond to it
in a conditioned manner. (C.f. Ivan Pavlov and his dogs.)
Maybe I'm missing something, but that doesn't seem to make sense to
me. Commands like "Sit", "Heel", "Stay", etc are commands that elicit
certain responses. The dog does whatever the dog has been trained to
do on hearing that command.

But what is the response expected from "Walkies"? Will the dog go
fetch its leash, go to the door, check to see if it's raining?

In my experience in owning dogs, it's the owner - not the dog - who
has the conditioned response. The dog will go to the door and stand
there with its nose in the crack between the door and the frame, go
sit or stand by the door, bark at the owner, or otherwise call to the
attention of the owner that it need to go outside.

The conditioned response on the dog's part is reacting to seeing the
leash brought out. That's a signal that it will be walked, but a
visual signal and not a command.

In the case of the huge Catahoula Leopard Dog that we watch when my
son is out of town, the dog responds to the sound of the chain link
leash. He can hear it rattle three rooms away, and will come bounding
to the door. If Beaux wants to prompt me to get the chain out, he
stands patiently by the door until I notice.

On this subject, Beaux is fitted with a shock collar, and has been for
three years. When the remote is pushed, the collar either produces a
beep sound or a beep sound and a mild shock. The beep-and-shock
button hasn't been used for almost three years. At the beep, Beaux
will stop and sit.

Beaux has a habit of bolting out the door - knocking anyone aside who
is going out the door - and taking off. A press of the beep button
and Beaux will stop, sit, and wait until being captured. The problem
is that I haven't been properly trained to keep the remote handy when
I go out a door.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mark Brader
2018-06-11 06:45:21 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Maybe I'm missing something, but that doesn't seem to make sense to
me. Commands like "Sit", "Heel", "Stay", etc are commands that elicit
certain responses. The dog does whatever the dog has been trained to
do on hearing that command.
But what is the response expected from "Walkies"?
To expect to go for a walk, I think.
Post by Tony Cooper
In my experience in owning dogs, it's the owner - not the dog - who
has the conditioned response...
Clive James in "Glued to the Box", found via Google Books:

# If you say this word to the dog it will go for a walk. So would I,
# by God, but that is a side issue. What matters now is the effect
# produced by [Barbara] Woodhouse when she gives instructions to a
# dog, to its owner, or to both simultaneously. 'Walkies! WALKIES!
# Go and... TALK!'
#
# This last order is directed to the owner, who is thereby exhorted
# to converse with his four-footed companion as a reward for its
# having gone walkies. If the owner has succeeded in making his
# dog go walkies, he is home free, and is faced with nothing beyond
# the mild embarrassment of being obliged to whisper sweet nothings
# in its hairy ear. But if the dog has declined to go walkies, the
# owner is in the cart. 'Your trouble is you're *looking* at her!
# Do you see? I want you to move a bit more naturally. Go on, move!
# *Move!* Run! WALKIES!'
--
Mark Brader, Toronto "A cow-orker of mine used to ood dogs."
***@vex.net -- Steve Hayes

My text in this article is in the public domain.
CDB
2018-06-11 09:09:35 UTC
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[Barabara Woodhouse]
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Tony Cooper
People who say "walkies" are the type who tend to kiss their
dog on the mouth...err...muzzle. Yech!
Maybe some of them.
"walkies" is a "command" to a dog, as is "sit".
It may be, but it's never been used in that way in my hearing.
And, I've heard the word used quite a bit over the years.
What does "walkies" command a dog to do? If it is a command to
get very excited and prance about in joyous anticipation of new
smells to sniff, then just picking up the leash in our dog's sight
is a visual "walkies" command. --
Well quite. It's like saying that "ice cream" is a command to
children.
No, it's saying "treat?" to a dog that is like "ice cream?" to a child.

Going for a walk is a group activity led by the dominant member of the
group. As dogs see it, it is the vital act of patrolling territory.
"Walkies" is a perfectly good command for that.
--
Or "caviar?" to a general.
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-06-11 11:01:38 UTC
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Post by CDB
[Barabara Woodhouse]
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Tony Cooper
People who say "walkies" are the type who tend to kiss their
dog on the mouth...err...muzzle. Yech!
Maybe some of them.
"walkies" is a "command" to a dog, as is "sit".
It may be, but it's never been used in that way in my hearing.
And, I've heard the word used quite a bit over the years.
What does "walkies" command a dog to do? If it is a command to
get very excited and prance about in joyous anticipation of new
smells to sniff, then just picking up the leash in our dog's sight
is a visual "walkies" command. --
Well quite. It's like saying that "ice cream" is a command to children.
No, it's saying "treat?" to a dog that is like "ice cream?" to a child.
Going for a walk is a group activity led by the dominant member of the
group. As dogs see it, it is the vital act of patrolling territory.
"Walkies" is a perfectly good command for that.
--
The point is that there is no command needed at least for any dog
that I know. If a command is necessary it is to stop one's four
footed friend assuming that every time you get out of a chair you're
immediately heading for the door. Walkies is a treat. It's the best
and biggest treat of the day.
RH Draney
2018-06-11 12:46:46 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
The point is that there is no command needed at least for any dog
that I know. If a command is necessary it is to stop one's four
footed friend assuming that every time you get out of a chair you're
immediately heading for the door. Walkies is a treat. It's the best
and biggest treat of the day.
While for a cat, the best and biggest treat of the day is having a nice
lie down....r
Tony Cooper
2018-06-11 13:14:31 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
The point is that there is no command needed at least for any dog
that I know. If a command is necessary it is to stop one's four
footed friend assuming that every time you get out of a chair you're
immediately heading for the door. Walkies is a treat. It's the best
and biggest treat of the day.
While for a cat, the best and biggest treat of the day is having a nice
lie down....r
Cats are easy to train. When we had a cat I trained it to "Stay",
"Sleep", "Yawn", "Stretch", and "Ignore" on command.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mack A. Damia
2018-06-11 15:46:37 UTC
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Post by RH Draney
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
The point is that there is no command needed at least for any dog
that I know. If a command is necessary it is to stop one's four
footed friend assuming that every time you get out of a chair you're
immediately heading for the door. Walkies is a treat. It's the best
and biggest treat of the day.
While for a cat, the best and biggest treat of the day is having a nice
lie down....r
I know. I know.

On my chest as I sit here.
CDB
2018-06-11 13:11:23 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by CDB
[Barabara Woodhouse]
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Tony Cooper
People who say "walkies" are the type who tend to kiss
their dog on the mouth...err...muzzle. Yech!
Maybe some of them.
"walkies" is a "command" to a dog, as is "sit".
It may be, but it's never been used in that way in my hearing.
And, I've heard the word used quite a bit over the years.
What does "walkies" command a dog to do? If it is a command
to get very excited and prance about in joyous anticipation of
new smells to sniff, then just picking up the leash in our
dog's sight is a visual "walkies" command. --
Well quite. It's like saying that "ice cream" is a command to children.
No, it's saying "treat?" to a dog that is like "ice cream?" to a child.
Going for a walk is a group activity led by the dominant member of
the group. As dogs see it, it is the vital act of patrolling
territory. "Walkies" is a perfectly good command for that.
--
The point is that there is no command needed at least for any dog
that I know. If a command is necessary it is to stop one's four
footed friend assuming that every time you get out of a chair you're
immediately heading for the door. Walkies is a treat. It's the best
and biggest treat of the day.
The reaction may depend on what they're used to. My dogs got at least a
couple of hours a day patrolling, usually on schedule, and the only
days I didn't walk them were during ice-storms (it was all off if I
fell more than three times between house and woods) and one week I spent
in hospital (when I arranged for substitute). They were cheerful and
ready, but not to the point of losing their dignity.
Jerry Friedman
2018-06-11 22:29:42 UTC
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On 6/11/18 5:01 AM, Madrigal Gurneyhalt wrote:

[walkies]
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
The point is that there is no command needed at least for any dog
that I know. If a command is necessary it is to stop one's four
footed friend assuming that every time you get out of a chair you're
immediately heading for the door. Walkies is a treat. It's the best
and biggest treat of the day.
For the dog we had when I was a teenager, I couldn't have distinguished
any difference in treat level between going for a walk, going for a ride
in the car, eating, and barking at people at the door.
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter Moylan
2018-06-12 00:12:57 UTC
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Post by Hen Hanna
[walkies]
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
The point is that there is no command needed at least for any dog
that I know. If a command is necessary it is to stop one's four
footed friend assuming that every time you get out of a chair
you're immediately heading for the door. Walkies is a treat. It's
the best and biggest treat of the day.
For the dog we had when I was a teenager, I couldn't have
distinguished any difference in treat level between going for a walk,
going for a ride in the car, eating, and barking at people at the
door.
One dog we had was hypersensitive to the jingle of car keys. As soon as
my father picked up his keys, the dog took a running jump through the
car window, and sat waiting on the passenger seat.

Luckily for the dog, my father rarely closed the window.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
CDB
2018-06-11 09:09:14 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage,
Yes, but used by all classes.
Post by Don P
popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Woodhouse
" Her 1980 television series Training Dogs the Woodhouse Way made her a
household name in the UK. Among her catch-phrases were "walkies" and
"sit!"
I'm sure she's a good dog trainer, and a good person in general, but
it's a bit sad that she's remembered as the person who popularized
"walkies".
She's the person who popularised dog training.
Post by Tony Cooper
People who say "walkies" are the type who tend to kiss their dog on
the mouth...err...muzzle. Yech!
Maybe some of them.
"walkies" is a "command" to a dog, as is "sit".
It may be, but it's never been used in that way in my hearing. And,
I've heard the word used quite a bit over the years.
What does "walkies" command a dog to do? If it is a command to get
very excited and prance about in joyous anticipation of new smells to
sniff, then just picking up the leash in our dog's sight is a visual
"walkies" command.
I think dogs usually intepret communication as command, maybe because
that's how they use it. I used to tell my dogs "I'll be right back"
(always with the same gesture and intonation-pattern, as with anything I
intended them to understand) in the expectation that they would
eventually realise that I then came back quickly, but I never saw any
evidence that they distinguished it from "Stay".
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-06-10 11:14:30 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage,
Yes, but used by all classes.
Post by Don P
popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Woodhouse
" Her 1980 television series Training Dogs the Woodhouse Way made her a
household name in the UK. Among her catch-phrases were "walkies" and
"sit!"
I'm sure she's a good dog trainer, and a good person in general, but
it's a bit sad that she's remembered as the person who popularized
"walkies".
People who say "walkies" are the type who tend to kiss their dog on
the mouth...err...muzzle. Yech!
--
Yech? I must remind you that a dog's mouth contains far less bacteria
and far fewer varieties of it than the mouth of a human being. Kissing
a human on the mouth is far more unsanitary and disgusting than
kissing a dog. If you're prepared to do the former you really should
not have a problem with the latter!
Richard Tobin
2018-06-10 12:25:14 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Yech? I must remind you that a dog's mouth contains far less bacteria
and far fewer varieties of it than the mouth of a human being.
Citation needed.
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Kissing
a human on the mouth is far more unsanitary and disgusting than
kissing a dog.
Citation needed.

-- Richard
Janet
2018-06-11 16:01:07 UTC
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Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
I must remind you that a dog's mouth contains far less bacteria
and far fewer varieties of it than the mouth of a human being.
https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/dog-and-human-mouths/

Janet
Madrigal Gurneyhalt
2018-06-11 16:16:17 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
I must remind you that a dog's mouth contains far less bacteria
and far fewer varieties of it than the mouth of a human being.
https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/dog-and-human-mouths/
Really? You're going to spoil a perfectly decent argument with facts.
I hope you're ashamed of yourself! Bed with no tea, young lady!
CDB
2018-06-11 21:05:30 UTC
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Post by Janet
I must remind you that a dog's mouth contains far less bacteria and
far fewer varieties of it than the mouth of a human being.
https://www.snopes.com/fact-check/dog-and-human-mouths/
It may vary with the individual. One of my dogs, Shadow, was very
persistent in trying to lick any cut or scrape I had. I resisted (I
have never kissed dogs either*), but eventually he made it through my
defences and I found that the cuts he licked healed cleanly, without
even a hint of inflammation. I stopped struggling, and things continued
to go well.
______________________________________________________
*OK, maybe a few times on the top of the head, when the occasion seemed
to call for a gesture.
Tony Cooper
2018-06-10 13:44:39 UTC
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On Sun, 10 Jun 2018 04:14:30 -0700 (PDT), Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Madrigal Gurneyhalt
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Janet
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage,
Yes, but used by all classes.
Post by Don P
popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Woodhouse
" Her 1980 television series Training Dogs the Woodhouse Way made her a
household name in the UK. Among her catch-phrases were "walkies" and
"sit!"
I'm sure she's a good dog trainer, and a good person in general, but
it's a bit sad that she's remembered as the person who popularized
"walkies".
People who say "walkies" are the type who tend to kiss their dog on
the mouth...err...muzzle. Yech!
--
Yech? I must remind you that a dog's mouth contains far less bacteria
and far fewer varieties of it than the mouth of a human being. Kissing
a human on the mouth is far more unsanitary and disgusting than
kissing a dog. If you're prepared to do the former you really should
not have a problem with the latter!
It's been a long time since I made any decisions about which mouth to
kiss, but those decisions were never made based on the bacteria count.
"Two legs, yes, four legs, no" and "What's between the legs?" would
have been the first steps in the decision process.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
J. J. Lodder
2018-06-10 09:45:16 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
"Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies] more common in the UK ? HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage,
Yes, but used by all classes.
Post by Don P
popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Barbara_Woodhouse
" Her 1980 television series Training Dogs the Woodhouse Way made her a
household name in the UK. Among her catch-phrases were "walkies" and
"sit!"
I have seen an amusing childrens book that makes fun of it.
A misbehaving dog, who interprets all orders in the wrong way
is sent to dog school.
The result is of course that chaos ensues
because all other dogs at the school take over his habits.
(like shredding a newspaper when ordered 'apport')
So he is sent away.

All ends well when the dog catches a burglar
by obeying all the wrong orders.
Alas, forgotten both author and title,

Jan
LFS
2018-06-10 07:08:38 UTC
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Post by Don P
Post by Hen Hanna
https://en.wiktionary.org/wiki/walkies
           "Rover, time for walkies!"
is the term [walkies]  more common in the UK ?    HH
Yes, but it is a strictly middle and upper class usage, popularized by
the TV appearances of a lady dog trainer (of forgotten name) in the
1960s, and recurring in films etc.
Those of us who watch Coronation Street where dogs feature regularly
will know that the usage has nothing to do with class.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
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