Discussion:
snapshot
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Martin Str|mberg
2017-04-15 06:28:28 UTC
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"a snapshot".

I want the verb. Is it "to snapshot; yesterday snapshotted"?

OTOH, shot seems to be past of shoot. So is it "to snapshoot;
yesterday snapshot"?

OT{third}H, Oxford learner's dictionaries on the web tells me snap is
a verb. So is it "to snapshot; yesterday snappedshot"? (Hrmmm!)
--
MartinS
q***@yahoo.com
2017-04-15 07:07:04 UTC
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On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 06:28:28 +0000 (UTC), Martin Str|mberg
Post by Martin Str|mberg
"a snapshot".
I want the verb. Is it "to snapshot; yesterday snapshotted"?
OTOH, shot seems to be past of shoot. So is it "to snapshoot;
yesterday snapshot"?
OT{third}H, Oxford learner's dictionaries on the web tells me snap is
a verb. So is it "to snapshot; yesterday snappedshot"? (Hrmmm!)
Per Merriam-Webster, the verb is 'snapshoot', and it is a
back-formation from the noun 'snapshot'.
The past tense is 'snapshot'.
In those words, 'snap' implies a photo captured quickly, not posed.
I don't think 'snapshoot' is very common.

'Snap' as a verb also can mean to take a picture. 'Snap' as a noun can
mean a 'snapshot'.
--
John
Mark Brader
2017-04-15 09:11:02 UTC
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Post by Martin Str|mberg
"a snapshot".
I want the verb. Is it "to snapshot; yesterday snapshotted"?
OTOH, shot seems to be past of shoot. So is it "to snapshoot;
yesterday snapshot"?
Per Merriam-Webster, the verb is 'snapshoot', and it is a
back-formation from the noun 'snapshot'.
The past tense is 'snapshot'.
In those words, 'snap' implies a photo captured quickly, not posed.
I don't think 'snapshoot' is very common.
It may be in M-W, but I don't think I've ever heard it. As far as
I'm concerned you have a choice of two verbs here, "snap" and "shoot",
with their usual past tenses, "snapped" and "shot". I would normally
use "shoot" myself; this works with all types of photo, and I don't
see a need to use a separate verb for snapshots.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "Courtesy, hell. We're programmers not humans."
***@vex.net | -- S. M. Ryan

My text in this article is in the public domain.
bill van
2017-04-15 18:42:56 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by q***@yahoo.com
Post by Martin Str|mberg
"a snapshot".
I want the verb. Is it "to snapshot; yesterday snapshotted"?
OTOH, shot seems to be past of shoot. So is it "to snapshoot;
yesterday snapshot"?
Per Merriam-Webster, the verb is 'snapshoot', and it is a
back-formation from the noun 'snapshot'.
The past tense is 'snapshot'.
In those words, 'snap' implies a photo captured quickly, not posed.
I don't think 'snapshoot' is very common.
It may be in M-W, but I don't think I've ever heard it. As far as
I'm concerned you have a choice of two verbs here, "snap" and "shoot",
with their usual past tenses, "snapped" and "shot". I would normally
use "shoot" myself; this works with all types of photo, and I don't
see a need to use a separate verb for snapshots.
My spouse of 43 years is a photographer. She usually shoots, and snaps
only when she's with family or friends. Even then, she composes the shot
more thoroughly than you'd expect from a snapshot. Come to think of it,
when she doesn't take time to compose, it's more of a "grab shot" than a
snapshot. The latter definitely suggests non-professional photography to
me.
--
bill
John Varela
2017-04-16 19:30:09 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by q***@yahoo.com
Post by Martin Str|mberg
"a snapshot".
I want the verb. Is it "to snapshot; yesterday snapshotted"?
OTOH, shot seems to be past of shoot. So is it "to snapshoot;
yesterday snapshot"?
Per Merriam-Webster, the verb is 'snapshoot', and it is a
back-formation from the noun 'snapshot'.
The past tense is 'snapshot'.
In those words, 'snap' implies a photo captured quickly, not posed.
I don't think 'snapshoot' is very common.
It may be in M-W, but I don't think I've ever heard it. As far as
I'm concerned you have a choice of two verbs here, "snap" and "shoot",
with their usual past tenses, "snapped" and "shot". I would normally
use "shoot" myself; this works with all types of photo, and I don't
see a need to use a separate verb for snapshots.
I snap off a quick shot, but shoot a posed photo.
--
John Varela
Tony Cooper
2017-04-16 19:44:55 UTC
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Post by John Varela
Post by Mark Brader
Post by q***@yahoo.com
Post by Martin Str|mberg
"a snapshot".
I want the verb. Is it "to snapshot; yesterday snapshotted"?
OTOH, shot seems to be past of shoot. So is it "to snapshoot;
yesterday snapshot"?
Per Merriam-Webster, the verb is 'snapshoot', and it is a
back-formation from the noun 'snapshot'.
The past tense is 'snapshot'.
In those words, 'snap' implies a photo captured quickly, not posed.
I don't think 'snapshoot' is very common.
It may be in M-W, but I don't think I've ever heard it. As far as
I'm concerned you have a choice of two verbs here, "snap" and "shoot",
with their usual past tenses, "snapped" and "shot". I would normally
use "shoot" myself; this works with all types of photo, and I don't
see a need to use a separate verb for snapshots.
I snap off a quick shot, but shoot a posed photo.
I look at it a little differently because I do so much photography. To
me, a "snapshot" is a photo that quickly taken without any regard for
background or composition.

When I shoot a baseball game, most shots are quickly taken but they
are not snapshots because I do give consideration to background and
composition. While I follow the action, I have pre-planned where to
be when I take a series of shots.

That's the perspective, though, of someone who does a lot of
photography, but not necessarily one of general understanding.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Paul Carmichael
2017-04-15 10:33:43 UTC
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Post by Martin Str|mberg
"a snapshot".
I want the verb. Is it "to snapshot; yesterday snapshotted"?
OTOH, shot seems to be past of shoot. So is it "to snapshoot;
yesterday snapshot"?
OT{third}H, Oxford learner's dictionaries on the web tells me snap is
a verb. So is it "to snapshot; yesterday snappedshot"? (Hrmmm!)
It's normal to hear "take a snapshot". Or just snap.

"I went out snapping yesterday and amongst the snapshots I took was this one of a tree."
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/
https://asetrad.org
Peter T. Daniels
2017-04-15 12:37:17 UTC
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Post by Martin Str|mberg
"a snapshot".
I want the verb. Is it "to snapshot; yesterday snapshotted"?
OTOH, shot seems to be past of shoot. So is it "to snapshoot;
yesterday snapshot"?
OT{third}H, Oxford learner's dictionaries on the web tells me snap is
a verb. So is it "to snapshot; yesterday snappedshot"? (Hrmmm!)
Asked and answered in sci.lang days ago. Now apparently asked in a scattershot crossposting
(guessing from the responders).
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-04-15 14:55:04 UTC
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On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 06:28:28 +0000 (UTC), Martin Str|mberg
Post by Martin Str|mberg
"a snapshot".
I want the verb. Is it "to snapshot; yesterday snapshotted"?
OTOH, shot seems to be past of shoot. So is it "to snapshoot;
yesterday snapshot"?
OT{third}H, Oxford learner's dictionaries on the web tells me snap is
a verb. So is it "to snapshot; yesterday snappedshot"? (Hrmmm!)
The full Oxford English dictionary says:

snap-, comb. form

The stem of snap v. in combination.

1.e. Formed, taken, performed, etc., hastily or rapidly, as snap
exposure, snap-firing, snap judgement, etc. Also snap freezing n.
freezing done by reducing the temperature suddenly to well below
freezing point. snap-freeze v. trans.
In this and the next group passing into adjective.

Note that last sentence. In the following "snap" is in effect an
adjective. These are just a few of the examples:

1841 Congress. Globe X. App. 42/3 This extra session of
Congress, called in time of peace to take snap judgments on the
American people.
1861 N. York Tribune in Times 19 Nov. A traveller's
snap-judgement formed on the most superficial observation.
....
1889 Internat. Ann. Anthonys Photogr. Bull. 255 For snap
exposures a different course is necessary.
1894 Amer. Ann. Photogr. 137 The real necessities for snap
photography.
....
1932 ‘N. Shute’ Lonely Road xi. 229 This isn't any snap decision
on my part. I've been thinking of it for some time.
1933 Mod. Lang. Notes 48 393 In most cases they reflect, not
conclusions drawn from research, but snap judgments based on
chance observation and personal likes and dislikes.
....
1976 Alyn & Deeside Observer 10 Dec. 16/3 The information
arrives at a time which can allow only for a ‘snap decision’.
1977 Times of Zambia 7 Sept. 2/2 A snap survey of clinics found
that medical assistants in the health institutions had not been
able to administer prescribed drugs for some time now.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Peter Moylan
2017-04-16 01:13:29 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Note that last sentence. In the following "snap" is in effect an
1841 Congress. Globe X. App. 42/3 This extra session of
Congress, called in time of peace to take snap judgments on the
American people.
1861 N. York Tribune in Times 19 Nov. A traveller's
snap-judgement formed on the most superficial observation.
....
1889 Internat. Ann. Anthonys Photogr. Bull. 255 For snap
exposures a different course is necessary.
1894 Amer. Ann. Photogr. 137 The real necessities for snap
photography.
....
1932 ‘N. Shute’ Lonely Road xi. 229 This isn't any snap decision
on my part. I've been thinking of it for some time.
[...]

Does OED always put quotation marks around an author's name?
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Mark Brader
2017-04-16 01:38:31 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
1932 'N. Shute' Lonely Road xi. 229 This isn't any snap decision
on my part. I've been thinking of it for some time.
Does OED always put quotation marks around an author's name?
The author's name was Norway. "Nevil Shute" was a pseudonym
(consisting in this case of his first and middle names).

I'm having technical difficulties accessing the OED Online just
now, so I can't check whether they always put pseudonyms in
quotation marks, but I would guess that's the idea.
--
Mark Brader "Well, I didn't completely test it, and
Toronto of course there was a power failure the
***@vex.net next day." -- Louis J. Judice

My text in this article is in the public domain.
James Hogg
2017-04-16 10:11:01 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Peter Moylan
1932 'N. Shute' Lonely Road xi. 229 This isn't any snap decision
on my part. I've been thinking of it for some time.
Does OED always put quotation marks around an author's name?
The author's name was Norway. "Nevil Shute" was a pseudonym
(consisting in this case of his first and middle names).
I'm having technical difficulties accessing the OED Online just
now, so I can't check whether they always put pseudonyms in
quotation marks, but I would guess that's the idea.
I looked up "newspeak" and, yes, there are quotations from 'G. Orwell'.
--
James
Richard Tobin
2017-04-16 15:07:08 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
The author's name was Norway. "Nevil Shute" was a pseudonym
(consisting in this case of his first and middle names).
I'm having technical difficulties accessing the OED Online just
now, so I can't check whether they always put pseudonyms in
quotation marks, but I would guess that's the idea.
Often, at least.

If you click on the citation link, it says:

Nevil Shute - Lonely road - 1932.
London: Cassell and Co

'Nevil Shute' (1899-1960) (real name Nevil Shute Norway)
Novelist and aeronautical engineer

-- Richard
Tony Cooper
2017-04-15 15:49:04 UTC
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On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 06:28:28 +0000 (UTC), Martin Str|mberg
Post by Martin Str|mberg
"a snapshot".
I want the verb. Is it "to snapshot; yesterday snapshotted"?
OTOH, shot seems to be past of shoot. So is it "to snapshoot;
yesterday snapshot"?
OT{third}H, Oxford learner's dictionaries on the web tells me snap is
a verb. So is it "to snapshot; yesterday snappedshot"? (Hrmmm!)
I cannot imagine how a verb form of "snapshot" would be used.

There are several uses of the word, and it is not limited to the
description of a type of photograph. A short and general written
description of a condition can a "snapshot", but the writer would be
asked to "provide a snapshot of rental trends in...". He would not
be asked to do a "snapshoot".

In your last sentence, the writer would provide "a snapshot of
yesterday's conditions".

The snapshot is a noun or adjective in all cases. The verb would be
how it was, or will be, obtained: "take", "write", "provide", etc.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Jerry Friedman
2017-04-15 15:59:59 UTC
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Post by q***@yahoo.com
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 06:28:28 +0000 (UTC), Martin Str|mberg
Post by Martin Str|mberg
"a snapshot".
I want the verb. Is it "to snapshot; yesterday snapshotted"?
OTOH, shot seems to be past of shoot. So is it "to snapshoot;
yesterday snapshot"?
OT{third}H, Oxford learner's dictionaries on the web tells me snap is
a verb. So is it "to snapshot; yesterday snappedshot"? (Hrmmm!)
I cannot imagine how a verb form of "snapshot" would be used.
...

As people have said, "snap" is used for that. "I snapped a picture, and
it came out surprisingly well."
--
Jerry Friedman
Tony Cooper
2017-04-15 22:14:51 UTC
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On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 09:59:59 -0600, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by q***@yahoo.com
On Sat, 15 Apr 2017 06:28:28 +0000 (UTC), Martin Str|mberg
Post by Martin Str|mberg
"a snapshot".
I want the verb. Is it "to snapshot; yesterday snapshotted"?
OTOH, shot seems to be past of shoot. So is it "to snapshoot;
yesterday snapshot"?
OT{third}H, Oxford learner's dictionaries on the web tells me snap is
a verb. So is it "to snapshot; yesterday snappedshot"? (Hrmmm!)
I cannot imagine how a verb form of "snapshot" would be used.
...
As people have said, "snap" is used for that. "I snapped a picture, and
it came out surprisingly well."
"Snap", to me, is not the verb form of "snapshot". A "snap" is the
same thing as a snapshot; it's just a shortened version of the word.
Either of these two sentences would have the same meaning;

He showed me a snap of Aunt Polly.
He showed me a snapshot of Aunt Polly.

You can use "snap" as a verb - "Snap the picture now" - but it is not
the verb form of "snapshot". In your example, the word "picture" is
used in place of "snapshot", but a better word choice.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Mark Brader
2017-04-15 22:26:33 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
I cannot imagine how a verb form of "snapshot" would be used.
I can imagine using such a verb metaphorically. In contexts such as
computer backups, a "snapshot" means a complete copy of the relevant
system as it existed at a certain time, or the information necessary
to create one. In such a context I could see myself saying that the
system was "snapshotted" last night at 10 pm. (Because this is a
conversion of the noun "snapshot" to a verb, the present tense has
to be "snapshot", hence the regular inflection.)

I said I can imagine it being used that way, but I don't think I ever
*have* used it or encountered such a use.
--
Mark Brader | ...roll the imaginary 60-meter sphere across the landscape
Toronto | (for safety reasons, do not use a real sphere).
***@vex.net | --Randall Munroe

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Tony Cooper
2017-04-15 22:40:05 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
I cannot imagine how a verb form of "snapshot" would be used.
I can imagine using such a verb metaphorically. In contexts such as
computer backups, a "snapshot" means a complete copy of the relevant
system as it existed at a certain time, or the information necessary
to create one. In such a context I could see myself saying that the
system was "snapshotted" last night at 10 pm. (Because this is a
conversion of the noun "snapshot" to a verb, the present tense has
to be "snapshot", hence the regular inflection.)
I said I can imagine it being used that way, but I don't think I ever
*have* used it or encountered such a use.
There are other uses of "snapshot". I use Adobe Photoshop quite a
bit, and there is a feature in Photoshop where I can make a snapshot
of a layer and what I have done so far. If I make additional edits,
and want to revert back to a previous state, I can click the snapshot
layer and go back to that state.

But, I would not say I "snapshot" or "snapshotted" the layer. My
description would be the same as other uses: "I took a snapshot of
the layer". Not even metaphorically.

It seems to me that the objective in answering the OP's question is to
provide an answer that the OP can use without confusing his
reader/listener. In that case, the answer is "There is no verb form
of 'snapshot'."
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Garrett Wollman
2017-04-16 02:05:13 UTC
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[apols for the non-snippage here but context necessary]
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
I cannot imagine how a verb form of "snapshot" would be used.
I can imagine using such a verb metaphorically. In contexts such as
computer backups, a "snapshot" means a complete copy of the relevant
system as it existed at a certain time, or the information necessary
to create one. In such a context I could see myself saying that the
system was "snapshotted" last night at 10 pm. (Because this is a
conversion of the noun "snapshot" to a verb, the present tense has
to be "snapshot", hence the regular inflection.)
I said I can imagine it being used that way, but I don't think I ever
*have* used it or encountered such a use.
I have used and do use exactly this. I'd call it jargon though, not
necessarily Standard English (yet).

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
Tony Cooper
2017-04-16 03:51:35 UTC
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Post by Garrett Wollman
[apols for the non-snippage here but context necessary]
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
I cannot imagine how a verb form of "snapshot" would be used.
I can imagine using such a verb metaphorically. In contexts such as
computer backups, a "snapshot" means a complete copy of the relevant
system as it existed at a certain time, or the information necessary
to create one. In such a context I could see myself saying that the
system was "snapshotted" last night at 10 pm. (Because this is a
conversion of the noun "snapshot" to a verb, the present tense has
to be "snapshot", hence the regular inflection.)
I said I can imagine it being used that way, but I don't think I ever
*have* used it or encountered such a use.
I have used and do use exactly this. I'd call it jargon though, not
necessarily Standard English (yet).
It finally dawned on me that this "snapshot" y'all are referring to is
another term for a "disk image", and this is the term that is used by
the software that I use.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Snidely
2017-04-22 08:42:38 UTC
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Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Garrett Wollman
[apols for the non-snippage here but context necessary]
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
I cannot imagine how a verb form of "snapshot" would be used.
I can imagine using such a verb metaphorically. In contexts such as
computer backups, a "snapshot" means a complete copy of the relevant
system as it existed at a certain time, or the information necessary
to create one. In such a context I could see myself saying that the
system was "snapshotted" last night at 10 pm. (Because this is a
conversion of the noun "snapshot" to a verb, the present tense has
to be "snapshot", hence the regular inflection.)
I said I can imagine it being used that way, but I don't think I ever
*have* used it or encountered such a use.
I have used and do use exactly this. I'd call it jargon though, not
necessarily Standard English (yet).
It finally dawned on me that this "snapshot" y'all are referring to is
another term for a "disk image", and this is the term that is used by
the software that I use.
"Disk Image" is an example of a snapshot used for backup (making a copy
for recovery after a failure) or for backing up (that is, undoing an
action), but not all snapshots for backup/backing-up are disk images.
A simple file copy covers many cases, and a few times you'll find
something that's just kept in memory (mainly for small stuff).

VMWare has a menu item for creating a snapshot of one of the "guest"
systems, and that's pretty much a disk image, but filesystems
themselves can have snapshots, which tend to be fragments of disk
images.

/dps
--
Who, me? And what lacuna?
Richard Tobin
2017-04-22 15:50:25 UTC
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Post by Snidely
"Disk Image" is an example of a snapshot used for backup (making a copy
for recovery after a failure) or for backing up (that is, undoing an
action), but not all snapshots for backup/backing-up are disk images.
And not all disk images are snapshots. Some are just a convenient way
of distributing software. The software may not have existed in that
particular arrangement until the the disk image was made, so it would
not be reasonable to call them snapshots.

-- Richard
Garrett Wollman
2017-04-22 21:01:05 UTC
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Post by Snidely
Post by Tony Cooper
It finally dawned on me that this "snapshot" y'all are referring to is
another term for a "disk image", and this is the term that is used by
the software that I use.
"Disk Image" is an example of a snapshot used for backup (making a copy
for recovery after a failure) or for backing up (that is, undoing an
action), but not all snapshots for backup/backing-up are disk images.
A snapshot is specifically an *atomic* view of the contents of a
filesystem -- and in practice usually also implies copy-on-write for
efficiency. In a filesystem that is designed to be non-overwriting
from the start (like WAFL or ZFS) these are trivial; much more work is
required in an overwriting filesystem (UFS, Ext[234], NTFS, etc.).

Some applications (such as databases) require additional work to
ensure that the on-disk state is consistent before taking a snapshot;
other applications (like mail transfer agents) are designed to ensure
that the on-disk state is always consistent.
Post by Snidely
VMWare has a menu item for creating a snapshot of one of the "guest"
systems, and that's pretty much a disk image, but filesystems
themselves can have snapshots, which tend to be fragments of disk
images.
Because VMware virtualizes the "disk" seen by the guest virtual
machine, it can easily interpose a block-remapping layer that allows
for copy-on-write semantics. The same mechanism is used for "thin
provisioning". In order for this to be a proper atomic snapshot, the
guest VM must be suspended or completely shut down (depending on the
guest's filesystem implementation) before taking the clone; otherwise
it's possible to get a "snapshot" of an inconsistent state.

-GAWollman
--
Garrett A. Wollman | "Act to avoid constraining the future; if you can,
***@bimajority.org| act to remove constraint from the future. This is
Opinions not shared by| a thing you can do, are able to do, to do together."
my employers. | - Graydon Saunders, _A Succession of Bad Days_ (2015)
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