Discussion:
Appellations
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David Kleinecke
2017-10-09 16:55:22 UTC
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From the latest news:
The counties of California’s Emerald Triangle —
Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
producing some of the world’s best cannabis,
but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide California’s cannabis country
into distinctive growing areas called
appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation

It is hard to guess how this will play out.
Mack A. Damia
2017-10-09 17:31:42 UTC
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On Mon, 9 Oct 2017 09:55:22 -0700 (PDT), David Kleinecke
The counties of California’s Emerald Triangle —
Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
producing some of the world’s best cannabis,
but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide California’s cannabis country
into distinctive growing areas called
appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation
It is hard to guess how this will play out.
You may have heard that Trump mentioned the "calm before the storm".

He got loads of questions to which he would not respond except to say,
"You wait". Lots of speculation as to what he meant.

I have a hunch that it could mean raids on marijuana operations -
certainly in Colorado and Washington. Any other state have
recreational marijuana? California's doesn't go into effect until
January 1.

He may not touch medical marijuana operations, but who knows?

I could be wrong, of course.
Horace LaBadie
2017-10-09 17:58:25 UTC
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The counties of California’s Emerald Triangle —
Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
producing some of the world’s best cannabis,
but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide California’s cannabis country
into distinctive growing areas called
appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation
It is hard to guess how this will play out.
It is a French term for wine-growing regions. There is a government body
that regulates which wines can be called Burgundies or Champagnes.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-10-09 19:21:05 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by David Kleinecke
The counties of California’s Emerald Triangle —
Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
producing some of the world’s best cannabis,
but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide California’s cannabis country
into distinctive growing areas called
appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation
It is hard to guess how this will play out.
It is a French term for wine-growing regions. There is a government body
that regulates which wines can be called Burgundies or Champagnes.
In this context "appellation" is short for "appellation contrôlée":
https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/appellation_controlee

NOUN

A description awarded to French wine guaranteeing that it was
produced in the region specified, using vines and production methods
which satisfy the regulating body.

Origin
French, literally ‘controlled appellation’

In English, "appellation" is a formal word for "name" or "title".
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Horace LaBadie
2017-10-09 19:28:29 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
In English, "appellation" is a formal word for "name" or "title".
Is this your Twitter account?

<https://mobile.twitter.com/CaptainObvious?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcam
p%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor>
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-10-09 22:30:01 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
In English, "appellation" is a formal word for "name" or "title".
Is this your Twitter account?
<https://mobile.twitter.com/CaptainObvious?ref_src=twsrc%5Egoogle%7Ctwcam
p%5Eserp%7Ctwgr%5Eauthor>
No. That's not me. <smile>
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Whiskers
2017-10-09 19:43:42 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by David Kleinecke
The counties of California’s Emerald Triangle —
Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
producing some of the world’s best cannabis,
but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide California’s cannabis country
into distinctive growing areas called
appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation
It is hard to guess how this will play out.
It is a French term for wine-growing regions. There is a government body
that regulates which wines can be called Burgundies or Champagnes.
As in 'appellation contrôlée' and 'appellation d'origine contrôlée'.
The BrE equivalents are 'protected geographical indication' & 'protected
designation of origin'. Applied to all sorts of food and drink, not
only wine. Californian cannabis growers are apparently aiming for
similar protected status.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-09 21:27:37 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by David Kleinecke
The counties of California’s Emerald Triangle —
Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
producing some of the world’s best cannabis,
but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide California’s cannabis country
into distinctive growing areas called
appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation
It is hard to guess how this will play out.
It is a French term for wine-growing regions. There is a government body
that regulates which wines can be called Burgundies or Champagnes.
As in 'appellation contrôlée' and 'appellation d'origine contrôlée'.
The BrE equivalents are 'protected geographical indication' & 'protected
designation of origin'. Applied to all sorts of food and drink, not
only wine. Californian cannabis growers are apparently aiming for
similar protected status.
Maybe because registering trademarks is a Federal thing, and the Feds can't
legitimate marijuana-growing?
Horace LaBadie
2017-10-09 21:48:26 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
The counties of California’s Emerald Triangle —
Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
producing some of the world’s best cannabis,
but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide California’s cannabis country
into distinctive growing areas called
appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation
It is hard to guess how this will play out.
It is a French term for wine-growing regions. There is a government body
that regulates which wines can be called Burgundies or Champagnes.
As in 'appellation contrÎlée' and 'appellation d'origine contrÎlée'.
The BrE equivalents are 'protected geographical indication' & 'protected
designation of origin'. Applied to all sorts of food and drink, not
only wine. Californian cannabis growers are apparently aiming for
similar protected status.
Maybe because registering trademarks is a Federal thing, and the Feds can't
legitimate marijuana-growing?
Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. v Clark, 1871. The Supreme Court ruled that
geographical names designating the good's place of production (as
opposed to the good's producer) cannot be trademarked.

It could be that the appellation scheme would not fly under Federal
trademark law.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-09 22:14:08 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Whiskers
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by David Kleinecke
The counties of California’s Emerald Triangle —
Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
producing some of the world’s best cannabis,
but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide California’s cannabis country
into distinctive growing areas called
appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation
It is hard to guess how this will play out.
It is a French term for wine-growing regions. There is a government body
that regulates which wines can be called Burgundies or Champagnes.
As in 'appellation contrôlée' and 'appellation d'origine contrôlée'.
The BrE equivalents are 'protected geographical indication' & 'protected
designation of origin'. Applied to all sorts of food and drink, not
only wine. Californian cannabis growers are apparently aiming for
similar protected status.
Maybe because registering trademarks is a Federal thing, and the Feds can't
legitimate marijuana-growing?
Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. v Clark, 1871. The Supreme Court ruled that
geographical names designating the good's place of production (as
opposed to the good's producer) cannot be trademarked.
It could be that the appellation scheme would not fly under Federal
trademark law.
Nonetheless, Federal trademark law can't be used to trademark a name for an
illegal (Federally) substance, can it?

You mean, a Long Island potato farm could claim they were selling Idaho potatoes?

This afternoon, at my aunt's 100th-birthday party, I learned that my first
cousin once removed is a pretty serious home brewer, and he says NYS law says
he wouldn't be able to market his stuff, or open a brewpub, without meeting a
myriad of requirements -- one of which is using only NYS-grown hops (whereas
everyone knows the best hops come from Washington, and there used to be some
sort of legal monopoly protecting their crop).
Paul Wolff
2017-10-09 23:00:16 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Whiskers
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by David Kleinecke
The counties of California’s Emerald Triangle —
Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
producing some of the world’s best cannabis,
but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide California’s cannabis country
into distinctive growing areas called
appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation
It is hard to guess how this will play out.
It is a French term for wine-growing regions. There is a government body
that regulates which wines can be called Burgundies or Champagnes.
As in 'appellation contrôlée' and 'appellation d'origine contrôlée'.
The BrE equivalents are 'protected geographical indication' & 'protected
designation of origin'.
For the avoidance of doubt: that's British-English in the sense of being
European Union terminology officially rendered into English. Protection
of geographical indications and of designations of origin only formally
exists in Britain as EU constructs.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Whiskers
Applied to all sorts of food and drink, not
only wine. Californian cannabis growers are apparently aiming for
similar protected status.
Maybe because registering trademarks is a Federal thing, and the Feds can't
legitimate marijuana-growing?
Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. v Clark, 1871. The Supreme Court ruled that
geographical names designating the good's place of production (as
opposed to the good's producer) cannot be trademarked.
Of course. Trademarks, by their very nature, must be able to distinguish
one producer from another
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
It could be that the appellation scheme would not fly under Federal
trademark law.
It doesn't belong in trademark law. It is /sui generis/.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Nonetheless, Federal trademark law can't be used to trademark a name for an
illegal (Federally) substance, can it?
Why not? The registration of, say, "Autumn Gold" for herbal infusions
would seem to meet the requirements of the Lanham Act (but IANAUSL).
--
Paul
Whiskers
2017-10-10 13:20:18 UTC
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Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Whiskers
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by David Kleinecke
The counties of California’s Emerald Triangle —
Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
producing some of the world’s best cannabis,
but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide California’s cannabis country
into distinctive growing areas called
appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation
It is hard to guess how this will play out.
It is a French term for wine-growing regions. There is a government body
that regulates which wines can be called Burgundies or Champagnes.
As in 'appellation contrôlée' and 'appellation d'origine contrôlée'.
The BrE equivalents are 'protected geographical indication' & 'protected
designation of origin'.
For the avoidance of doubt: that's British-English in the sense of being
European Union terminology officially rendered into English. Protection
of geographical indications and of designations of origin only formally
exists in Britain as EU constructs.
Pending Brexit and the fate of the 'Repeal Bill' etc.
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Whiskers
Applied to all sorts of food and drink, not
only wine. Californian cannabis growers are apparently aiming for
similar protected status.
Maybe because registering trademarks is a Federal thing, and the Feds can't
legitimate marijuana-growing?
Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. v Clark, 1871. The Supreme Court ruled that
geographical names designating the good's place of production (as
opposed to the good's producer) cannot be trademarked.
Of course. Trademarks, by their very nature, must be able to distinguish
one producer from another
The PDO etc system allows for more than one producer to qualify for
using the designation - there are competing makers of Cornish Pasties
and Stilton Cheese, for example; their trademarks and so on are quite
separate from the PDO.
Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
It could be that the appellation scheme would not fly under Federal
trademark law.
It doesn't belong in trademark law. It is /sui generis/.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Nonetheless, Federal trademark law can't be used to trademark a name for an
illegal (Federally) substance, can it?
Why not? The registration of, say, "Autumn Gold" for herbal infusions
would seem to meet the requirements of the Lanham Act (but IANAUSL).
Individual States in the USA do seem to stand up for their own interests
when Federal legislation gets in the way.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
b***@aol.com
2017-10-10 14:59:05 UTC
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Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Whiskers
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by David Kleinecke
The counties of California’s Emerald Triangle —
Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
producing some of the world’s best cannabis,
but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide California’s cannabis country
into distinctive growing areas called
appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation
It is hard to guess how this will play out.
It is a French term for wine-growing regions. There is a government body
that regulates which wines can be called Burgundies or Champagnes.
As in 'appellation contrôlée' and 'appellation d'origine contrôlée'.
The BrE equivalents are 'protected geographical indication' & 'protected
designation of origin'.
No, "appellation contrôlée" is just short for "appellation d'origine
contrôlée" (AOC). "Protected designation of origin" is equivalent to "appellation d'origine protégée" (AOP), which is the EU standard that
substitutes for French AOC on an EU level. AOC and AOP include the
exact same requirements.

"Protected geographical indication" is a different, far less restrictive
EU standard, which only certifies that at least one stage in the wine
making process was performed in a given region.
Post by Paul Wolff
For the avoidance of doubt: that's British-English in the sense of being
European Union terminology officially rendered into English.
Protection
of geographical indications and of designations of origin only formally
exists in Britain as EU constructs.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Whiskers
Applied to all sorts of food and drink, not
only wine. Californian cannabis growers are apparently aiming for
similar protected status.
Maybe because registering trademarks is a Federal thing, and the Feds can't
legitimate marijuana-growing?
Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. v Clark, 1871. The Supreme Court ruled that
geographical names designating the good's place of production (as
opposed to the good's producer) cannot be trademarked.
Of course. Trademarks, by their very nature, must be able to distinguish
one producer from another
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Horace LaBadie
It could be that the appellation scheme would not fly under Federal
trademark law.
It doesn't belong in trademark law. It is /sui generis/.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Nonetheless, Federal trademark law can't be used to trademark a name for an
illegal (Federally) substance, can it?
Why not? The registration of, say, "Autumn Gold" for herbal infusions
would seem to meet the requirements of the Lanham Act (but IANAUSL).
--
Paul
occam
2017-10-11 08:42:40 UTC
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Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Whiskers
On Monday, October 9, 2017 at 3:43:45 PM UTC-4, Whiskers Catwheezel
Post by Whiskers
    The counties of California’s Emerald Triangle —
    Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
    producing some of the world’s best cannabis,
    but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
    Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
    soon become household names under a new program
    designed to divide California’s cannabis country
    into distinctive growing areas called
    appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation
It is hard to guess how this will play out.
It is a French term for wine-growing regions. There is a > >
government body
Post by Whiskers
that regulates which wines can be called Burgundies or Champagnes.
As in 'appellation contrôlée' and 'appellation d'origine contrôlée'.
The BrE equivalents are 'protected geographical indication' &
'protected
Post by Whiskers
designation of origin'.
For the avoidance of doubt: that's British-English in the sense of being
European Union terminology officially rendered into English. Protection
of geographical indications and of designations of origin only formally
exists in Britain as EU constructs.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Whiskers
Post by Whiskers
Applied to all sorts of food and drink, not
only wine.  Californian cannabis growers are apparently aiming for
similar protected status.
Maybe because registering trademarks is a Federal thing, and the Feds can't
legitimate marijuana-growing?
Delaware & Hudson Canal Co. v Clark, 1871. The Supreme Court ruled that
geographical names designating the good's place of production (as
opposed to the good's producer) cannot be trademarked.
Of course. Trademarks, by their very nature, must be able to distinguish
one producer from another
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Whiskers
It could be that the appellation scheme would not fly under Federal
trademark law.
It doesn't belong in trademark law. It is /sui generis/.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Nonetheless, Federal trademark law can't be used to trademark a name for an
illegal (Federally) substance, can it?
Why not? The registration of, say, "Autumn Gold" for herbal infusions
would seem to meet the requirements of the Lanham Act (but IANAUSL).
Is it just me, or does all patent legalese sound like a lot of rhubarb?
Horace LaBadie
2017-10-09 23:16:02 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Nonetheless, Federal trademark law can't be used to trademark a name for an
illegal (Federally) substance, can it?
Illegal products under Federal law cannot be registered, true.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
You mean, a Long Island potato farm could claim they were selling Idaho potatoes?
The Idaho Potato Commission has a registered Certification Mark, which
gets around the SC ruling. The IPC can certify that the russets grown in
Idaho are indeed Idaho Potatoes. Others making that claim would violate
the Certification Mark.
Pierre Jelenc
2017-10-10 23:12:54 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
This afternoon, at my aunt's 100th-birthday party, I learned that my first
cousin once removed is a pretty serious home brewer, and he says NYS law says
he wouldn't be able to market his stuff, or open a brewpub, without meeting a
myriad of requirements -- one of which is using only NYS-grown hops
That's only (partially) true of so-called "Farm Brewery” licenses, which
trade this boosting of NYS agriculture for the right to operate retail
outlets, restaurants, tasting rooms, etc linked to the brewery. Ordinary
breweries are not allowed such privileges.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
(whereas everyone knows the best hops come from Washington
For some value of "everyone" meaning "people who want beer that tastes
like turpentine and grapefruit" ...

Pierre
--
Pierre Jelenc
The Gigometer www.gigometer.com
The NYC Beer Guide www.nycbeer.org
Ken Blake
2017-10-10 00:18:25 UTC
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On Mon, 9 Oct 2017 14:27:37 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe because registering trademarks is a Federal thing, and the Feds can't
legitimate marijuana-growing?
Trademark registration is usually done at the Federal level, but it
can also be done at the State level. See
https://www.uspto.gov/trademarks-getting-started/process-overview/state-trademark-information-links
Whiskers
2017-10-10 13:05:22 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Whiskers
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by David Kleinecke
The counties of California’s Emerald Triangle —
Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
producing some of the world’s best cannabis,
but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide California’s cannabis country
into distinctive growing areas called
appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation
It is hard to guess how this will play out.
It is a French term for wine-growing regions. There is a government body
that regulates which wines can be called Burgundies or Champagnes.
As in 'appellation contrôlée' and 'appellation d'origine contrôlée'.
The BrE equivalents are 'protected geographical indication' & 'protected
designation of origin'. Applied to all sorts of food and drink, not
only wine. Californian cannabis growers are apparently aiming for
similar protected status.
Maybe because registering trademarks is a Federal thing, and the Feds can't
legitimate marijuana-growing?
Melton Mowbray pork pies are a sort of drug, in that eating one leads to
a desire for another ...
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Paul Wolff
2017-10-10 16:03:20 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Whiskers
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by David Kleinecke
The counties of California’s Emerald Triangle —
Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
producing some of the world’s best cannabis,
but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide California’s cannabis country
into distinctive growing areas called
appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation
It is hard to guess how this will play out.
It is a French term for wine-growing regions. There is a government body
that regulates which wines can be called Burgundies or Champagnes.
As in 'appellation contrôlée' and 'appellation d'origine contrôlée'.
The BrE equivalents are 'protected geographical indication' & 'protected
designation of origin'. Applied to all sorts of food and drink, not
only wine. Californian cannabis growers are apparently aiming for
similar protected status.
Perhaps they should go for "Traditional Speciality Guaranteed"
(optionally omitting the second 'i' of Speciality), or TSG, the third of
the triad with PDO and PGI.
Post by Whiskers
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe because registering trademarks is a Federal thing, and the Feds can't
legitimate marijuana-growing?
Federal TM registration requires Federal trade in the goods, which means
trade across a state border. Internal trade can be protected by State TM
registration in many cases, though I don't recall ever trying it.
Post by Whiskers
Melton Mowbray pork pies are a sort of drug, in that eating one leads to
a desire for another ...
That's what a good PGI does for you.

Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes Yorkshire
Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb Triangle. I
can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to SRS (Stuck Rhubarb
Syndrome).
--
Paul
Whiskers
2017-10-10 16:43:06 UTC
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Post by Paul Wolff
Post by Whiskers
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Whiskers
In article
From the latest news: The counties of California’s Emerald
Triangle — Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
producing some of the world’s best cannabis, but how many people
have heard of Honeydew? Or Bell Springs? These regions and many
others may soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide California’s cannabis country into
distinctive growing areas called appellations. Just a mild
extension of the old meaning of appellation It is hard to guess
how this will play out.
It is a French term for wine-growing regions. There is a
government body that regulates which wines can be called
Burgundies or Champagnes.
As in 'appellation contrôlée' and 'appellation d'origine
contrôlée'. The BrE equivalents are 'protected geographical
indication' & 'protected designation of origin'. Applied to all
sorts of food and drink, not only wine. Californian cannabis
growers are apparently aiming for similar protected status.
Perhaps they should go for "Traditional Speciality Guaranteed"
(optionally omitting the second 'i' of Speciality), or TSG, the third
of the triad with PDO and PGI.
Post by Whiskers
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Maybe because registering trademarks is a Federal thing, and the
Feds can't legitimate marijuana-growing?
Federal TM registration requires Federal trade in the goods, which
means trade across a state border. Internal trade can be protected by
State TM registration in many cases, though I don't recall ever trying
it.
Post by Whiskers
Melton Mowbray pork pies are a sort of drug, in that eating one leads
to a desire for another ...
That's what a good PGI does for you.
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes Yorkshire
Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb Triangle. I
can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to SRS (Stuck
Rhubarb Syndrome).
I thought rhubarb was meant to help get one un-stuck ...
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-10 20:54:04 UTC
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Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes Yorkshire
Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb Triangle. I
can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to SRS (Stuck Rhubarb
Syndrome).
How can you force a rhubarb to do _anything_? Seems like they'd be even less
amenable than cats.
Horace LaBadie
2017-10-10 23:29:19 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes Yorkshire
Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb Triangle. I
can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to SRS (Stuck Rhubarb
Syndrome).
How can you force a rhubarb to do _anything_? Seems like they'd be even less
amenable than cats.
Tulips have to be refrigerated before they can be forced. Rhubarb has to
be kept in the dark, like voters.

Then there was that baseball movie about Rhubarb the cat, starring Ray
Milland.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2017-10-11 09:16:03 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes
Yorkshire Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb
Triangle. I can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to
SRS (Stuck Rhubarb Syndrome).
How can you force a rhubarb to do _anything_? Seems like they'd be
even less amenable than cats.
Tulips have to be refrigerated before they can be forced. Rhubarb has
to be kept in the dark, like voters.
Then there was that baseball movie about Rhubarb the cat, starring Ray
Milland.
Roobarb was the dog, Custard was the cat.

musika
2017-10-11 11:15:25 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Horace LaBadie
Then there was that baseball movie about Rhubarb the cat, starring Ray
Milland.
Roobarb was the dog, Custard was the cat.
http://youtu.be/N6rCnpFJCI8
Different Rhubarb.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Rhubarb_(1951_film)
--
Ray
UK
GordonD
2017-10-11 12:07:38 UTC
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Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes
Yorkshire Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb
Triangle. I can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to
SRS (Stuck Rhubarb Syndrome).
How can you force a rhubarb to do _anything_? Seems like they'd be
even less amenable than cats.
Tulips have to be refrigerated before they can be forced. Rhubarb has
to be kept in the dark, like voters.
Then there was that baseball movie about Rhubarb the cat, starring Ray
Milland.
Roobarb was the dog, Custard was the cat.
http://youtu.be/N6rCnpFJCI8
Thanks. Even without clicking on the link I have that bloody tune going
round and round inside my head.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Kerr-Mudd,John
2017-10-12 10:38:25 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes
Yorkshire Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb
Triangle. I can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to
SRS (Stuck Rhubarb Syndrome).
How can you force a rhubarb to do _anything_? Seems like they'd be
even less amenable than cats.
Tulips have to be refrigerated before they can be forced. Rhubarb has
to be kept in the dark, like voters.
Then there was that baseball movie about Rhubarb the cat, starring Ray
Milland.
Roobarb was the dog, Custard was the cat.
http://youtu.be/N6rCnpFJCI8
Thanks. Even without clicking on the link I have that bloody tune going
round and round inside my head.
Ah nostalgia! (better than neuralgia).

Peter Moylan
2017-10-11 00:46:29 UTC
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Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes Yorkshire
Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb Triangle. I
can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to SRS (Stuck Rhubarb
Syndrome).
We had forced rhubarb WIWAL, straight from the back yard. Even if we
didn't like it we were forced to eat it.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-11 03:17:48 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes Yorkshire
Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb Triangle. I
can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to SRS (Stuck Rhubarb
Syndrome).
We had forced rhubarb WIWAL, straight from the back yard. Even if we
didn't like it we were forced to eat it.
My mother once brought home a strawberry-rhubarb pie. I tasted it. I never went
near rhubarb again.
charles
2017-10-11 06:03:10 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes Yorkshire
Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb Triangle. I
can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to SRS (Stuck
Rhubarb Syndrome).
We had forced rhubarb WIWAL, straight from the back yard. Even if we
didn't like it we were forced to eat it.
My mother once brought home a strawberry-rhubarb pie. I tasted it. I
never went near rhubarb again.
I believe rhubarb to be part of a plot by sugar processors to increase
their sales
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
b***@shaw.ca
2017-10-11 08:03:49 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes Yorkshire
Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb Triangle. I
can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to SRS (Stuck
Rhubarb Syndrome).
We had forced rhubarb WIWAL, straight from the back yard. Even if we
didn't like it we were forced to eat it.
My mother once brought home a strawberry-rhubarb pie. I tasted it. I
never went near rhubarb again.
I believe rhubarb to be part of a plot by sugar processors to increase
their sales
I have tasted fruit-and-rhubarb pie that I liked a lot. The sweetness of the fruit interacts with the tart taste of the rhubarb, very pleasantly so if the baker gets the balance right. However, I have not been tempted to look for and try recipes with rhubarb in them.

bill
Snidely
2017-10-11 08:49:18 UTC
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Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes Yorkshire
Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb Triangle. I
can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to SRS (Stuck
Rhubarb Syndrome).
We had forced rhubarb WIWAL, straight from the back yard. Even if we
didn't like it we were forced to eat it.
My mother once brought home a strawberry-rhubarb pie. I tasted it. I
never went near rhubarb again.
I believe rhubarb to be part of a plot by sugar processors to increase
their sales
I have tasted fruit-and-rhubarb pie that I liked a lot. The sweetness of the
fruit interacts with the tart taste of the rhubarb, very pleasantly so if the
baker gets the balance right. However, I have not been tempted to look for
and try recipes with rhubarb in them.
A strawberry-rhubarb chiffon is deliteful.

/dps
--
"I'm glad unicorns don't ever need upgrades."
"We are as up as it is possible to get graded!"
_Phoebe and Her Unicorn_, 2016.05.15
Cheryl
2017-10-11 10:48:20 UTC
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Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes Yorkshire
Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb Triangle. I
can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to SRS (Stuck
Rhubarb Syndrome).
We had forced rhubarb WIWAL, straight from the back yard. Even if we
didn't like it we were forced to eat it.
My mother once brought home a strawberry-rhubarb pie. I tasted it. I
never went near rhubarb again.
I believe rhubarb to be part of a plot by sugar processors to increase
their sales
I have tasted fruit-and-rhubarb pie that I liked a lot. The sweetness of the fruit interacts with the tart taste of the rhubarb, very pleasantly so if the baker gets the balance right. However, I have not been tempted to look for and try recipes with rhubarb in them.
My mother used to make delicious rhubarb pie, although I also find
strawberry/rhubarb pie very good. I think that is made where
strawberries are cheaper and/or more readily available than they were in
my old hometown. If we got strawberries, we didn't mix them with
rhubarb, we used them on their own.

Stewed rhubarb is delicious on toast or mixed with hot cereal and plain
yogurt. It's made like a very simple jam - slowly simmered with a tiny
bit of water (most of the liquid comes of the rhubarb) and sugar to
taste; I like it on the tart side.

Don't eat the leaves; supposedly the oxalic acid levels in them are high
enough to harm a human.
--
Cheryl
Katy Jennison
2017-10-11 19:39:56 UTC
Reply
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Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes Yorkshire
Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb Triangle. I
can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to SRS (Stuck
Rhubarb Syndrome).
We had forced rhubarb WIWAL, straight from the back yard. Even if we
didn't like it we were forced to eat it.
My mother once brought home a strawberry-rhubarb pie. I tasted it. I
never went near rhubarb again.
I believe rhubarb to be part of a plot by sugar processors to increase
their sales
I have tasted fruit-and-rhubarb pie that I liked a lot. The sweetness of the fruit interacts with the tart taste of the rhubarb, very pleasantly so if the baker gets the balance right. However, I have not been tempted to look for and try recipes with rhubarb in them.
Rhubarb is particularly good for cleaning aluminium pans.
--
Katy Jennison
Whiskers
2017-10-11 22:11:12 UTC
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Post by Katy Jennison
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes
Yorkshire Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the
Rhubarb Triangle. I can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may
lead to SRS (Stuck Rhubarb Syndrome).
We had forced rhubarb WIWAL, straight from the back yard. Even if
we didn't like it we were forced to eat it.
My mother once brought home a strawberry-rhubarb pie. I tasted it.
I never went near rhubarb again.
I believe rhubarb to be part of a plot by sugar processors to
increase their sales
I have tasted fruit-and-rhubarb pie that I liked a lot. The sweetness
of the fruit interacts with the tart taste of the rhubarb, very
pleasantly so if the baker gets the balance right. However, I have
not been tempted to look for and try recipes with rhubarb in them.
Rhubarb is particularly good for cleaning aluminium pans.
In the sense of 'dissolving aluminium'. Cooking rhubarb in an aluminium
saucepan will ruin both the pan and the rhubarb. You might get away
with it if there's an intact impermeable 'non-stick coating' on the pan,
but I'd use cast iron or stainless steel or glass or ceramic.
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Tony Cooper
2017-10-11 22:24:56 UTC
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On Wed, 11 Oct 2017 23:11:12 +0100, Whiskers
Post by Whiskers
Post by Katy Jennison
Rhubarb is particularly good for cleaning aluminium pans.
In the sense of 'dissolving aluminium'. Cooking rhubarb in an aluminium
saucepan will ruin both the pan and the rhubarb.
Rhubarb, as far as I'm concerned, comes pre-ruined.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Janet
2017-10-12 01:44:11 UTC
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In article <orls2b$95k$***@news.albasani.net>, ***@spamtrap.kjennison.com
says...
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes Yorkshire
Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb Triangle. I
can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to SRS (Stuck
Rhubarb Syndrome).
We had forced rhubarb WIWAL, straight from the back yard. Even if we
didn't like it we were forced to eat it.
My mother once brought home a strawberry-rhubarb pie. I tasted it. I
never went near rhubarb again.
I believe rhubarb to be part of a plot by sugar processors to increase
their sales
I have tasted fruit-and-rhubarb pie that I liked a lot. The sweetness of the fruit interacts with the tart taste of the rhubarb, very pleasantly so if the baker gets the balance right. However, I have not been tempted to look for and try recipes with rhubarb in them.
Rhubarb is particularly good for cleaning aluminium pans.
I seem to be the only person here who truly appreciates rhubarb and
commas.

Janet
Mack A. Damia
2017-10-12 02:10:59 UTC
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Post by Janet
says...
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes Yorkshire
Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb Triangle. I
can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to SRS (Stuck
Rhubarb Syndrome).
We had forced rhubarb WIWAL, straight from the back yard. Even if we
didn't like it we were forced to eat it.
My mother once brought home a strawberry-rhubarb pie. I tasted it. I
never went near rhubarb again.
I believe rhubarb to be part of a plot by sugar processors to increase
their sales
I have tasted fruit-and-rhubarb pie that I liked a lot. The sweetness of the fruit interacts with the tart taste of the rhubarb, very pleasantly so if the baker gets the balance right. However, I have not been tempted to look for and try recipes with rhubarb in them.
Rhubarb is particularly good for cleaning aluminium pans.
I seem to be the only person here who truly appreciates rhubarb and
commas.
Rhubarb is a very effective laxative, Janet, and you need that.

Careful with commas, though. They can leave you detached.
Cheryl
2017-10-12 09:57:10 UTC
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Post by Janet
says...
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by charles
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes Yorkshire
Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb Triangle. I
can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to SRS (Stuck
Rhubarb Syndrome).
We had forced rhubarb WIWAL, straight from the back yard. Even if we
didn't like it we were forced to eat it.
My mother once brought home a strawberry-rhubarb pie. I tasted it. I
never went near rhubarb again.
I believe rhubarb to be part of a plot by sugar processors to increase
their sales
I have tasted fruit-and-rhubarb pie that I liked a lot. The sweetness of the fruit interacts with the tart taste of the rhubarb, very pleasantly so if the baker gets the balance right. However, I have not been tempted to look for and try recipes with rhubarb in them.
Rhubarb is particularly good for cleaning aluminium pans.
I seem to be the only person here who truly appreciates rhubarb and
commas.
I'm very fond of rhubarb, although I don't have strong feelings about
commas.
--
Cheryl
Cheryl
2017-10-11 10:43:52 UTC
Reply
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Paul Wolff
Wikipedia's list of current UK protected products includes Yorkshire
Forced Rhubarb, a PDO requiring production in the Rhubarb Triangle. I
can't stop thinking of it. I'm afraid it may lead to SRS (Stuck Rhubarb
Syndrome).
We had forced rhubarb WIWAL, straight from the back yard. Even if we
didn't like it we were forced to eat it.
Our rhubarb grew without being forced to. I still love the stuff,
although I no longer grow it.
--
Cheryl
Richard Tobin
2017-10-10 18:54:23 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Melton Mowbray pork pies are a sort of drug, in that eating one leads to
a desire for another ...
I was pleased to see that a Melton Mowbray pork pie I was eating
contained a mere 2% of the annual recommended amount of saturated fat.

-- Richard
charles
2017-10-10 19:50:06 UTC
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Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Whiskers
Melton Mowbray pork pies are a sort of drug, in that eating one leads to
a desire for another ...
I was pleased to see that a Melton Mowbray pork pie I was eating
contained a mere 2% of the annual recommended amount of saturated fat.
so you could eat one a week
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
b***@shaw.ca
2017-10-10 23:28:31 UTC
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Post by charles
Post by Richard Tobin
Post by Whiskers
Melton Mowbray pork pies are a sort of drug, in that eating one leads to
a desire for another ...
I was pleased to see that a Melton Mowbray pork pie I was eating
contained a mere 2% of the annual recommended amount of saturated fat.
so you could eat one a week
However, on the day that you eat it, you'll be taking in 730 per cent of the *daily* recommended amount of saturated fat.

bill
occam
2017-10-11 08:31:38 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by David Kleinecke
The counties of California’s Emerald Triangle —
Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity — are famous for
producing some of the world’s best cannabis,
but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide California’s cannabis country
into distinctive growing areas called
appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation
It is hard to guess how this will play out.
It is a French term for wine-growing regions. There is a government body
that regulates which wines can be called Burgundies or Champagnes.
As in 'appellation contrôlée' and 'appellation d'origine contrôlée'.
The BrE equivalents are 'protected geographical indication' & 'protected
designation of origin'. Applied to all sorts of food and drink, not
only wine.
Californian cannabis growers are apparently aiming for
similar protected status.
The other interpretation is that they are attempting to get a "higher"
status by associating marijuana with wines. Fair game.
J. J. Lodder
2017-10-10 14:42:55 UTC
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Post by Horace LaBadie
The counties of Californiaâ•˙s Emerald Triangle ╉
Humboldt, Mendocino, Trinity ╉ are famous for
producing some of the worldâ•˙s best cannabis,
but how many people have heard of Honeydew? Or
Bell Springs? These regions and many others may
soon become household names under a new program
designed to divide Californiaâ•˙s cannabis country
into distinctive growing areas called
appellations.
Just a mild extension of the old meaning of appellation
It is hard to guess how this will play out.
It is a French term for wine-growing regions. There is a government body
that regulates which wines can be called Burgundies or Champagnes.
European nowadays, and by trade agreement
also in other parts of the world.
For example, Australians have agreed that they can't make Champagne,
and in return Australian denominations are protected in Europe,

Jan
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