Discussion:
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
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Harrison Hill
2017-10-06 17:32:01 UTC
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One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"

You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your
apostrophe?
Neill Massello
2017-10-06 17:37:04 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your
apostrophe?
Where do mountains have their eyes?
Harrison Hill
2017-10-06 17:44:18 UTC
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Post by Neill Massello
Post by Harrison Hill
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your
apostrophe?
Where do mountains have their eyes?
The views of the mountains have their eyes in the
beholder of that view/those views. There can be many
views of many mountains.

I'm speculating that you are Canadian :)
Peter Young
2017-10-06 18:23:32 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your
apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?

Peter.

ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let anyone
say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying this means
one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Pt)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
CDB
2017-10-06 21:02:22 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?
One could get away with "the mountain views" around here.
Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let
anyone say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying
this means one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.
They was* unhappy with your rhetoric?
_____________________________________________
*ObCurrent hobby-horse: IMO the indefinite "they" should take a singular
verb. It's almost always used as a plural (How is your one surviving
parent? They are fine, thanks), probably on the model of the 'singular'
"you". But that "you" is explicitly a plural, used at first in
deference and afterwards in courtesy, something like the royal "we".
Queen Victoria would not have said "we am not amused", because the point
was that she was too grand for the singular.

The indefinite "they", however, when standing for one person, has no
such hierarchical function, and ought to recognise the fact by governing
a singular verb. People would get used to it.
GordonD
2017-10-07 09:24:33 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?
One could get away with "the mountain views" around here.
Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let
anyone say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying
this means one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.
They was* unhappy with your rhetoric?
_____________________________________________
*ObCurrent hobby-horse: IMO the indefinite "they" should take a singular
verb.  It's almost always used as a plural (How is your one surviving
parent?  They are fine, thanks), probably on the model of the 'singular'
"you".  But that "you" is explicitly a plural, used at first in
deference and afterwards in courtesy, something like the royal "we".
Queen Victoria would not have said "we am not amused", because the point
was that she was too grand for the singular.
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We are a
grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
--
Gordon Davie
Edinburgh, Scotland
Cheryl
2017-10-07 11:13:15 UTC
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Post by GordonD
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?
One could get away with "the mountain views" around here.
Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let
anyone say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying
this means one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.
They was* unhappy with your rhetoric?
_____________________________________________
*ObCurrent hobby-horse: IMO the indefinite "they" should take a singular
verb.  It's almost always used as a plural (How is your one surviving
parent?  They are fine, thanks), probably on the model of the 'singular'
"you".  But that "you" is explicitly a plural, used at first in
deference and afterwards in courtesy, something like the royal "we".
Queen Victoria would not have said "we am not amused", because the point
was that she was too grand for the singular.
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We are a
grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant", which to me seems
to indicate more ignorance of biology than is possible under the
circumstances.

I know it's intended to indicate the pleasure of both parents with
upcoming event, but it still sounds odd to me.
--
Cheryl
Neill Massello
2017-10-07 12:47:47 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant", which to me seems
to indicate more ignorance of biology than is possible under the
circumstances.
You are gender stereotyping. Who are you to say that we can't be
pregnant if we feels like it?
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-10-07 13:29:47 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?
One could get away with "the mountain views" around here.
Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let
anyone say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying
this means one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.
They was* unhappy with your rhetoric?
_____________________________________________
*ObCurrent hobby-horse: IMO the indefinite "they" should take a singular
verb.  It's almost always used as a plural (How is your one surviving
parent?  They are fine, thanks), probably on the model of the 'singular'
"you".  But that "you" is explicitly a plural, used at first in
deference and afterwards in courtesy, something like the royal "we".
Queen Victoria would not have said "we am not amused", because the point
was that she was too grand for the singular.
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We are a
grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant", which to me seems
to indicate more ignorance of biology than is possible under the
circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family pet.
Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the arrival of a baby
daughter". ??
Post by Cheryl
I know it's intended to indicate the pleasure of both parents with
upcoming event, but it still sounds odd to me.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Cheryl
2017-10-07 14:26:48 UTC
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Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?
One could get away with "the mountain views" around here.
Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let
anyone say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying
this means one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.
They was* unhappy with your rhetoric?
_____________________________________________
*ObCurrent hobby-horse: IMO the indefinite "they" should take a singular
verb.  It's almost always used as a plural (How is your one surviving
parent?  They are fine, thanks), probably on the model of the 'singular'
"you".  But that "you" is explicitly a plural, used at first in
deference and afterwards in courtesy, something like the royal "we".
Queen Victoria would not have said "we am not amused", because the point
was that she was too grand for the singular.
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We are a
grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant", which to me seems
to indicate more ignorance of biology than is possible under the
circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family pet.
Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the arrival of a baby
daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't talk of them
as though they were my children. Some people do - they sign cards etc
from their pet, just as they do from their spouse and children.
--
Cheryl
Mack A. Damia
2017-10-07 15:02:53 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?
One could get away with "the mountain views" around here.
Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let
anyone say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying
this means one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.
They was* unhappy with your rhetoric?
_____________________________________________
*ObCurrent hobby-horse: IMO the indefinite "they" should take a singular
verb.  It's almost always used as a plural (How is your one surviving
parent?  They are fine, thanks), probably on the model of the 'singular'
"you".  But that "you" is explicitly a plural, used at first in
deference and afterwards in courtesy, something like the royal "we".
Queen Victoria would not have said "we am not amused", because the point
was that she was too grand for the singular.
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We are a
grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant", which to me seems
to indicate more ignorance of biology than is possible under the
circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family pet.
Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the arrival of a baby
daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't talk of them
as though they were my children. Some people do - they sign cards etc
from their pet, just as they do from their spouse and children.
But do you sing to them?

"Every little breeze seems to whisper Bubba....."
CDB
2017-10-07 17:11:15 UTC
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[eating for three]
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We are a
grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant", which to
me seems to indicate more ignorance of biology than is possible
under the circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family
pet. Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the
arrival of a baby daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't talk of
them as though they were my children. Some people do - they sign
cards etc from their pet, just as they do from their spouse and
children.
I have done that, but only for people I knew would welcome it.
Post by Mack A. Damia
But do you sing to them?
"Every little breeze seems to whisper Bubba....."
Every little breeze whispers "Give Bubba cheese",
Birds in the trees twitter "Don't be a tease,
Don't make him seize it, quickly release it;
Please be easy ..."
Mack A. Damia
2017-10-07 18:52:41 UTC
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Post by CDB
[eating for three]
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We are a
grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant", which to
me seems to indicate more ignorance of biology than is possible
under the circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family
pet. Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the
arrival of a baby daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't talk of
them as though they were my children. Some people do - they sign
cards etc from their pet, just as they do from their spouse and
children.
I have done that, but only for people I knew would welcome it.
Post by Mack A. Damia
But do you sing to them?
"Every little breeze seems to whisper Bubba....."
Every little breeze whispers "Give Bubba cheese",
Birds in the trees twitter "Don't be a tease,
Don't make him seize it, quickly release it;
Please be easy ..."
Bubba is a girl. She doesn't eat cheese; it makes her flatulent.
Neill Massello
2017-10-07 21:12:46 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Bubba is a girl. She doesn't eat cheese; it makes her flatulent.
Pippa passes, Bubba farts, all's right with the world.
Mack A. Damia
2017-10-07 22:27:20 UTC
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Post by Neill Massello
Post by Mack A. Damia
Bubba is a girl. She doesn't eat cheese; it makes her flatulent.
Pippa passes, Bubba farts, all's right with the world.
Excuse me. Bubba breaks wind. She does not fart.
CDB
2017-10-08 12:46:34 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
[eating for three]
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We
are a grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant",
which to me seems to indicate more ignorance of biology
than is possible under the circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family
pet. Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the
arrival of a baby daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't
talk of them as though they were my children. Some people do -
they sign cards etc from their pet, just as they do from their
spouse and children.
I have done that, but only for people I knew would welcome it.
Post by Mack A. Damia
But do you sing to them?
"Every little breeze seems to whisper Bubba....."
Every little breeze whispers "Give Bubba cheese", Birds in the
trees twitter "Don't be a tease, Don't make him seize it, quickly
release it; Please be easy ..."
Bubba is a girl.
"Don't make zem* seize it".
Post by Mack A. Damia
She doesn't eat cheese; it makes her flatulent
But that's your decision and the breeze's, not hers, right?
___________________________________________________________
*Zat, I mean that, and the voiced pronunciation of "release" can be
blamed on Maurice Chevalier, if you want to blame somebody.
Mack A. Damia
2017-10-08 15:48:41 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
[eating for three]
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We
are a grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant",
which to me seems to indicate more ignorance of biology
than is possible under the circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family
pet. Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the
arrival of a baby daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't
talk of them as though they were my children. Some people do -
they sign cards etc from their pet, just as they do from their
spouse and children.
I have done that, but only for people I knew would welcome it.
Post by Mack A. Damia
But do you sing to them?
"Every little breeze seems to whisper Bubba....."
Every little breeze whispers "Give Bubba cheese", Birds in the
trees twitter "Don't be a tease, Don't make him seize it, quickly
release it; Please be easy ..."
Bubba is a girl.
"Don't make zem* seize it".
Post by Mack A. Damia
She doesn't eat cheese; it makes her flatulent
But that's your decision and the breeze's, not hers, right?
I feed them dry cat food and Fancy Feast.

Both of my puddy-tats love the Fancy Feast, but they do not like the
variety containing cheese bits. They will eat it begrudgingly, but
they will always leave some. Otherwise, they lick the bowls.
Post by CDB
___________________________________________________________
*Zat, I mean that, and the voiced pronunciation of "release" can be
blamed on Maurice Chevalier, if you want to blame somebody.
I also sing, "Birds in the trees, whisper were is Bub-ba"?

Daddy loves Bubba. She talks to me.

******

Good morning Ladies and Gentlemen!~

This is The Knack on WAUE

WAUE Tune Time is 8:40 am

Traffic is bumper-to-bumper in San Miguel. Surf's UP.

This soul song was written by Thom Bell and Linda Creed and recorded
by a group that established the "Philly Soul Sound".

The song was released as a single in 1971 and reached #9 on the U.S.
Billboard Hot 100 chart. In addition, it also climbed to #10 in the
Billboard R&B chart and reached number #24 in the Billboard Easy
Listening chart.

The recording sold over one million copies globally, earning the band
a gold disc. The award was presented by the RIAA on January 3, 1972.
It was the band's first gold disc.

The song was used in two episodes of the TV series The Wonder Years,
entitled "Denial" and "Double Double Date". It was also used in a 2002
episode of The King of Queens, called "Business Affairs". The song was
featured at a dance in the 2005 comedy, The Ringer.

The band is a Philadelphia soul group that achieved its greatest chart
success in the 1970s. They formed in 1968, consisting of singers
Russell Thompkins, Jr., Herb Murrell, Airrion Love, James Smith, and
James Dunn. All of their US hits were ballads characterized by the
falsetto of Russell Thompkins, Jr. and the production of Thom Bell.
During the early 1970s, the group had twelve consecutive R&B top ten
hits.

This song goes out to the memory of Dixie and to all AUE pussy cat
lovers.

Anybody who was into the music scene in the 1970s will remember and
cherish this hit by the Stylistics.

This is The Knack on WAUE, and this is Rock 'n Roll.....



WAUE Tune Time is 8:48 am.
Richard Yates
2017-10-08 19:41:23 UTC
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On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 08:48:41 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
[eating for three]
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We
are a grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant",
which to me seems to indicate more ignorance of biology
than is possible under the circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family
pet. Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the
arrival of a baby daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't
talk of them as though they were my children. Some people do -
they sign cards etc from their pet, just as they do from their
spouse and children.
I have done that, but only for people I knew would welcome it.
Post by Mack A. Damia
But do you sing to them?
"Every little breeze seems to whisper Bubba....."
Every little breeze whispers "Give Bubba cheese", Birds in the
trees twitter "Don't be a tease, Don't make him seize it, quickly
release it; Please be easy ..."
Bubba is a girl.
"Don't make zem* seize it".
Post by Mack A. Damia
She doesn't eat cheese; it makes her flatulent
But that's your decision and the breeze's, not hers, right?
I feed them dry cat food and Fancy Feast.
Both of my puddy-tats love the Fancy Feast, but they do not like the
variety containing cheese bits. They will eat it begrudgingly, but
they will always leave some. Otherwise, they lick the bowls.
I was at PetSmart the other day looking for a particular brand of cat
food recommended by the vet for a suddenly non-eating cat. They did
not have it (takes a prescription!) so I asked the clerk what he
suggested. He said to go over to "the junk food aisle."

That's where all the Fancy Feast was.
Cheryl
2017-10-08 20:06:15 UTC
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Post by Richard Yates
I was at PetSmart the other day looking for a particular brand of cat
food recommended by the vet for a suddenly non-eating cat. They did
not have it (takes a prescription!) so I asked the clerk what he
suggested. He said to go over to "the junk food aisle."
That's where all the Fancy Feast was.
I sometimes use Fancy Feast as a treat, but got in the habit of feeding
my cats dry food after a long-ago cat vomited a lot, even for a cat. The
vet said she wasn't sick, she was a "chronic vomiter" and part of the
cause might be her tendency to bolt down her food, which upset her
stomach so it came right back up a lot of the time. Canned food often
tended to trigger this reaction, so she got it very rarely.

Anyway, I've been in the habit of buying something that's kind of middle
of the road - not the cheapest available, but not the stuff you can only
buy in a vet's office either, which the current cats thrive on; in fact,
one of them manages to stay at a weight that the vet thinks is excessive
even with only carefully measured small portions of the stuff. Last time
I bought food, I happened to pick up another brand. This is clearly junk
food for cats. It's disappearing far faster than the usual stuff.
--
Cheryl

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Mack A. Damia
2017-10-08 20:13:38 UTC
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On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 12:41:23 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 08:48:41 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
[eating for three]
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We
are a grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant",
which to me seems to indicate more ignorance of biology
than is possible under the circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family
pet. Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the
arrival of a baby daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't
talk of them as though they were my children. Some people do -
they sign cards etc from their pet, just as they do from their
spouse and children.
I have done that, but only for people I knew would welcome it.
Post by Mack A. Damia
But do you sing to them?
"Every little breeze seems to whisper Bubba....."
Every little breeze whispers "Give Bubba cheese", Birds in the
trees twitter "Don't be a tease, Don't make him seize it, quickly
release it; Please be easy ..."
Bubba is a girl.
"Don't make zem* seize it".
Post by Mack A. Damia
She doesn't eat cheese; it makes her flatulent
But that's your decision and the breeze's, not hers, right?
I feed them dry cat food and Fancy Feast.
Both of my puddy-tats love the Fancy Feast, but they do not like the
variety containing cheese bits. They will eat it begrudgingly, but
they will always leave some. Otherwise, they lick the bowls.
I was at PetSmart the other day looking for a particular brand of cat
food recommended by the vet for a suddenly non-eating cat. They did
not have it (takes a prescription!) so I asked the clerk what he
suggested. He said to go over to "the junk food aisle."
That's where all the Fancy Feast was.
I have heard that about the "Classic" variety. It is like "pâté with
lots of cereal fillers. My cats will not touch it. The "grilled" and
"feast" (with gravy) do not contain fillers.

They will not touch any of the Mexican-produced Fancy Feast, either.

Why would the store clerk recommend something from the "junk food
aisle" if you were looking for a special diet? Doesn't make sense.

My cats are very healthy.

I am sure that you must know that all dog and cat food sold in the USA
are fit for human consumption.
Ken Blake
2017-10-08 20:54:48 UTC
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On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 13:13:38 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
I am sure that you must know that all dog and cat food sold in the USA
are fit for human consumption.
I don't even think that all of the food sold for humans in the USA is
fit for human consumption. <g>
Richard Yates
2017-10-08 21:14:07 UTC
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On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 13:13:38 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 12:41:23 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 08:48:41 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
[eating for three]
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We
are a grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant",
which to me seems to indicate more ignorance of biology
than is possible under the circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family
pet. Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the
arrival of a baby daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't
talk of them as though they were my children. Some people do -
they sign cards etc from their pet, just as they do from their
spouse and children.
I have done that, but only for people I knew would welcome it.
Post by Mack A. Damia
But do you sing to them?
"Every little breeze seems to whisper Bubba....."
Every little breeze whispers "Give Bubba cheese", Birds in the
trees twitter "Don't be a tease, Don't make him seize it, quickly
release it; Please be easy ..."
Bubba is a girl.
"Don't make zem* seize it".
Post by Mack A. Damia
She doesn't eat cheese; it makes her flatulent
But that's your decision and the breeze's, not hers, right?
I feed them dry cat food and Fancy Feast.
Both of my puddy-tats love the Fancy Feast, but they do not like the
variety containing cheese bits. They will eat it begrudgingly, but
they will always leave some. Otherwise, they lick the bowls.
I was at PetSmart the other day looking for a particular brand of cat
food recommended by the vet for a suddenly non-eating cat. They did
not have it (takes a prescription!) so I asked the clerk what he
suggested. He said to go over to "the junk food aisle."
That's where all the Fancy Feast was.
I have heard that about the "Classic" variety. It is like "pâté with
lots of cereal fillers. My cats will not touch it. The "grilled" and
"feast" (with gravy) do not contain fillers.
They will not touch any of the Mexican-produced Fancy Feast, either.
Why would the store clerk recommend something from the "junk food
aisle" if you were looking for a special diet? Doesn't make sense.
As I wrote, it was to try to get a cat to start eating again. (Works
for me to Burger King)
Post by Mack A. Damia
My cats are very healthy.
I am sure that you must know that all dog and cat food sold in the USA
are fit for human consumption.
What an odd thing to be sure about.
Mack A. Damia
2017-10-08 21:29:39 UTC
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On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 14:14:07 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 13:13:38 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 12:41:23 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 08:48:41 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
[eating for three]
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We
are a grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant",
which to me seems to indicate more ignorance of biology
than is possible under the circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family
pet. Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the
arrival of a baby daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't
talk of them as though they were my children. Some people do -
they sign cards etc from their pet, just as they do from their
spouse and children.
I have done that, but only for people I knew would welcome it.
Post by Mack A. Damia
But do you sing to them?
"Every little breeze seems to whisper Bubba....."
Every little breeze whispers "Give Bubba cheese", Birds in the
trees twitter "Don't be a tease, Don't make him seize it, quickly
release it; Please be easy ..."
Bubba is a girl.
"Don't make zem* seize it".
Post by Mack A. Damia
She doesn't eat cheese; it makes her flatulent
But that's your decision and the breeze's, not hers, right?
I feed them dry cat food and Fancy Feast.
Both of my puddy-tats love the Fancy Feast, but they do not like the
variety containing cheese bits. They will eat it begrudgingly, but
they will always leave some. Otherwise, they lick the bowls.
I was at PetSmart the other day looking for a particular brand of cat
food recommended by the vet for a suddenly non-eating cat. They did
not have it (takes a prescription!) so I asked the clerk what he
suggested. He said to go over to "the junk food aisle."
That's where all the Fancy Feast was.
I have heard that about the "Classic" variety. It is like "pâté with
lots of cereal fillers. My cats will not touch it. The "grilled" and
"feast" (with gravy) do not contain fillers.
They will not touch any of the Mexican-produced Fancy Feast, either.
Why would the store clerk recommend something from the "junk food
aisle" if you were looking for a special diet? Doesn't make sense.
As I wrote, it was to try to get a cat to start eating again. (Works
for me to Burger King)
Post by Mack A. Damia
My cats are very healthy.
I am sure that you must know that all dog and cat food sold in the USA
are fit for human consumption.
What an odd thing to be sure about.
You might think differently if you were homeless and broke.

I worked with a middle-aged teacher at school in Harlem who had a loft
in Soho by herself. That must have cost her a bundle.

I drove her home for a short while, and the deal was that she would
make me lunch - a sandwich and maybe some celery/carrot sticks.

She was using old stale bread, and I am almost certain that she spread
cat food on the bread to make the sandwich. She owned a few cats.

Our deal didn't last too long.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2017-10-08 22:24:14 UTC
Reply
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On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 14:29:39 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 14:14:07 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 13:13:38 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 12:41:23 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 08:48:41 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
[eating for three]
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We
are a grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant",
which to me seems to indicate more ignorance of biology
than is possible under the circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family
pet. Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the
arrival of a baby daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't
talk of them as though they were my children. Some people do -
they sign cards etc from their pet, just as they do from their
spouse and children.
I have done that, but only for people I knew would welcome it.
Post by Mack A. Damia
But do you sing to them?
"Every little breeze seems to whisper Bubba....."
Every little breeze whispers "Give Bubba cheese", Birds in the
trees twitter "Don't be a tease, Don't make him seize it, quickly
release it; Please be easy ..."
Bubba is a girl.
"Don't make zem* seize it".
Post by Mack A. Damia
She doesn't eat cheese; it makes her flatulent
But that's your decision and the breeze's, not hers, right?
I feed them dry cat food and Fancy Feast.
Both of my puddy-tats love the Fancy Feast, but they do not like the
variety containing cheese bits. They will eat it begrudgingly, but
they will always leave some. Otherwise, they lick the bowls.
I was at PetSmart the other day looking for a particular brand of cat
food recommended by the vet for a suddenly non-eating cat. They did
not have it (takes a prescription!) so I asked the clerk what he
suggested. He said to go over to "the junk food aisle."
That's where all the Fancy Feast was.
I have heard that about the "Classic" variety. It is like "pâté with
lots of cereal fillers. My cats will not touch it. The "grilled" and
"feast" (with gravy) do not contain fillers.
They will not touch any of the Mexican-produced Fancy Feast, either.
Why would the store clerk recommend something from the "junk food
aisle" if you were looking for a special diet? Doesn't make sense.
As I wrote, it was to try to get a cat to start eating again. (Works
for me to Burger King)
Post by Mack A. Damia
My cats are very healthy.
I am sure that you must know that all dog and cat food sold in the USA
are fit for human consumption.
What an odd thing to be sure about.
You might think differently if you were homeless and broke.
I worked with a middle-aged teacher at school in Harlem who had a loft
in Soho by herself. That must have cost her a bundle.
I drove her home for a short while, and the deal was that she would
make me lunch - a sandwich and maybe some celery/carrot sticks.
She was using old stale bread, and I am almost certain that she spread
cat food on the bread to make the sandwich. She owned a few cats.
Our deal didn't last too long.
In the UK pet food labels used to have wording such as "Not for human
consumption". That wording was dropped some decades ago. If that wording
is not there then the pet food is safe for humans to eat.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Ken Blake
2017-10-08 22:43:25 UTC
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On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 23:24:14 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
In the UK pet food labels used to have wording such as "Not for human
consumption". That wording was dropped some decades ago. If that wording
is not there then the pet food is safe for humans to eat.
It's hard for me to believe that if something is not safe for humans
to eat that it's safe for cats or dogs.
Janet
2017-10-09 00:49:59 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 23:24:14 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
In the UK pet food labels used to have wording such as "Not for human
consumption". That wording was dropped some decades ago. If that wording
is not there then the pet food is safe for humans to eat.
It's hard for me to believe that if something is not safe for humans
to eat that it's safe for cats or dogs.
Different digestive systems. Unlike humans, cats and dogs can eat
rotten carrion with no ill effects.

Processed petfoods are permitted to contain slaughterhouse by-products
that humans don't consume, like hides, skins, horns, feet, pig bristle,
feather or blood heads of poultry milk production by-products
materials from on-farm slaughter of rabbits or poultry
hatchery waste, eggs, egg by-products and day-old chicks
fish and by-products from fish processing factories. Plus a whole load
of additives such as ash.


Janet.
Jack Campin
2017-10-09 01:09:50 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Ken Blake
It's hard for me to believe that if something is not safe
for humans to eat that it's safe for cats or dogs.
Different digestive systems. Unlike humans, cats and dogs
can eat rotten carrion with no ill effects.
But that won't be in pet food. I once worked in a huge abattoir
sorting out bits of sheep to go into cat food - the inspection
process eliminates any diseased or decayed material at the
earliest possible moment and there is no chance of it getting
into a can.
Post by Janet
Processed petfoods are permitted to contain slaughterhouse by-products
that humans don't consume, like hides, skins, horns, feet, pig bristle,
feather or blood heads of poultry milk production by-products
materials from on-farm slaughter of rabbits or poultry
hatchery waste, eggs, egg by-products and day-old chicks
fish and by-products from fish processing factories.
I very much doubt a lot of that.
Post by Janet
Plus a whole load of additives such as ash.
"Ash" in pet food simply says how much mineral content remains
after you burn it. No ash is added. But that figure does say
why you might not want to eat it - cats (and to a lesser extent
dogs) need more bone in their diet than humans will eat in meat,
since a cat will typically eat small animals nearly whole. So
pet food includes ground-up bones, giving it an icky gritty
texture. Harmless and rich in calcium and phosphorus, but not
very enjoyable if you have two legs.

Cats also need much more arachidonic acid (from saturated fat)
than is good for people, but it would take decades to see the
effect of an elevated level of it in your diet.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------------
e m a i l : j a c k @ c a m p i n . m e . u k
Jack Campin, 11 Third Street, Newtongrange, Midlothian EH22 4PU, Scotland
mobile 07895 860 060 <http://www.campin.me.uk> Twitter: JackCampin
Janet
2017-10-09 12:35:44 UTC
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Subject: Re: One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
Newsgroups: alt.usage.english
Post by Janet
Post by Ken Blake
It's hard for me to believe that if something is not safe
for humans to eat that it's safe for cats or dogs.
Different digestive systems. Unlike humans, cats and dogs
can eat rotten carrion with no ill effects.
But that won't be in pet food. I once worked in a huge abattoir
sorting out bits of sheep to go into cat food - the inspection
process eliminates any diseased or decayed material at the
earliest possible moment and there is no chance of it getting
into a can.
Post by Janet
[quoted text muted]
that humans don't consume, like hides, skins, horns, feet, pig bristle,
feather or blood heads of poultry milk production by-products
materials from on-farm slaughter of rabbits or poultry
hatchery waste, eggs, egg by-products and day-old chicks
fish and by-products from fish processing factories.
I very much doubt a lot of that.
https://www.gov.uk/guidance/using-animal-by-products-to-make-pet-food

scroll to "To make processed pet food

To make any processed pet food, in airtight containers or wrappers or
otherwise, the ABPs you can use are:"

Janet
Post by Janet
Plus a whole load of additives such as ash.
"Ash" in pet food simply says how much mineral content remains
after you burn it. No ash is added. But that figure does say
why you might not want to eat it - cats (and to a lesser extent
dogs) need more bone in their diet than humans will eat in meat,
since a cat will typically eat small animals nearly whole. So
pet food includes ground-up bones, giving it an icky gritty
texture. Harmless and rich in calcium and phosphorus, but not
very enjoyable if you have two legs.
Cats also need much more arachidonic acid (from saturated fat)
than is good for people, but it would take decades to see the
effect of an elevated level of it in your diet.
Richard Yates
2017-10-09 00:51:57 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 23:24:14 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
In the UK pet food labels used to have wording such as "Not for human
consumption". That wording was dropped some decades ago. If that wording
is not there then the pet food is safe for humans to eat.
It's hard for me to believe that if something is not safe for humans
to eat that it's safe for cats or dogs.
Their immune and digestive systems are much sturdier than ours given
all the other things that they eat, and they also do not live very
long and so have less time to accumulate things like heavy metals.
Acceptable levels of mercury in tuna for cats may be higher. I'm just
guessin'.
RH Draney
2017-10-09 01:27:18 UTC
Reply
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Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 23:24:14 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
In the UK pet food labels used to have wording such as "Not for human
consumption". That wording was dropped some decades ago. If that wording
is not there then the pet food is safe for humans to eat.
It's hard for me to believe that if something is not safe for humans
to eat that it's safe for cats or dogs.
Flip side of the business about chocolate, innit?...

Don't remember if I spoke of it here, but a few months back I bought a
package of chocolate-chip cookies that I discovered upon opening had
been sat on at some point in the past...I held on to all the loose
crumbs (in a zipper-seal bag) until I could find out whether it would be
okay to feed them to stray birds (for anyone faced with the same
question, the answer is no)....r
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-09 04:21:27 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Raw Message
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 23:24:14 +0100, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
In the UK pet food labels used to have wording such as "Not for human
consumption". That wording was dropped some decades ago. If that wording
is not there then the pet food is safe for humans to eat.
It's hard for me to believe that if something is not safe for humans
to eat that it's safe for cats or dogs.
We know that the opposite isn't true -- they mustn't have chocolate, for
instance -- so why mightn't it be possible?
Richard Yates
2017-10-09 00:47:52 UTC
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On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 14:29:39 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 14:14:07 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Ken Blake
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 13:13:38 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 12:41:23 -0700, Richard Yates
Post by Richard Yates
On Sun, 08 Oct 2017 08:48:41 -0700, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
[eating for three]
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We
are a grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant",
which to me seems to indicate more ignorance of biology
than is possible under the circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family
pet. Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the
arrival of a baby daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't
talk of them as though they were my children. Some people do -
they sign cards etc from their pet, just as they do from their
spouse and children.
I have done that, but only for people I knew would welcome it.
Post by Mack A. Damia
But do you sing to them?
"Every little breeze seems to whisper Bubba....."
Every little breeze whispers "Give Bubba cheese", Birds in the
trees twitter "Don't be a tease, Don't make him seize it, quickly
release it; Please be easy ..."
Bubba is a girl.
"Don't make zem* seize it".
Post by Mack A. Damia
She doesn't eat cheese; it makes her flatulent
But that's your decision and the breeze's, not hers, right?
I feed them dry cat food and Fancy Feast.
Both of my puddy-tats love the Fancy Feast, but they do not like the
variety containing cheese bits. They will eat it begrudgingly, but
they will always leave some. Otherwise, they lick the bowls.
I was at PetSmart the other day looking for a particular brand of cat
food recommended by the vet for a suddenly non-eating cat. They did
not have it (takes a prescription!) so I asked the clerk what he
suggested. He said to go over to "the junk food aisle."
That's where all the Fancy Feast was.
I have heard that about the "Classic" variety. It is like "pâté with
lots of cereal fillers. My cats will not touch it. The "grilled" and
"feast" (with gravy) do not contain fillers.
They will not touch any of the Mexican-produced Fancy Feast, either.
Why would the store clerk recommend something from the "junk food
aisle" if you were looking for a special diet? Doesn't make sense.
As I wrote, it was to try to get a cat to start eating again. (Works
for me to Burger King)
Post by Mack A. Damia
My cats are very healthy.
I am sure that you must know that all dog and cat food sold in the USA
are fit for human consumption.
What an odd thing to be sure about.
You might think differently if you were homeless and broke.
But since you do not know if I have been homeless and broke, how can
you be sure about what I know?
CDB
2017-10-09 12:44:49 UTC
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Post by Richard Yates
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by CDB
[eating for three]
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing
"We are a grandmother" when her son Mark's wife
gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are
pregnant", which to me seems to indicate more
ignorance of biology than is possible under the
circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved
family pet. Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido"
announce the arrival of a baby daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I
don't talk of them as though they were my children. Some
people do - they sign cards etc from their pet, just as
they do from their spouse and children.
I have done that, but only for people I knew would welcome
it.
Post by Mack A. Damia
But do you sing to them?
"Every little breeze seems to whisper Bubba....."
Every little breeze whispers "Give Bubba cheese", Birds in
the trees twitter "Don't be a tease, Don't make him seize it,
quickly release it; Please be easy ..."
Bubba is a girl.
"Don't make zem* seize it".
Post by Mack A. Damia
She doesn't eat cheese; it makes her flatulent
But that's your decision and the breeze's, not hers, right?
I feed them dry cat food and Fancy Feast.
Both of my puddy-tats love the Fancy Feast, but they do not like
the variety containing cheese bits. They will eat it begrudgingly,
but they will always leave some. Otherwise, they lick the bowls.
I understand they're obligate carnivores. I was confused by the name
"Bubba" into thinking you had a dog. Don't cats have to have glamorous,
romantic names like "Misty" and "Franz Joseph"?
Post by Richard Yates
I was at PetSmart the other day looking for a particular brand of
cat food recommended by the vet for a suddenly non-eating cat. They
did not have it (takes a prescription!) so I asked the clerk what he
suggested. He said to go over to "the junk food aisle."
That's where all the Fancy Feast was.
"Junk" food makes me think more of dogs, too. Loving them doesn't mean
not knowing they are scavengers by nature.
LFS
2017-10-07 21:43:59 UTC
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Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?
One could get away with "the mountain views" around here.
Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let
anyone say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying
this means one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.
They was* unhappy with your rhetoric?
_____________________________________________
*ObCurrent hobby-horse: IMO the indefinite "they" should take a singular
verb.  It's almost always used as a plural (How is your one surviving
parent?  They are fine, thanks), probably on the model of the 'singular'
"you".  But that "you" is explicitly a plural, used at first in
deference and afterwards in courtesy, something like the royal "we".
Queen Victoria would not have said "we am not amused", because the point
was that she was too grand for the singular.
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We are a
grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant", which to me seems
to indicate more ignorance of biology than is possible under the
circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family pet.
Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the arrival of a baby
daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't talk of them
as though they were my children. Some people do - they sign cards etc
from their pet, just as they do from their spouse and children.
But do you sing to them?
"Every little breeze seems to whisper Bubba....."
We had a wonderful cat called Smokey who enjoyed being sung to,
especially if I sang "Are you lonesome tonight?" with which he would
join in.

The family pets always used to send birthday cards to the children when
they were young, signed with a pawprint.

We have never treated our pets as if they were children (they would have
been insulted) but they are family members.
--
Laura (emulate St George for email)
Mack A. Damia
2017-10-07 22:47:53 UTC
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Post by LFS
Post by Mack A. Damia
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?
One could get away with "the mountain views" around here.
Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let
anyone say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying
this means one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.
They was* unhappy with your rhetoric?
_____________________________________________
*ObCurrent hobby-horse: IMO the indefinite "they" should take a singular
verb.  It's almost always used as a plural (How is your one surviving
parent?  They are fine, thanks), probably on the model of the 'singular'
"you".  But that "you" is explicitly a plural, used at first in
deference and afterwards in courtesy, something like the royal "we".
Queen Victoria would not have said "we am not amused", because the point
was that she was too grand for the singular.
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We are a
grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant", which to me seems
to indicate more ignorance of biology than is possible under the
circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family pet.
Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the arrival of a baby
daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't talk of them
as though they were my children. Some people do - they sign cards etc
from their pet, just as they do from their spouse and children.
But do you sing to them?
"Every little breeze seems to whisper Bubba....."
We had a wonderful cat called Smokey who enjoyed being sung to,
especially if I sang "Are you lonesome tonight?" with which he would
join in.
The family pets always used to send birthday cards to the children when
they were young, signed with a pawprint.
We have never treated our pets as if they were children (they would have
been insulted) but they are family members.
My mother had a cat, a gray, smoky longhair back in the 1990s and a
few years beyond; the cat came from a North Carolina farm and may have
had some feral in her because she was quite timid and standoffish .
Her name was Dixie.

Dixie wouldn't come to anybody. I moved to Mexico in year 2000 and
made several trips back to Pennsylvania to pick up more of my
belongings and also to visit. I always have sung to pets; I usually
make up my own words.

I was in the large recliner one day, and I began to sing the
Stylistics song .....

"Today I saw somebody who looked just like you,
She meowed like you do, I thought it was you.
As she turned the corner I called out 'Dixie'
I felt so ashamed when it wasn't you, wasn't you"

"You are everything
And everything is you
Oh, you are everything
And everything is you
Oh, you are everything
And everything is you"

Suddenly, she jumped up, laid on my chest and began to purr loudly.

From then on during subsequent visits, whenever I would sing the
song, up she would come. I was the only one, too. She wouldn't jump
up for my mum or anybody else.
Peter Moylan
2017-10-08 10:44:05 UTC
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Post by LFS
We had a wonderful cat called Smokey who enjoyed being sung to,
especially if I sang "Are you lonesome tonight?" with which he would
join in.
Whenever I practice guitar, one of the cats (Sybil) comes to sit at my
feet and listen to the music. She goes away when I put down the guitar.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Lewis
2017-10-07 19:57:54 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?
One could get away with "the mountain views" around here.
Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let
anyone say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying
this means one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.
They was* unhappy with your rhetoric?
_____________________________________________
*ObCurrent hobby-horse: IMO the indefinite "they" should take a singular
verb.  It's almost always used as a plural (How is your one surviving
parent?  They are fine, thanks), probably on the model of the 'singular'
"you".  But that "you" is explicitly a plural, used at first in
deference and afterwards in courtesy, something like the royal "we".
Queen Victoria would not have said "we am not amused", because the point
was that she was too grand for the singular.
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We are a
grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant", which to me seems
to indicate more ignorance of biology than is possible under the
circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family pet.
Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the arrival of a baby
daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't talk of them
as though they were my children. Some people do - they sign cards etc
from their pet, just as they do from their spouse and children.
I find that behavior extremely odd, a bit disturbing, and somewhat
insulting to children.
--
Amazingly Beautiful Creatures Dancing Excites the Forest Glade, in my
Heart how I do Jump like the Kudo Listen to the Music so Nice the Organ
Plays. Quietly Rests the Sleepy Tiger Under the Vine tree at the Water's
side and X marks the spot 'neath the Yellow moon where the Zulu king and
I did hide.
Janet
2017-10-07 20:47:05 UTC
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Post by Lewis
Post by Cheryl
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?
One could get away with "the mountain views" around here.
Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let
anyone say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying
this means one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.
They was* unhappy with your rhetoric?
_____________________________________________
*ObCurrent hobby-horse: IMO the indefinite "they" should take a singular
verb.  It's almost always used as a plural (How is your one surviving
parent?  They are fine, thanks), probably on the model of the 'singular'
"you".  But that "you" is explicitly a plural, used at first in
deference and afterwards in courtesy, something like the royal "we".
Queen Victoria would not have said "we am not amused", because the point
was that she was too grand for the singular.
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We are a
grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant", which to me seems
to indicate more ignorance of biology than is possible under the
circumstances.
I wonder whether that "we" ever includes a much-loved family pet.
Eventually, "Florence, Freddie and Fido" announce the arrival of a baby
daughter". ??
I wouldn't be surprised. I am fond of my pets, but I don't talk of them
as though they were my children. Some people do - they sign cards etc
from their pet, just as they do from their spouse and children.
I find that behavior extremely odd, a bit disturbing, and somewhat
insulting to children.
Sounds like you've never had your children phone home and ask you to
hold the phone to the dog's ear so they can talk to her.

Janet.
Jerry Friedman
2017-10-08 16:04:24 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by Lewis
Post by Cheryl
I am fond of my pets, but I don't talk of them
as though they were my children. Some people do - they sign cards etc
from their pet, just as they do from their spouse and children.
I find that behavior extremely odd, a bit disturbing, and somewhat
insulting to children.
Sounds like you've never had your children phone home and ask you to
hold the phone to the dog's ear so they can talk to her.
I'm pretty sure that never happened to my parents. I wonder whether
it's happened to my sister, who's especially fond of animals and has
brought up her children to be.
--
Jerry Friedman
CDB
2017-10-07 17:10:32 UTC
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Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your
apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one
would say or write, Shirley?
One could get away with "the mountain views" around here.
Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never
let anyone say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to
saying this means one is not sure. In what I have written
above, I am sure.
They was* unhappy with your rhetoric?
_____________________________________________ *ObCurrent
hobby-horse: IMO the indefinite "they" should take a singular
verb. It's almost always used as a plural (How is your one
surviving parent? They are fine, thanks), probably on the model
of the 'singular' "you". But that "you" is explicitly a plural,
used at first in deference and afterwards in courtesy, something
like the royal "we". Queen Victoria would not have said "we am
not amused", because the point was that she was too grand for the
singular.
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We are a
grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant", which to me
seems to indicate more ignorance of biology than is possible under
the circumstances.
I know it's intended to indicate the pleasure of both parents with
upcoming event, but it still sounds odd to me.
"We're expecting" would work, though.
Janet
2017-10-07 18:24:02 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your
apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one
would say or write, Shirley?
One could get away with "the mountain views" around here.
Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never
let anyone say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to
saying this means one is not sure. In what I have written
above, I am sure.
They was* unhappy with your rhetoric?
_____________________________________________ *ObCurrent
hobby-horse: IMO the indefinite "they" should take a singular
verb. It's almost always used as a plural (How is your one
surviving parent? They are fine, thanks), probably on the model
of the 'singular' "you". But that "you" is explicitly a plural,
used at first in deference and afterwards in courtesy, something
like the royal "we". Queen Victoria would not have said "we am
not amused", because the point was that she was too grand for the
singular.
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We are a
grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant", which to me
seems to indicate more ignorance of biology than is possible under
the circumstances.
I know it's intended to indicate the pleasure of both parents with
upcoming event, but it still sounds odd to me.
"We're expecting" would work, though.
"we're having a baby"... announced by son.
"We've lost the baby" .. announced by another son.

Janet.
Peter Young
2017-10-07 18:49:40 UTC
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Post by Janet
Post by CDB
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your
apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one
would say or write, Shirley?
One could get away with "the mountain views" around here.
Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never
let anyone say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to
saying this means one is not sure. In what I have written
above, I am sure.
They was* unhappy with your rhetoric?
_____________________________________________ *ObCurrent
hobby-horse: IMO the indefinite "they" should take a singular
verb. It's almost always used as a plural (How is your one
surviving parent? They are fine, thanks), probably on the model
of the 'singular' "you". But that "you" is explicitly a plural,
used at first in deference and afterwards in courtesy, something
like the royal "we". Queen Victoria would not have said "we am
not amused", because the point was that she was too grand for the
singular.
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We are a
grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant", which to me
seems to indicate more ignorance of biology than is possible under
the circumstances.
I know it's intended to indicate the pleasure of both parents with
upcoming event, but it still sounds odd to me.
"We're expecting" would work, though.
"we're having a baby"... announced by son.
"We've lost the baby" .. announced by another son.
OT: One of my former colleagues, who now sadly has Motor Neurone
Disease (but is beating the odds) had two children five years apart.
During the second pregnancy, Eleanor, the elder, was desperate to have
a sister. One day, she said to her Mother, "Mummy, if it's a boy ...
they can do a little operation, can't they?". I'm happy to say that
she was in the end delighted by her brother Ian.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Pt)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
Cheryl
2017-10-07 21:42:51 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Janet
Post by CDB
Post by Cheryl
Post by GordonD
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your
apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one
would say or write, Shirley?
One could get away with "the mountain views" around here.
Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never
let anyone say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to
saying this means one is not sure. In what I have written
above, I am sure.
They was* unhappy with your rhetoric?
_____________________________________________ *ObCurrent
hobby-horse: IMO the indefinite "they" should take a singular
verb. It's almost always used as a plural (How is your one
surviving parent? They are fine, thanks), probably on the model
of the 'singular' "you". But that "you" is explicitly a plural,
used at first in deference and afterwards in courtesy, something
like the royal "we". Queen Victoria would not have said "we am
not amused", because the point was that she was too grand for the
singular.
Margaret Thatcher was widely mocked for announcing "We are a
grandmother" when her son Mark's wife gave birth.
A lot of young couples seem to say "we are pregnant", which to me
seems to indicate more ignorance of biology than is possible under
the circumstances.
I know it's intended to indicate the pleasure of both parents with
upcoming event, but it still sounds odd to me.
"We're expecting" would work, though.
"we're having a baby"... announced by son.
"We've lost the baby" .. announced by another son.
OT: One of my former colleagues, who now sadly has Motor Neurone
Disease (but is beating the odds) had two children five years apart.
During the second pregnancy, Eleanor, the elder, was desperate to have
a sister. One day, she said to her Mother, "Mummy, if it's a boy ...
they can do a little operation, can't they?". I'm happy to say that
she was in the end delighted by her brother Ian.
I wanted my mother to have twins. As I pointed out to her, they were in
the family (I had twin aunts). For some reason, she wasn't thrilled with
the idea, but as things worked out, she only had one baby at a time.
--
Cheryl
b***@shaw.ca
2017-10-06 21:51:21 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your
apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?
Or even "The mountain views are stunning."

bill
Dingbat
2017-10-07 05:25:57 UTC
Reply
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your
apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let anyone
say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying this means
one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.
Does 'surely you jest' mean 'You must be joking' or 'I have a sinking
feeling that you're serious' or either?
Richard Yates
2017-10-07 12:56:29 UTC
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On Fri, 6 Oct 2017 22:25:57 -0700 (PDT), Dingbat
Post by Dingbat
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your
apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let anyone
say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying this means
one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.
Does 'surely you jest' mean 'You must be joking' or 'I have a sinking
feeling that you're serious' or either?
Lots of sentence starters have this quality. Consider:
"To be perfectly honest..."
"To tell you the truth..."
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2017-10-07 09:27:34 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your
apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?
A rule of English that I have difficulty convincing French people of is
that the rule for forming the plural of an adjective, or a noun acting
as an adjective, is as simple a rule as one can imagine: it is
invariant (with extremely few exceptions, like "sports jacket")
Post by Peter Young
Peter.
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let anyone
say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying this means
one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.
I think your biology teacher* was wrong. "Surely" can mean you are
sure, but more often it introduces a question expecting the answer yes,
like Latin "nonne". In the Latin grammar that we had (Kennedy's Shorter
Latin Primer) there was a section headed "Nonne and Num", in which it
said that the English equivalents were "Surely ... ?" and "Surely ...
not ... ?

On one of the occasions when Lord Peter proposed to Harriet he sent a
telegram in Latin, starting with "Num". This was probably in Gaudy
Night, but that's a book I don't have. Dorothy L. Sayers said "as
everybody knows, 'num' introduces a question expecting the answer no".
However, she realized that not everybody _would_ know, or she wouldn't
have felt the need to explain.

*My own biology teacher was a highly cultivated man, who had read every
English novel anyone had heard of. He was good looking but unmarried,
with all that that implies.
--
athel
Dingbat
2017-10-07 22:27:45 UTC
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Post by Peter Young
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let anyone
say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying this means
one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.
"Surely" can mean you are sure, but more often it introduces a question
expecting the answer yes, like Latin "nonne". In the Latin grammar that
we had (Kennedy's Shorter Latin Primer) there was a section headed
"Nonne and Num", in which it said that the English equivalents were
"Surely ... ?" and "Surely not ... ?
On one of the occasions when Lord Peter proposed to Harriet he sent a
telegram in Latin, starting with "Num". This was probably in Gaudy
Night, but that's a book I don't have. Dorothy L. Sayers said "as
everybody knows, 'num' introduces a question expecting the answer no".
However, she realized that not everybody _would_ know, or she wouldn't
have felt the need to explain.
Perhaps Peter Wimsey was the kind of man who'd propose in English by saying,
"Surely you don't want to marry me?" I remember a joke where a young man
nervously approaches a CEO asking, "You don't need any insurance, do you?"
The executive bought some to build the salesman's confidence and said, "You
need a strategy for each kind of customer," The salesman said, "I just used
my strategy for selling insurance to CEOs."

If I remember my (late) former landlady right, Peter Wimsey proposed to
Harriet Vane many times only to be turned down every time, and by the
time she was ready to accept, he had become convinced of the futility of
continuing to propose, so she had to prompt him to propose again.
Mark Brader
2017-10-08 04:48:32 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
If I remember my (late) former landlady right, Peter Wimsey proposed to
Harriet Vane many times only to be turned down every time, and by the
time she was ready to accept, he had become convinced of the futility of
continuing to propose, so she had to prompt him to propose again.
Not so. After the mystery is resolved, he says something to the following
effect:

"You may have noticed that I have not not once proposed to you
while we have been here (at Oxford). This is because your answer,
when I propose to you HERE, will your answer be for all time."

And then he asks her one final time.

(This from memory, but I'm sure. The scene is at the end of "Gaudy Night".)
--
Mark Brader "Hacking for 8 years gives a guy a memory.
Toronto If you was with a woman -- I'd've noticed."
***@vex.net PHANTOM LADY

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Jerry Friedman
2017-10-08 19:01:39 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Dingbat
If I remember my (late) former landlady right, Peter Wimsey proposed to
Harriet Vane many times only to be turned down every time, and by the
time she was ready to accept, he had become convinced of the futility of
continuing to propose, so she had to prompt him to propose again.
Not so. After the mystery is resolved, he says something to the following
"You may have noticed that I have not not once proposed to you
while we have been here (at Oxford). This is because your answer,
when I propose to you HERE, will your answer be for all time."
And then he asks her one final time.
(This from memory, but I'm sure. The scene is at the end of "Gaudy Night".)
Yes. Of course, he still has to say something in Latin.

https://books.google.com/books?id=pcLTJYnKDdEC&pg=PT660
--
Jerry Friedman
Mark Brader
2017-10-08 21:26:34 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Mark Brader
(This from memory, but I'm sure. The scene is at the end of "Gaudy Night".)
Yes. Of course, he still has to say something in Latin.
https://books.google.com/books?id=pcLTJYnKDdEC&pg=PT660
Hmph. *I'm* not allowed to see any pages from that edition, and in
the one edition I did find to be previewable, none of the searches
I tried found the relevant scene.
--
Mark Brader "Computers get paid to extract relevant
Toronto information from files; people should not
***@vex.net have to do such mundane tasks." -- Ian Darwin
Jerry Friedman
2017-10-09 13:49:29 UTC
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Post by Mark Brader
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Mark Brader
(This from memory, but I'm sure. The scene is at the end of "Gaudy Night".)
Yes. Of course, he still has to say something in Latin.
https://books.google.com/books?id=pcLTJYnKDdEC&pg=PT660
Hmph. *I'm* not allowed to see any pages from that edition, and in
the one edition I did find to be previewable, none of the searches
I tried found the relevant scene.
Well, /I/ didn't tell you to live in a country with only 36 million people.

Try searching for "the last difficult breach", or *looks around, whispers*

https://unotices.com/book.php?id=61403&page=112
--
Jerry Friedman
Mark Brader
2017-10-10 00:15:05 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Mark Brader
Hmph. *I'm* not allowed to see any pages from that edition, and in
the one edition I did find to be previewable, none of the searches
I tried found the relevant scene.
Well, /I/ didn't tell you to live in a country with only 36 million people.
Oh, is *that* what happened!?
Post by Jerry Friedman
Try searching for "the last difficult breach",
Again, not found in the edition I was allowed to preview. Presumably the
OCR did not go as well as it should have.
Post by Jerry Friedman
or *looks around, whispers*
(Quickly closes door.)

So I had the essence of it. I was sure I had.
--
Mark Brader | "Of course, the most important part of making the
Toronto | proposal something special for both of you is
***@vex.net | addressing it to the right person." --Mara Chibnik

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Lewis
2017-10-08 03:17:27 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Peter Young
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your
apostrophe?
Nowhere. "The views of the mountains are stunning" is what one would
say or write, Shirley?
A rule of English that I have difficulty convincing French people of is
that the rule for forming the plural of an adjective, or a noun acting
as an adjective, is as simple a rule as one can imagine: it is
invariant (with extremely few exceptions, like "sports jacket")
Post by Peter Young
Peter.
ObAUE: My biology teacher when I was aged 13-18 would never let anyone
say "Surely such and such is ..." as the very act to saying this means
one is not sure. In what I have written above, I am sure.
I think your biology teacher* was wrong.
Absolutely, entirely, unquestionably.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
"Surely" can mean you are sure, but more often it introduces a
question expecting the answer yes,
Exactly so.
--
Minds are like parachutes, they only work when they are open.
Peter T. Daniels
2017-10-06 18:46:00 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your
apostrophe?
Nowhere.

The expression is "The mountain views are stunning."
CDB
2017-10-06 21:01:14 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
You don't need to accompany or replace the "s" with an apostrophe, since
it shouldn't be there in the first place.
Richard Yates
2017-10-06 22:44:26 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
You don't need to accompany or replace the "s" with an apostrophe, since
it shouldn't be there in the first place.
Depends. If what is meant is "the views from the top of the mountain"
then apostrophe+s is needed.

If it is "the view of the mountains" then "mountain views" is normal
(and there "mountain" is a mass noun not needing an "s".
Peter Moylan
2017-10-07 01:26:38 UTC
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Post by Richard Yates
Post by CDB
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
You don't need to accompany or replace the "s" with an apostrophe, since
it shouldn't be there in the first place.
Depends. If what is meant is "the views from the top of the mountain"
then apostrophe+s is needed.
If it is "the view of the mountains" then "mountain views" is normal
(and there "mountain" is a mass noun not needing an "s".
The mountain's view is that it should be left in peace.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
David Kleinecke
2017-10-07 03:46:21 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Richard Yates
Post by CDB
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
You don't need to accompany or replace the "s" with an apostrophe, since
it shouldn't be there in the first place.
Depends. If what is meant is "the views from the top of the mountain"
then apostrophe+s is needed.
If it is "the view of the mountains" then "mountain views" is normal
(and there "mountain" is a mass noun not needing an "s".
The mountain's view is that it should be left in peace.
Muhammad can't come?
Whiskers
2017-10-07 12:38:10 UTC
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Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Richard Yates
Post by CDB
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
You don't need to accompany or replace the "s" with an apostrophe, since
it shouldn't be there in the first place.
Depends. If what is meant is "the views from the top of the mountain"
then apostrophe+s is needed.
If it is "the view of the mountains" then "mountain views" is normal
(and there "mountain" is a mass noun not needing an "s".
The mountain's view is that it should be left in peace.
Muhammad can't come?
Has anyone asked the mountain?
--
-- ^^^^^^^^^^
-- Whiskers
-- ~~~~~~~~~~
Lewis
2017-10-07 19:55:47 UTC
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Post by Whiskers
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Richard Yates
Post by CDB
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
You don't need to accompany or replace the "s" with an apostrophe, since
it shouldn't be there in the first place.
Depends. If what is meant is "the views from the top of the mountain"
then apostrophe+s is needed.
If it is "the view of the mountains" then "mountain views" is normal
(and there "mountain" is a mass noun not needing an "s".
The mountain's view is that it should be left in peace.
Muhammad can't come?
Has anyone asked the mountain?
<Loading Image...>

but he doesn't talk much anymore.
--
There are many reasons for being friends with someone. The fact that
he's pointing a deadly weapon at you is among the top four. --The Last
Continent
CDB
2017-10-07 17:10:24 UTC
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Post by Richard Yates
Post by CDB
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
You don't need to accompany or replace the "s" with an apostrophe,
since it shouldn't be there in the first place.
Depends. If what is meant is "the views from the top of the
mountain" then apostrophe+s is needed.
If it is "the view of the mountains" then "mountain views" is normal
(and there "mountain" is a mass noun not needing an "s".
True, except for the last bit, IMO: "mountain" is a noun in attributive
use and, as you say, doesn't require the plural marker. Interesting
idea, though. Must think about it.

But you need to whomp up a suitable context in which you
have already mentioned a specific mountain and are referring to it
again. I think "mountain's" is unsuited to the general case.
Harrison Hill
2017-10-08 17:41:00 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Richard Yates
Post by CDB
Post by Harrison Hill
One for CDB: "The mountains views are stunning!"
You have mountains in Canada. Where do you put your apostrophe?
You don't need to accompany or replace the "s" with an apostrophe,
since it shouldn't be there in the first place.
Depends. If what is meant is "the views from the top of the
mountain" then apostrophe+s is needed.
If it is "the view of the mountains" then "mountain views" is normal
(and there "mountain" is a mass noun not needing an "s".
True, except for the last bit, IMO: "mountain" is a noun in attributive
use and, as you say, doesn't require the plural marker. Interesting
idea, though. Must think about it.
It doesn't *require* the plural marker; but you change the scope
when you introduce an ambiguous marker.
Post by CDB
But you need to whomp up a suitable context in which you
have already mentioned a specific mountain and are referring to it
again. I think "mountain's" is unsuited to the general case.
Okay: where does the apostrophe go in "borders disputes"?

A "border dispute" is a dispute along or about "a border";
but these are "borders disputes" plural. Mountain ranges nations
borders disputes, let's say :)
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