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Buy Registered Certificates Nclex-RN | Nebosh | PTE | Celpip |Toefl (whatsapp: +40701109757)
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Naritar Reyes
2021-03-28 03:43:46 UTC
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Very informative post! please keep sharing such kind of post! https://www.travellingabroad.net/buy-nclex-certificate/
We are a very well organized team & our mission is to assist people get either ; CERTIFICATE, NEBOSH, NCLEX, TOEFL ,GRE, GMAT, CAE, TOEIC, TELC, KET, FCE, CPE, DELF/DALF, CLEP/DELE, DILI, CIPLE,.. we have the experience and connections to issue valid documents. so if you want to buy Nclex-RN certificate online then call us on whatsapp +407 011 09 757
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Peter Moylan
2021-03-28 05:25:25 UTC
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Post by Naritar Reyes
Very informative post! please keep sharing such kind of post!
https://www.travellingabroad.net/buy-nclex-certificate/ We are a
very well organized team & our mission is to assist people get either
; CERTIFICATE, NEBOSH, NCLEX, TOEFL ,GRE, GMAT, CAE, TOEIC, TELC,
KET, FCE, CPE, DELF/DALF, CLEP/DELE, DILI, CIPLE,.. we have the
experience and connections to issue valid documents. so if you want
to buy Nclex-RN certificate online then call us on whatsapp +407 011
09 757 Buy Nebosh certificate Online Buy NCLEX Certificate
Is there any point in reporting this to the police? The poster has been
careful not to mention passports or driver's licences, but I don't
actually know whether it's illegal in the US to sell fake test
certificates. Any, anyway, the web site does mention passports and
similar documents, although it doesn't explicitly say they are forgeries.

This sort of thing can be hard to pursue because of international
scatter. The ISP is American, but the contact address is in England and
the phone number is in Romania.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
occam
2021-03-28 07:51:00 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Naritar Reyes
Very informative post! please keep sharing such kind of post!
https://www.travellingabroad.net/buy-nclex-certificate/ We are a
very well organized team & our mission is to assist people get either
; CERTIFICATE, NEBOSH, NCLEX, TOEFL ,GRE, GMAT, CAE, TOEIC, TELC,
KET, FCE, CPE, DELF/DALF, CLEP/DELE, DILI, CIPLE,.. we have the
experience and connections to issue valid documents. so if you want
to buy Nclex-RN certificate online then call us on whatsapp +407 011
09 757 Buy Nebosh certificate Online Buy NCLEX Certificate
Is there any point in reporting this to the police? The poster has been
careful not to mention passports or driver's licences, but I don't
actually know whether it's illegal in the US to sell fake test
certificates.
They issue fake presidents in that country, don't they?

I recall seeing ads like this in print (in newspapers) in the '90s.
Mail-order college degrees were a thing. I'm sure they are bogus but
could be considered 'legal' if the issuing authority is registered as an
educational establishment in the US, in the way that some groups are
registered as religions, to avoid paying taxes.

I agree tracing such scams has become more difficult with the advent of
the internet. If you follow through and make a payment, however, that
money can be traced to a bank/place/account name? Unless payment is only
via Bitcoin.
Peter Moylan
2021-03-28 08:14:08 UTC
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Post by occam
I agree tracing such scams has become more difficult with the advent of
the internet. If you follow through and make a payment, however, that
money can be traced to a bank/place/account name? Unless payment is only
via Bitcoin.
Just out of interest: are there many non-criminals using Bitcoin?
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
occam
2021-03-28 08:28:54 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
I agree tracing such scams has become more difficult with the advent of
the internet. If you follow through and make a payment, however, that
money can be traced to a bank/place/account name? Unless payment is only
via Bitcoin.
Just out of interest: are there many non-criminals using Bitcoin?
I believe there are. Furthermore, it is on the cusp of becoming accepted
as legal currency in some countries.

Of interest to you:

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_bitcoin_by_country_or_territory#Australasia


More generally:
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_bitcoin_by_country_or_territory
occam
2021-03-28 08:33:36 UTC
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Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
I agree tracing such scams has become more difficult with the advent of
the internet. If you follow through and make a payment, however, that
money can be traced to a bank/place/account name? Unless payment is only
via Bitcoin.
Just out of interest: are there many non-criminals using Bitcoin?
I believe there are. Furthermore, it is on the cusp of becoming accepted
as legal currency in some countries.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_bitcoin_by_country_or_territory#Australasia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_bitcoin_by_country_or_territory
Also:

https://www.cnbc.com/2021/02/12/bitcoin-banks-closer-accepting-cryptocurrency-asset-class.html
Peter Moylan
2021-03-28 10:14:52 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
I agree tracing such scams has become more difficult with the
advent of the internet. If you follow through and make a payment,
however, that money can be traced to a bank/place/account name?
Unless payment is only via Bitcoin.
Just out of interest: are there many non-criminals using Bitcoin?
I believe there are. Furthermore, it is on the cusp of becoming
accepted as legal currency in some countries.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_bitcoin_by_country_or_territory#Australasia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_bitcoin_by_country_or_territory
I
was aware that bitcoin transactions are legal in Australia, and it
bothers me. One very troublesome use is in ransomware attacks, and of
course it's known that bitcoin is used in money laundering.

The philosophy that transactions should be anonymous sounds interesting
from a privacy point of view, but in practice it has become too
criminal-friendly.

I strongly believe that

(a) implementers of any digital currency should be required to develop a
mechanism whereby the recipient of a transaction can be identified if
there are sufficient grounds, e.g. on a complaint from a ransomware
victim, and that there should be a mechanism to reverse the transaction
on proof that it was part of a criminal operation.

(b) if (a) is claimed to be impossible, then all transactions in that
currency should be declared illegal.

Of course it is hard to stop a black market underground from developing
- in fact, it's probably already in existence - but if a sufficient
number of countries banned bitcoin use then that would put pressure on
the others to join in; and a worldwide ban would then make it hard to
turn bitcoin into tangible assets.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
occam
2021-03-28 10:58:05 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
I agree tracing such scams has become more difficult with the
advent of the internet. If you follow through and make a payment,
however, that money can be traced to a bank/place/account name?
Unless payment is only via Bitcoin.
Just out of interest: are there many non-criminals using Bitcoin?
I believe there are. Furthermore, it is on the cusp of becoming
accepted as legal currency in some countries.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_bitcoin_by_country_or_territory#Australasia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_bitcoin_by_country_or_territory
I
was aware that bitcoin transactions are legal in Australia, and it
bothers me. One very troublesome use is in ransomware attacks, and of
course it's known that bitcoin is used in money laundering.
The philosophy that transactions should be anonymous sounds interesting
from a privacy point of view, but in practice it has become too
criminal-friendly.
A bit like cash? You realise that cash transactions are also legal and
untraceable?
Post by Peter Moylan
I strongly believe that
(a) implementers of any digital currency should be required to develop a
mechanism whereby the recipient of a transaction can be identified if
there are sufficient grounds, e.g. on a complaint from a ransomware
victim, and that there should be a mechanism to reverse the transaction
on proof that it was part of a criminal operation.
(b) if (a) is claimed to be impossible, then all transactions in that
currency should be declared illegal.
Of course it is hard to stop a black market underground from developing
- in fact, it's probably already in existence - but if a sufficient
number of countries banned bitcoin use then that would put pressure on
the others to join in; and a worldwide ban would then make it hard to
turn bitcoin into tangible assets.
The other perspective is, there are huge benefits to be had for the
first country (and therefore first banks) to adopt Bitcoin as legal
currency. The rush of money into that country from outside individuals
and corporations (e.g. Elon Musk), would pressure other banks to adopt
the currency.

The unexpected twist in this saga appears to be the cost of maintaining
a cryptocurrency continuing to operate. The cost of mining and
transactions is already quite high, and is becoming higher. The
maintenance of the 'blockchain' information (a kind of overhead) is
increasing with every transaction. The currency relies on many, many
servers worldwide to maintain its distributed records and the integrity
of the currency. This ever increasing expense could eventually render
the concept unviable.
Ross Clark
2021-03-28 20:44:11 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
I agree tracing such scams has become more difficult with the
advent of the internet. If you follow through and make a payment,
however, that money can be traced to a bank/place/account name?
Unless payment is only via Bitcoin.
Just out of interest: are there many non-criminals using Bitcoin?
I believe there are. Furthermore, it is on the cusp of becoming
accepted as legal currency in some countries.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_bitcoin_by_country_or_territory#Australasia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_bitcoin_by_country_or_territory
I
was aware that bitcoin transactions are legal in Australia, and it
bothers me. One very troublesome use is in ransomware attacks, and of
course it's known that bitcoin is used in money laundering.
The philosophy that transactions should be anonymous sounds interesting
from a privacy point of view, but in practice it has become too
criminal-friendly.
A bit like cash? You realise that cash transactions are also legal and
untraceable?
Post by Peter Moylan
I strongly believe that
(a) implementers of any digital currency should be required to develop a
mechanism whereby the recipient of a transaction can be identified if
there are sufficient grounds, e.g. on a complaint from a ransomware
victim, and that there should be a mechanism to reverse the transaction
on proof that it was part of a criminal operation.
(b) if (a) is claimed to be impossible, then all transactions in that
currency should be declared illegal.
Of course it is hard to stop a black market underground from developing
- in fact, it's probably already in existence - but if a sufficient
number of countries banned bitcoin use then that would put pressure on
the others to join in; and a worldwide ban would then make it hard to
turn bitcoin into tangible assets.
The other perspective is, there are huge benefits to be had for the
first country (and therefore first banks) to adopt Bitcoin as legal
currency. The rush of money into that country from outside individuals
and corporations (e.g. Elon Musk), would pressure other banks to adopt
the currency.
So this idea is why Tuvalu wants to be the first Bitcoin country? Oh
great, another small, poor Pacific island country suckered by
multinational moneyfuckers.
Post by occam
The unexpected twist in this saga appears to be the cost of maintaining
a cryptocurrency continuing to operate. The cost of mining and
transactions is already quite high, and is becoming higher. The
maintenance of the 'blockchain' information (a kind of overhead) is
increasing with every transaction. The currency relies on many, many
servers worldwide to maintain its distributed records and the integrity
of the currency. This ever increasing expense could eventually render
the concept unviable.
Peter Moylan
2021-03-29 00:44:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by occam
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
I agree tracing such scams has become more difficult with the
advent of the internet. If you follow through and make a payment,
however, that money can be traced to a bank/place/account name?
Unless payment is only via Bitcoin.
Just out of interest: are there many non-criminals using Bitcoin?
I believe there are. Furthermore, it is on the cusp of becoming
accepted as legal currency in some countries.
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_bitcoin_by_country_or_territory#Australasia
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Legality_of_bitcoin_by_country_or_territory
I
was aware that bitcoin transactions are legal in Australia, and it
bothers me. One very troublesome use is in ransomware attacks, and of
course it's known that bitcoin is used in money laundering.
The philosophy that transactions should be anonymous sounds interesting
from a privacy point of view, but in practice it has become too
criminal-friendly.
A bit like cash? You realise that cash transactions are also legal and
untraceable?
Post by Peter Moylan
I strongly believe that
(a) implementers of any digital currency should be required to develop a
mechanism whereby the recipient of a transaction can be identified if
there are sufficient grounds, e.g. on a complaint from a ransomware
victim, and that there should be a mechanism to reverse the transaction
on proof that it was part of a criminal operation.
(b) if (a) is claimed to be impossible, then all transactions in that
currency should be declared illegal.
Of course it is hard to stop a black market underground from developing
- in fact, it's probably already in existence - but if a sufficient
number of countries banned bitcoin use then that would put pressure on
the others to join in; and a worldwide ban would then make it hard to
turn bitcoin into tangible assets.
The other perspective is, there are huge benefits to be had for the
first country (and therefore first banks) to adopt Bitcoin as legal
currency. The rush of money into that country from outside individuals
and corporations (e.g. Elon Musk), would pressure other banks to adopt
the currency.
The unexpected twist in this saga appears to be the cost of maintaining
a cryptocurrency continuing to operate. The cost of mining and
transactions is already quite high, and is becoming higher. The
maintenance of the 'blockchain' information (a kind of overhead) is
increasing with every transaction. The currency relies on many, many
servers worldwide to maintain its distributed records and the integrity
of the currency. This ever increasing expense could eventually render
the concept unviable.
The inventor(s) of bitcoin have apparently taken eir (very large) profit
and dropped out of sight. No doubt this was based on a conservative
estimate of when the bubble was likely to burst.

If I had been an early adopter, I'd be getting out about now.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
musika
2021-03-29 01:57:23 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
The inventor(s) of bitcoin have apparently taken eir (very large)
profit and dropped out of sight. No doubt this was based on a
conservative estimate of when the bubble was likely to burst.
If I had been an early adopter, I'd be getting out about now.
Here's a chap who thought the same.

<https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-55658942>
--
Ray
UK
Kerr-Mudd,John
2021-03-29 10:14:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by musika
Post by Peter Moylan
The inventor(s) of bitcoin have apparently taken eir (very large)
profit and dropped out of sight. No doubt this was based on a
conservative estimate of when the bubble was likely to burst.
If I had been an early adopter, I'd be getting out about now.
Here's a chap who thought the same.
<https://www.bbc.co.uk/news/uk-wales-55658942>
It was £4m at the start; he must be getting really uptight by now.
(cuurent est £210m)
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Lewis
2021-03-28 12:38:47 UTC
Reply
Permalink
I was aware that bitcoin transactions are legal in Australia, and it
bothers me. One very troublesome use is in ransomware attacks, and of
course it's known that bitcoin is used in money laundering.
The philosophy that transactions should be anonymous sounds interesting
from a privacy point of view, but in practice it has become too
criminal-friendly.
Everything you said above is true of cash, and are arguments made in
favor of abolishing cash.
--
Angie, Angie, when will those clouds all disappear? Angie, Angie,
where will it lead us from here? With no lovin' in our soul and
no money in our coats You can't say we're satisfied But Angie,
Angie--You can't say we never tried
Lewis
2021-03-28 12:36:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
I agree tracing such scams has become more difficult with the advent of
the internet. If you follow through and make a payment, however, that
money can be traced to a bank/place/account name? Unless payment is only
via Bitcoin.
Just out of interest: are there many non-criminals using Bitcoin?
Yes.
--
I have a cunning plan.
Does it involve a turnip?
Funnily enough, it does!
Ross Clark
2021-03-28 20:59:58 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by occam
I agree tracing such scams has become more difficult with the advent of
the internet. If you follow through and make a payment, however, that
money can be traced to a bank/place/account name? Unless payment is only
via Bitcoin.
Just out of interest: are there many non-criminals using Bitcoin?
Well, the young Australian who became New Zealand's most successful mass
murderer was reported, in the aftermath, to have "made some money on
(from? with?) Bitcoin" to finance his move. I wondered at the time how
that would work? Presumably through the "mining" -- what a cruelly
ironic term for an activity that requires no more skill, hard work or
exposure to danger than sitting at your computer and pushing a few keys.
But it was legal. And he wasn't a criminal at the time.
Quinn C
2021-03-30 13:26:43 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Ross Clark
"mining" -- what a cruelly
ironic term for an activity that requires no more skill, hard work or
exposure to danger than sitting at your computer and pushing a few keys.
People who make a lot of money from traditional mining haven't done it
with physical labor or exposure to danger (beyond tax audits) for a
while now. If ever.
--
Somebody, your father or mine, should have told us that not many
people have ever died of love. But multitudes have perished, and
are perishing every hour [...] for the lack of it.
-- James Baldwin, Giovanni's Room
CDB
2021-03-28 13:15:49 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Naritar Reyes
Very informative post! please keep sharing such kind of post!
https://www.travellingabroad.net/buy-nclex-certificate/ We are a
very well organized team & our mission is to assist people get
either ; CERTIFICATE, NEBOSH, NCLEX, TOEFL ,GRE, GMAT, CAE, TOEIC,
TELC, KET, FCE, CPE, DELF/DALF, CLEP/DELE, DILI, CIPLE,.. we have
the experience and connections to issue valid documents. so if you
want to buy Nclex-RN certificate online then call us on whatsapp
+407 011 09 757 Buy Nebosh certificate Online Buy NCLEX
Certificate
Is there any point in reporting this to the police? The poster has
been careful not to mention passports or driver's licences, but I
don't actually know whether it's illegal in the US to sell fake test
certificates. Any, anyway, the web site does mention passports and
similar documents, although it doesn't explicitly say they are
forgeries.
This sort of thing can be hard to pursue because of international
scatter. The ISP is American, but the contact address is in England
and the phone number is in Romania.
Recently, people trying to get into Canada with forged certification of
Covid-free test results have been detained; some have been charged with
criminal offences.
Peter T. Daniels
2021-03-28 16:01:56 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[illegal stuff]
Post by Peter Moylan
Is there any point in reporting this to the police? The poster has been
careful not to mention passports or driver's licences, but I don't
actually know whether it's illegal in the US to sell fake test
certificates. Any, anyway, the web site does mention passports and
similar documents, although it doesn't explicitly say they are forgeries.
This sort of thing can be hard to pursue because of international
scatter. The ISP is American, but the contact address is in England and
the phone number is in Romania.
Just report it to your ISP.

Every message in GG comes with the opportunity to "Report Abuse,"
in several categories, and I always do. This one falls under "Promotion
of Regulated Goods or Services."
Peter Moylan
2021-03-29 00:50:26 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
[illegal stuff]
Post by Peter Moylan
Is there any point in reporting this to the police? The poster has
been careful not to mention passports or driver's licences, but I
don't actually know whether it's illegal in the US to sell fake
test certificates. Any, anyway, the web site does mention passports
and similar documents, although it doesn't explicitly say they are
forgeries.
This sort of thing can be hard to pursue because of international
scatter. The ISP is American, but the contact address is in England
and the phone number is in Romania.
Just report it to your ISP.
Every message in GG comes with the opportunity to "Report Abuse," in
several categories, and I always do. This one falls under "Promotion
of Regulated Goods or Services."
I'm not too worried about the spam factor, because it's moderately
small. I was thinking more of the benefit to police operations: if
Interpol made the effort to read the spam, it could lead to shutting
down some shady operations.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Sam Plusnet
2021-03-29 01:28:00 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Peter T. Daniels
[illegal stuff]
Post by Peter Moylan
Is there any point in reporting this to the police? The poster has
been careful not to mention passports or driver's licences, but I
don't actually know whether it's illegal in the US to sell fake
test certificates. Any, anyway, the web site does mention passports
and similar documents, although it doesn't explicitly say they are
forgeries.
This sort of thing can be hard to pursue because of international
scatter. The ISP is American, but the contact address is in England
and the phone number is in Romania.
Just report it to your ISP.
Every message in GG comes with the opportunity to "Report Abuse," in
several categories, and I always do. This one falls under "Promotion
of Regulated Goods or Services."
I'm not too worried about the spam factor, because it's moderately
small. I was thinking more of the benefit to police operations: if
Interpol made the effort to read the spam, it could lead to shutting
down some shady operations.
But each police authority is responsible for a specific geographic area.
Such schemes will always be 'someone else's problem'.
At the very least, a 'local' problem will always be first in the queue
when it comes the the allocation of resources.
--
Sam Plusnet
Wales, UK
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