Discussion:
who was extremely nervous
(too old to reply)
a***@gmail.com
2019-11-30 04:24:52 UTC
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1) There was John with me, who was extremely nervous.
2) There was John in the room, who was extremely nervous.

3) There was the colonel with me, who was quite angry.
4) There was the colonel in the room, who was extremely angry.

Are the above sentence grammatical?

Are there idiomatic?

Gratefully,
Navi
David Kleinecke
2019-11-30 05:04:32 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) There was John with me, who was extremely nervous.
2) There was John in the room, who was extremely nervous.
3) There was the colonel with me, who was quite angry.
4) There was the colonel in the room, who was extremely angry.
Are the above sentence grammatical?
Are there idiomatic?
One more time. Two sentences.
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) John was with me. He was extremely nervous.
2) John was in the room. He was extremely nervous.
3) The colonel was with me. He was quite angry.
4) The colonel was in the room. He was extremely angry.
1) John, who was extremely nervous, was with me,
etc.

Or
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) John, now/still extremely nervous, was with me,
etc.

No nervous or angry me or the colonel.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-11-30 09:52:11 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) There was John with me, who was extremely nervous.
2) There was John in the room, who was extremely nervous.
3) There was the colonel with me, who was quite angry.
4) There was the colonel in the room, who was extremely angry.
(Commenting before seeing what David has written)
Post by a***@gmail.com
Are the above sentence grammatical?
No. You can't use either "me" or "the room" as referent for "who".
Post by a***@gmail.com
Are there idiomatic?
No.
--
athel
a***@gmail.com
2019-11-30 10:03:23 UTC
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Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) There was John with me, who was extremely nervous.
2) There was John in the room, who was extremely nervous.
3) There was the colonel with me, who was quite angry.
4) There was the colonel in the room, who was extremely angry.
(Commenting before seeing what David has written)
Post by a***@gmail.com
Are the above sentence grammatical?
No. You can't use either "me" or "the room" as referent for "who".
Post by a***@gmail.com
Are there idiomatic?
No.
--
athel
Thank you both very much,

How about

5) He had his brother with him, who was a doctor.

I thought the first ones didn't work, but for some reason '5' just sounds fine
to me. Maybe it is just me. My apologies if that is the case. I was 'exploring'
this subject and thought I might have found an anomaly. But it might be in
my own brain. I really don't mean to get on your nerves.

Gratefully,
Navi
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-30 14:54:46 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
How about
5) He had his brother with him, who was a doctor.
As long as you understand that the brother is the doctor and "he" is not,
though I fear you think that "doctor" can be "he."
a***@gmail.com
2019-11-30 20:53:24 UTC
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Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by a***@gmail.com
How about
5) He had his brother with him, who was a doctor.
As long as you understand that the brother is the doctor and "he" is not,
though I fear you think that "doctor" can be "he."
Thank you all very much,

I don't think that is possible. The "doctor" can only be his brother, as far as
I can see. Maybe in the olden days that sentence could have the other meaning.
I don't know about that.

Gratefully,
Navi

Ken Blake
2019-11-30 16:00:56 UTC
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Post by a***@gmail.com
1) There was John with me, who was extremely nervous.
2) There was John in the room, who was extremely nervous.
3) There was the colonel with me, who was quite angry.
4) There was the colonel in the room, who was extremely angry.
Are the above sentence grammatical?
Are there idiomatic?
No and no. "Who was extremely bervous" should immediately follow "John,"
and "who was ...angry" should immediately follow "the colonel."


There was John, who was extremely nervous, in the room.

There was the colonel, who was quite angry, with me.
--
Ken
charles
2019-11-30 16:39:08 UTC
Permalink
Post by Ken Blake
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) There was John with me, who was extremely nervous.
2) There was John in the room, who was extremely nervous.
3) There was the colonel with me, who was quite angry.
4) There was the colonel in the room, who was extremely angry.
Are the above sentence grammatical?
Are there idiomatic?
No and no. "Who was extremely bervous" should immediately follow "John,"
and "who was ...angry" should immediately follow "the colonel."
There was John, who was extremely nervous, in the room.
There was the colonel, who was quite angry, with me.
was that Colonel Mustard?
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Peter Young
2019-11-30 19:28:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Ken Blake
Post by a***@gmail.com
1) There was John with me, who was extremely nervous.
2) There was John in the room, who was extremely nervous.
3) There was the colonel with me, who was quite angry.
4) There was the colonel in the room, who was extremely angry.
Are the above sentence grammatical?
Are there idiomatic?
No and no. "Who was extremely bervous" should immediately follow "John,"
and "who was ...angry" should immediately follow "the colonel."
There was John, who was extremely nervous, in the room.
There was the colonel, who was quite angry, with me.
was that Colonel Mustard?
It must'd been.

Peter.
--
Peter Young, (BrE, RP), Consultant Anaesthetist, 1975-2004.
(US equivalent: Certified Anesthesiologist) (AUE Hg)
Cheltenham and Gloucester, UK. Now happily retired.
http://pnyoung.orpheusweb.co.uk
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