Discussion:
Article dropping in colloquial English
(too old to reply)
Stefan Ram
2020-01-02 02:05:10 UTC
Permalink
I recently saw an article being dropped (omitted) by a
presumed native speakers of English in a situation where
the dropping of the article surprised me.

|How did Taka get all of that merch into the house?
|Dude is running his business out of Terrace House.

I assume this is colloquial, and standard speech would
require something like "This dude". However, colloquial
speech has its own rules, it's not like, "anything goes".

So, what would be the rule from colloquial speech used above
that allows an article to be dropped that should be there in
standard English? I.e., Under which circumstances is such a
dropping possible?

(To further explain the question: I assume the article
"the" in front of "house" above cannot be droppped -
even in colloquial speech. So there must be a rule about
when the article can be dropped.)
Mark Brader
2020-01-02 06:27:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
I recently saw an article being dropped (omitted) by a
presumed native speakers of English in a situation where
the dropping of the article surprised me.
|How did Taka get all of that merch into the house?
|Dude is running his business out of Terrace House.
I assume this is colloquial, and standard speech would
require something like "This dude".
No, "dude" is already colloquial. Standard would require something
like "the man" or simply "he".
Post by Stefan Ram
So, what would be the rule from colloquial speech used above
that allows an article to be dropped that should be there in
standard English? I.e., Under which circumstances is such a
dropping possible?
I have no idea.
--
Mark Brader | "Next time I will proofread my before sending it out. ;-)"
Toronto | --Kevin Rushforth
***@vex.net | "What? What!? Proofread your what??!!!" --Larry Smith
b***@shaw.ca
2020-01-02 06:33:35 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Stefan Ram
I recently saw an article being dropped (omitted) by a
presumed native speakers of English in a situation where
the dropping of the article surprised me.
|How did Taka get all of that merch into the house?
|Dude is running his business out of Terrace House.
I assume this is colloquial, and standard speech would
require something like "This dude".
No, "dude" is already colloquial. Standard would require something
like "the man" or simply "he".
Post by Stefan Ram
So, what would be the rule from colloquial speech used above
that allows an article to be dropped that should be there in
standard English? I.e., Under which circumstances is such a
dropping possible?
It is possible every time anyone says something. It is not about rules.
It is about how people choose to talk. They don't need anyone's permission
to talk as they do.

bill
Quinn C
2020-01-02 18:50:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Stefan Ram
I recently saw an article being dropped (omitted) by a
presumed native speakers of English in a situation where
the dropping of the article surprised me.
|How did Taka get all of that merch into the house?
|Dude is running his business out of Terrace House.
I assume this is colloquial, and standard speech would
require something like "This dude".
No, "dude" is already colloquial. Standard would require something
like "the man" or simply "he".
Post by Stefan Ram
So, what would be the rule from colloquial speech used above
that allows an article to be dropped that should be there in
standard English? I.e., Under which circumstances is such a
dropping possible?
It is possible every time anyone says something. It is not about rules.
It is about how people choose to talk. They don't need anyone's permission
to talk as they do.
They are "permitted" to speak any way that their communication partners
are ready to interpret.

Please use the definitions appropriate in context. The laws of physics
aren't enforced in any court.
--
(\_/)
(='.'=) This is Bunny. Copy and paste Bunny into your
(")_(") signature to help him gain world domination.
Ross
2020-01-02 07:20:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Stefan Ram
I recently saw an article being dropped (omitted) by a
presumed native speakers of English in a situation where
the dropping of the article surprised me.
|How did Taka get all of that merch into the house?
|Dude is running his business out of Terrace House.
I assume this is colloquial, and standard speech would
require something like "This dude".
No, "dude" is already colloquial. Standard would require something
like "the man" or simply "he".
Post by Stefan Ram
So, what would be the rule from colloquial speech used above
that allows an article to be dropped that should be there in
standard English? I.e., Under which circumstances is such a
dropping possible?
I have no idea.
--
Mark Brader | "Next time I will proofread my before sending it out. ;-)"
Toronto | --Kevin Rushforth
Try "unstressed word at beginning of sentence" for a
first approximation.

Cat got your tongue?
Going to the game?
Fucking fucker's fucked.
Horace LaBadie
2020-01-02 06:33:59 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
I recently saw an article being dropped (omitted) by a
presumed native speakers of English in a situation where
the dropping of the article surprised me.
|How did Taka get all of that merch into the house?
|Dude is running his business out of Terrace House.
I assume this is colloquial, and standard speech would
require something like "This dude". However, colloquial
speech has its own rules, it's not like, "anything goes".
So, what would be the rule from colloquial speech used above
that allows an article to be dropped that should be there in
standard English? I.e., Under which circumstances is such a
dropping possible?
(To further explain the question: I assume the article
"the" in front of "house" above cannot be droppped -
even in colloquial speech. So there must be a rule about
when the article can be dropped.)
Dude is standing in for "he," or more indirectly for his name. Not
unusual.

"The Dude" is reserved for Jeff Bridges.
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2020-01-05 16:12:48 UTC
Permalink
Post by Horace LaBadie
Post by Stefan Ram
I recently saw an article being dropped (omitted) by a
presumed native speakers of English in a situation where
the dropping of the article surprised me.
|How did Taka get all of that merch into the house?
|Dude is running his business out of Terrace House.
I assume this is colloquial, and standard speech would
require something like "This dude". However, colloquial
speech has its own rules, it's not like, "anything goes".
So, what would be the rule from colloquial speech used above
that allows an article to be dropped that should be there in
standard English? I.e., Under which circumstances is such a
dropping possible?
(To further explain the question: I assume the article
"the" in front of "house" above cannot be droppped -
even in colloquial speech. So there must be a rule about
when the article can be dropped.)
Dude is standing in for "he," or more indirectly for his name. Not
unusual.
Another way of describing it is that "Dude" is being used as a proper
noun. That "propering" of nouns is common with nouns referring to
people.

Someone might address or refer to their dad as Dad.
Similarly with other relatives.
Post by Horace LaBadie
"The Dude" is reserved for Jeff Bridges.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Stefan Ram
2020-01-05 16:39:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Another way of describing it is that "Dude" is being used as a proper
noun. That "propering" of nouns is common with nouns referring to
people.
I recently observed it in the same source:

There was a woman shown in a TV series who met two other
women, both giggling and one was wearing an eye-patch (in
Japan, this sometimes has medical reasons, sometimes it is
a fashion statement).

Now, the names of those girls where somewhat hard to
remember, so their properties were quickly turned into
names:

|Remember that early scene a few episodes back when ami was
|with her friends Giggles and Eyepatch and they laughed
|mirthfully as she tore apart the guys on the show behind
|their backs in that bored deadpan voice?

"Giggles and Eyepatch" reminds me of Shakespearian names
like "Peaseblossom", "Cobweb", "Moth", or "Mustardseed".

(But actually, "Dude" does not exactly fit this scheme,
because it's not a property nor a metaphor.)

I really enjoy reading those comments about a TV series!

Some parts I enjoyed:

Vivi was very eloquently talking to someone, so:

|At first I thought Kai was gonna become the house therapist
|but then Vivi hit us with a whole ass Ted Talk.

. (I'd prefer the spelling "whole-ass" here, though.)
A woman was agreeing to intimate relations with a guy
who just casually asked her about this, so:

|especially how [she] just lets this guy ride the
|rollercoaster without buying a ticket

. Vivi is more attractive than Emika (for many viewers) and
seems to have little scruples, and both like the same man, so:

|If, indeed, Ryo finds Vivi attractive, she will squash
|Emika like a bug without even noticing.
...
|I can already see her playing Ryo like a fiddle and walking
|all over the other two girls.

. Ami acts somewhat cruel towards Yuudai, so:

|To a person like this hypothetical Ami, god himself could
|not have made a better target for her latent need to
|humiliate and destroy than Yuudai. It’s like a serial
|killer’s need to torture small animals.

.

Loading...