Discussion:
Pronunciation of widershins?
(too old to reply)
Dingbat
2019-12-01 21:58:03 UTC
Permalink
Pronunciation of widershins?
The same as the pronunciation of the other 3 spellings or different?

Alternate spellings: widdershins, widershins, widderschynnes, withershins
From Middle Low German weddersinnes, literally "against the way"
(i.e. "in the opposite direction"), from widersinnen "to go against",
from Old High German elements widar "against" and sinnen "to travel,
go", related to sind "journey".  
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Widdershins
  
The spelling with a single d is curious insofar as it gives the word a
different pronunciation, in English, from the other 3 spellings which
would yield the same pronunciation.
Katy Jennison
2019-12-01 22:44:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Pronunciation of widershins?
The same as the pronunciation of the other 3 spellings or different?
Alternate spellings: widdershins, widershins, widderschynnes, withershins
From Middle Low German weddersinnes, literally "against the way"
(i.e. "in the opposite direction"), from widersinnen "to go against",
from Old High German elements widar "against" and sinnen "to travel,
go", related to sind "journey".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Widdershins
The spelling with a single d is curious insofar as it gives the word a
different pronunciation, in English, from the other 3 spellings which
would yield the same pronunciation.
I don't remember ever seeing it spelt other than 'widdershins', and if
there's a rare variant with only one d I'd expect it nevertheless to be
pronounced the same.
--
Katy Jennison
Lewis
2019-12-01 23:46:49 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Dingbat
Pronunciation of widershins?
The same as the pronunciation of the other 3 spellings or different?
Alternate spellings: widdershins, widershins, widderschynnes, withershins
From Middle Low German weddersinnes, literally "against the way"
(i.e. "in the opposite direction"), from widersinnen "to go against",
from Old High German elements widar "against" and sinnen "to travel,
go", related to sind "journey".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Widdershins
The spelling with a single d is curious insofar as it gives the word a
different pronunciation, in English, from the other 3 spellings which
would yield the same pronunciation.
I don't remember ever seeing it spelt other than 'widdershins', and if
there's a rare variant with only one d I'd expect it nevertheless to be
pronounced the same.
I have seen withershins put classed it a misspelling.
--
Well- sometimes I have the feeling that I can do crystal meth, but
then I think, mmmm- better not.
Jerry Friedman
2019-12-02 00:06:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Lewis
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Dingbat
Pronunciation of widershins?
The same as the pronunciation of the other 3 spellings or different?
Alternate spellings: widdershins, widershins, widderschynnes, withershins
From Middle Low German weddersinnes, literally "against the way"
(i.e. "in the opposite direction"), from widersinnen "to go against",
from Old High German elements widar "against" and sinnen "to travel,
go", related to sind "journey".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Widdershins
The spelling with a single d is curious insofar as it gives the word a
different pronunciation, in English, from the other 3 spellings which
would yield the same pronunciation.
I don't remember ever seeing it spelt other than 'widdershins', and if
there's a rare variant with only one d I'd expect it nevertheless to be
pronounced the same.
I have seen withershins put classed it a misspelling.
The OED gives the spelling "withershins" first, though it's later by
almost a century and only a few of their citations have a "th". OK, if
you must know, four out of seventeen.
--
Jerry Friedman
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-12-02 06:15:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Dingbat
Pronunciation of widershins?
The same as the pronunciation of the other 3 spellings or different?
Alternate spellings: widdershins, widershins, widderschynnes, withershins
From Middle Low German weddersinnes, literally "against the way"
(i.e. "in the opposite direction"), from widersinnen "to go against",
from Old High German elements widar "against" and sinnen "to travel,
go", related to sind "journey".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Widdershins
The spelling with a single d is curious insofar as it gives the word a
different pronunciation, in English, from the other 3 spellings which
would yield the same pronunciation.
I don't remember ever seeing it spelt other than 'widdershins', and if
there's a rare variant with only one d I'd expect it nevertheless to be
pronounced the same.
Ditto.
--
athel
charles
2019-12-02 09:18:26 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Dingbat
Pronunciation of widershins?
The same as the pronunciation of the other 3 spellings or different?
Alternate spellings: widdershins, widershins, widderschynnes, withershins
From Middle Low German weddersinnes, literally "against the way"
(i.e. "in the opposite direction"), from widersinnen "to go against",
from Old High German elements widar "against" and sinnen "to travel,
go", related to sind "journey".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Widdershins
The spelling with a single d is curious insofar as it gives the word a
different pronunciation, in English, from the other 3 spellings which
would yield the same pronunciation.
I don't remember ever seeing it spelt other than 'widdershins', and if
there's a rare variant with only one d I'd expect it nevertheless to be
pronounced the same.
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop said
we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one of the
psalms.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Sam Plusnet
2019-12-02 21:10:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop said
we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one of the
psalms.
I wonder why the direction of travel was considered significant?
Where the Beating of the Bounds still takes place in some parishes, I
can't find any suggestion that the direction is specified.
--
Sam Plusnet
charles
2019-12-02 21:25:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop
said we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one
of the psalms.
I wonder why the direction of travel was considered significant? Where
the Beating of the Bounds still takes place in some parishes, I can't
find any suggestion that the direction is specified.
After the ceremony, the bishop admitted that she'd made the whole thing up.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Sam Plusnet
2019-12-03 00:44:24 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by charles
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop
said we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one
of the psalms.
I wonder why the direction of travel was considered significant? Where
the Beating of the Bounds still takes place in some parishes, I can't
find any suggestion that the direction is specified.
After the ceremony, the bishop admitted that she'd made the whole thing up.
Oh good! I'm happy to know that the CofE is in good hands.
--
Sam Plusnet
Madhu
2019-12-04 16:58:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by charles
Post by charles
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop
said we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one
of the psalms.
I wonder why the direction of travel was considered significant? Where
the Beating of the Bounds still takes place in some parishes, I can't
find any suggestion that the direction is specified.
After the ceremony, the bishop admitted that she'd made the whole thing up.
Oh good! I'm happy to know that the CofE is in good hands.
Better than the church that makes the laity go around the plot on their
knees moving forward with their shins.

Jerry Friedman
2019-12-02 21:40:25 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by charles
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop said
we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one of the
psalms.
I wonder why the direction of travel was considered significant?
Where the Beating of the Bounds still takes place in some parishes, I
can't find any suggestion that the direction is specified.
And why widdershins, the sense more often associated with witchcraft?
--
Jerry Friedman
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-12-02 21:51:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by charles
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop said
we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one of the
psalms.
I wonder why the direction of travel was considered significant?
Where the Beating of the Bounds still takes place in some parishes, I
can't find any suggestion that the direction is specified.
And why widdershins, the sense more often associated with witchcraft?
I wondered that.
--
athel
Mack A. Damia
2019-12-02 22:09:13 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 2 Dec 2019 22:51:04 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by charles
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop said
we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one of the
psalms.
I wonder why the direction of travel was considered significant?
Where the Beating of the Bounds still takes place in some parishes, I
can't find any suggestion that the direction is specified.
And why widdershins, the sense more often associated with witchcraft?
I wondered that.
"Left" - The left hand is the "Devil's hand". Left-handedness has
historically been regarded as the mark of the devil, and during the
Salem Witch Trials, it was considered the sign of a witch.

Widdershins is a term meaning to go counter-clockwise, to go
anti-clockwise, or to go lefthandwise, or to walk around an object by
always keeping it on the left.
David Kleinecke
2019-12-02 22:27:57 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Mon, 2 Dec 2019 22:51:04 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by charles
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop said
we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one of the
psalms.
I wonder why the direction of travel was considered significant?
Where the Beating of the Bounds still takes place in some parishes, I
can't find any suggestion that the direction is specified.
And why widdershins, the sense more often associated with witchcraft?
I wondered that.
"Left" - The left hand is the "Devil's hand". Left-handedness has
historically been regarded as the mark of the devil, and during the
Salem Witch Trials, it was considered the sign of a witch.
Widdershins is a term meaning to go counter-clockwise, to go
anti-clockwise, or to go lefthandwise, or to walk around an object by
always keeping it on the left.
Is "shins" the opposite of "withershins"? If not, why not?
"Clockwise"? "Counter-withershins"?
Katy Jennison
2019-12-02 23:06:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Mon, 2 Dec 2019 22:51:04 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by charles
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop said
we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one of the
psalms.
I wonder why the direction of travel was considered significant?
Where the Beating of the Bounds still takes place in some parishes, I
can't find any suggestion that the direction is specified.
And why widdershins, the sense more often associated with witchcraft?
I wondered that.
"Left" - The left hand is the "Devil's hand". Left-handedness has
historically been regarded as the mark of the devil, and during the
Salem Witch Trials, it was considered the sign of a witch.
Widdershins is a term meaning to go counter-clockwise, to go
anti-clockwise, or to go lefthandwise, or to walk around an object by
always keeping it on the left.
Is "shins" the opposite of "withershins"? If not, why not?
"Clockwise"? "Counter-withershins"?
The usual opposite of widdershins is deosil (= sunwise).
--
Katy Jennison
Peter Moylan
2019-12-03 03:08:14 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by David Kleinecke
Post by Mack A. Damia
Widdershins is a term meaning to go counter-clockwise, to go
anti-clockwise, or to go lefthandwise, or to walk around an
object by always keeping it on the left.
Is "shins" the opposite of "withershins"? If not, why not?
"Clockwise"? "Counter-withershins"?
The usual opposite of widdershins is deosil (= sunwise).
And both of those terms become confusing when you cross the equator.
From my point of view, the sun goes anticlockwise. (So a sundial is a
clock that goes anticlockwise.) In the tropics, widdershins presumably
means moving from west to east.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Dingbat
2019-12-02 23:46:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
The left hand is the "Devil's hand".
I wonder who sits at the left hand of the Father:->
Post by Mack A. Damia
Left-handedness has
historically been regarded as the mark of the devil, and during the
Salem Witch Trials, it was considered the sign of a witch.
Oh my GAUCHE, positively SINISTER!
Post by Mack A. Damia
Widdershins is a term meaning to go counter-clockwise, to go
anti-clockwise, or to go lefthandwise, or to walk around an object by
always keeping it on the left.
Richard Heathfield
2019-12-02 23:52:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Post by Mack A. Damia
The left hand is the "Devil's hand".
I wonder who sits at the left hand of the Father:->
Post by Mack A. Damia
Left-handedness has
historically been regarded as the mark of the devil, and during the
Salem Witch Trials, it was considered the sign of a witch.
Oh my GAUCHE,
That may qualify as the worst aue pun of the day. Well played, sir!
--
Richard Heathfield
Email: rjh at cpax dot org dot uk
"Usenet is a strange place" - dmr 29 July 1999
Sig line 4 vacant - apply within
Dingbat
2019-12-03 00:15:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Mon, 2 Dec 2019 22:51:04 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by charles
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop said
we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one of the
psalms.
I wonder why the direction of travel was considered significant?
Where the Beating of the Bounds still takes place in some parishes, I
can't find any suggestion that the direction is specified.
And why widdershins, the sense more often associated with witchcraft?
I wondered that.
"Left" - The left hand is the "Devil's hand". Left-handedness has
historically been regarded as the mark of the devil, and during the
Salem Witch Trials, it was considered the sign of a witch.
Oh my GAUCHE, positively SINISTER!
Post by Mack A. Damia
Widdershins is a term meaning to go counter-clockwise, to go
anti-clockwise, or to go lefthandwise, or to walk around an object by
always keeping it on the left.
RH Draney
2019-12-03 01:25:06 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
"Left" - The left hand is the "Devil's hand". Left-handedness has
historically been regarded as the mark of the devil, and during the
Salem Witch Trials, it was considered the sign of a witch.
Widdershins is a term meaning to go counter-clockwise, to go
anti-clockwise, or to go lefthandwise, or to walk around an object by
always keeping it on the left.
It's also how a couple progresses around a ballroom while dancing....r
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-12-03 07:26:05 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Mon, 2 Dec 2019 22:51:04 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by charles
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop said
we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one of the
psalms.
I wonder why the direction of travel was considered significant?
Where the Beating of the Bounds still takes place in some parishes, I
can't find any suggestion that the direction is specified.
And why widdershins, the sense more often associated with witchcraft?
I wondered that.
"Left" - The left hand is the "Devil's hand". Left-handedness has
historically been regarded as the mark of the devil, and during the
Salem Witch Trials, it was considered the sign of a witch.
Widdershins is a term meaning to go counter-clockwise, to go
anti-clockwise, or to go lefthandwise, or to walk around an object by
always keeping it on the left.
Well yes, I knew all that. What I didn't know, and your reply doesn't
reveal, is why the Bishop specified the Black-Mass direction.
--
athel
Katy Jennison
2019-12-03 08:51:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Mon, 2 Dec 2019 22:51:04 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by charles
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop said
we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one of the
psalms.
I wonder why the direction of travel was considered significant?
Where the Beating of the Bounds still takes place in some parishes, I
can't find any suggestion that the direction is specified.
And why widdershins, the sense more often associated with witchcraft?
I wondered that.
"Left" - The left hand is the "Devil's hand". Left-handedness has
historically been regarded as the mark of the devil, and during the
Salem Witch Trials, it was considered the sign of a witch.
Widdershins is a term meaning to go counter-clockwise, to go
anti-clockwise, or to go lefthandwise, or to walk around an object by
always keeping it on the left.
Well yes, I knew all that. What I didn't know, and your reply doesn't
reveal, is why the Bishop specified the Black-Mass direction.
Possibly she wasn't aware of that particular association. But if it
weren't that Charles says she made it all up anyway, I'd conjecture that
since clockwise, deosil, sun-wise, can symbolise life, so
anti-clockwise, widdershins, moon-wise, can symbolise death. They were
consecrating a burial ground, so that would seem appropriate.
--
Katy Jennison
Jerry Friedman
2019-12-03 18:11:54 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Mon, 2 Dec 2019 22:51:04 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by charles
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop said
we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one
of the psalms.
I wonder why the direction of travel was considered significant?
Where the Beating of the Bounds still takes place in some parishes, I
can't find any suggestion that the direction is specified.
And why widdershins, the sense more often associated with witchcraft?
I wondered that.
"Left" - The left hand is the "Devil's hand". Left-handedness has
historically been regarded as the mark of the devil, and during the
Salem Witch Trials, it was considered the sign of a witch.
Widdershins is a term meaning to go counter-clockwise, to go
anti-clockwise, or to go lefthandwise, or to walk around an object by
always keeping it on the left.
Well yes, I knew all that. What I didn't know, and your reply doesn't
reveal, is why the Bishop specified the Black-Mass direction.
Possibly she wasn't aware of that particular association. But if it
weren't that Charles says she made it all up anyway, I'd conjecture that
since clockwise, deosil, sun-wise, can symbolise life, so
anti-clockwise, widdershins, moon-wise, can symbolise death. They were
consecrating a burial ground, so that would seem appropriate.
Or she thought "widdershins" was a funnier word than "deosil", or
more likely to be known to the... beaters?, or easier for her to
pronounce.
--
Jerry Friedman
charles
2019-12-03 10:08:27 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Mon, 2 Dec 2019 22:51:04 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by charles
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop said
we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one of the
psalms.
I wonder why the direction of travel was considered significant?
Where the Beating of the Bounds still takes place in some parishes, I
can't find any suggestion that the direction is specified.
And why widdershins, the sense more often associated with witchcraft?
I wondered that.
"Left" - The left hand is the "Devil's hand". Left-handedness has
historically been regarded as the mark of the devil, and during the
Salem Witch Trials, it was considered the sign of a witch.
in latin, if I remember correctly from school 60+ years ago) the word is
'sinister'. Also used in heraldry.
Post by Mack A. Damia
Widdershins is a term meaning to go counter-clockwise, to go
anti-clockwise, or to go lefthandwise, or to walk around an object by
always keeping it on the left.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Rich Ulrich
2019-12-03 17:50:39 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 02 Dec 2019 14:09:13 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Mon, 2 Dec 2019 22:51:04 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by charles
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop said
we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one of the
psalms.
I wonder why the direction of travel was considered significant?
Where the Beating of the Bounds still takes place in some parishes, I
can't find any suggestion that the direction is specified.
And why widdershins, the sense more often associated with witchcraft?
I wondered that.
"Left" - The left hand is the "Devil's hand". Left-handedness has
historically been regarded as the mark of the devil, and during the
Salem Witch Trials, it was considered the sign of a witch.
Widdershins is a term meaning to go counter-clockwise, to go
anti-clockwise, or to go lefthandwise, or to walk around an object by
always keeping it on the left.
IIRC, it was in an explanation of "coils" in Shakespeare
that I read about the lines connecting individuals to the
astrological planets, thus wrapping them "in coils" as the
world spins.

This was then associated with witchcraft. A ritual that
moved "anti-sunwise" was symbolically, and by sympathetic
magic, unwrapping the coils - removing the ordinary
influences - in order to prepare the subject/victim for a
ritual that would establish new influences.

Since I never ran across that explanation elsewhere, I
suspect I may have read someone's unique folk-explanation.
But I still like it.
--
Rich Ulrich
Peter T. Daniels
2019-12-03 21:05:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Rich Ulrich
On Mon, 02 Dec 2019 14:09:13 -0800, Mack A. Damia
Post by Mack A. Damia
On Mon, 2 Dec 2019 22:51:04 +0100, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Jerry Friedman
And why widdershins, the sense more often associated with witchcraft?
I wondered that.
"Left" - The left hand is the "Devil's hand". Left-handedness has
historically been regarded as the mark of the devil, and during the
Salem Witch Trials, it was considered the sign of a witch.
Widdershins is a term meaning to go counter-clockwise, to go
anti-clockwise, or to go lefthandwise, or to walk around an object by
always keeping it on the left.
IIRC, it was in an explanation of "coils" in Shakespeare
as in "shuffle off this mortal" one? A line that has occasioned many
a note.
Post by Rich Ulrich
that I read about the lines connecting individuals to the
astrological planets, thus wrapping them "in coils" as the
world spins.
Quinn C
2019-12-02 22:49:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by charles
Post by Katy Jennison
I don't remember ever seeing it spelt other than 'widdershins', and if
there's a rare variant with only one d I'd expect it nevertheless to be
pronounced the same.
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop said
we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one of the
psalms.
Sure that was a church, not a lodge or a coven or something?
--
Quinn C
My pronouns are they/them
(or other gender-neutral ones)
charles
2019-12-03 10:09:41 UTC
Permalink
Post by Quinn C
Post by charles
Post by Katy Jennison
I don't remember ever seeing it spelt other than 'widdershins', and if
there's a rare variant with only one d I'd expect it nevertheless to
be pronounced the same.
the only time I've met the word spoken by someone was when our Parish
Church had an enlargement of the burial ground consecrated. The Bishop
said we had to walk round the new plot widdershins whilst reciting one
of the psalms.
Sure that was a church, not a lodge or a coven or something?
I am absolutely sure it was, and is, a church (has been since tne 11th
Century)
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Jerry Friedman
2019-12-02 00:00:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Dingbat
Pronunciation of widershins?
The same as the pronunciation of the other 3 spellings or different?
Alternate spellings: widdershins, widershins, widderschynnes, withershins
From Middle Low German weddersinnes, literally "against the way"
(i.e. "in the opposite direction"), from widersinnen "to go against",
from Old High German elements widar "against" and sinnen "to travel,
go", related to sind "journey".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Widdershins
The spelling with a single d is curious insofar as it gives the word a
different pronunciation, in English, from the other 3 spellings which
would yield the same pronunciation.
Not necessarily a different pronunciation. Consider "widow".
--
Jerry Friedman
Anders D. Nygaard
2019-12-02 17:30:59 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
Pronunciation of widershins?
The same as the pronunciation of the other 3 spellings or different?
Alternate spellings: widdershins, widershins, widderschynnes, withershins
From Middle Low German weddersinnes, literally "against the way"
(i.e. "in the opposite direction"), from widersinnen "to go against",
from Old High German elements widar "against" and sinnen "to travel,
go", related to sind "journey".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Widdershins
The spelling with a single d is curious insofar as it gives the word a
different pronunciation, in English, from the other 3 spellings which
would yield the same pronunciation.
Would -dd- give the same pronunciation as -th-? I'd say [-d-] and [-D-],
respectively.

/Anders, Denmark.
Dingbat
2019-12-02 19:41:27 UTC
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Post by Anders D. Nygaard
Post by Dingbat
Pronunciation of widershins?
The same as the pronunciation of the other 3 spellings or different?
Alternate spellings: widdershins, widershins, widderschynnes, withershins
From Middle Low German weddersinnes, literally "against the way"
(i.e. "in the opposite direction"), from widersinnen "to go against",
from Old High German elements widar "against" and sinnen "to travel,
go", related to sind "journey".
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Widdershins
The spelling with a single d is curious insofar as it gives the word a
different pronunciation, in English, from the other 3 spellings which
would yield the same pronunciation.
Would -dd- give the same pronunciation as -th-? I'd say [-d-] and [-D-],
respectively.
No, but they'd give the same pronunciation of the 1st <i>.
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