Discussion:
to prompt a bill?
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Yurui Liu
2019-11-08 05:03:36 UTC
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Hi,

What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce" when
the object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?

John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.

I'd appreciate your help.
Jerry Friedman
2019-11-08 05:26:00 UTC
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Post by Yurui Liu
Hi,
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce" when
the object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill." I'd expect a bill to be
prompted by a request, a recognition of a problem or opportunity, etc.
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter Moylan
2019-11-08 06:33:41 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Yurui Liu
Hi,
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce" when
the object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill." I'd expect a bill to be
prompted by a request, a recognition of a problem or opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
b***@shaw.ca
2019-11-08 06:42:39 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Yurui Liu
Hi,
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce" when
the object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill." I'd expect a bill to be
prompted by a request, a recognition of a problem or opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
I don't think a bill, being an inanimate thing, can be prompted.
The writing of the bill or the introduction of the bill or the
passage of the bill can be prompted, however. A human agency
is required for any of those steps. You can shout at the bill
itself until you're blue in the face, and nothing will happen.

bill
CDB
2019-11-08 11:12:22 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Yurui Liu
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce" when
the object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill." I'd expect a
bill to be prompted by a request, a recognition of a problem or
opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
I don't think a bill, being an inanimate thing, can be prompted. The
writing of the bill or the introduction of the bill or the passage of
the bill can be prompted, however. A human agency is required for any
of those steps. You can shout at the bill itself until you're blue in
the face, and nothing will happen.
I wonder if it could be a misprint for "promoted". That is still not the
equivalent of "introduced", but it makes more sense in context.
Jerry Friedman
2019-11-08 14:41:39 UTC
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Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Moylan
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce" when the
object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill."  I'd expect a
bill to be prompted by a request, a recognition of a problem or
opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
I don't think a bill, being an inanimate thing, can be prompted. The
writing of the bill or the introduction of the bill or the passage of
the bill can be prompted, however. A human agency is required for any
of those steps. You can shout at the bill itself until you're blue in
the face, and nothing will happen.
I wonder if it could be a misprint for "promoted". That is still not the
equivalent of "introduced", but it makes more sense in context.
Ah, that seems likely.
--
Jerry Friedman
Peter Moylan
2019-11-08 23:47:33 UTC
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Permalink
On Friday, November 8, 2019 at 6:41:43 AM UTC-8, Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
I wonder if it could be a misprint for "promoted". That is still
not the equivalent of "introduced", but it makes more sense in
context.
Ah, that seems likely.
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce"...
And that seems like an unlikely typo for "promote".
A typo, followed by accepting bad advice from one's spelling checker, is
a lot more likely if it's not your native language.

(The 'o' key on my keyboard doesn't work as well as the others, so it
would not be unusual fr me to type "promte" or even "prmte" when I
intended to type "promote".)
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Jerry Friedman
2019-11-09 01:33:55 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Moylan
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce" when the
object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill."  I'd expect a
bill to be prompted by a request, a recognition of a problem or
opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
I don't think a bill, being an inanimate thing, can be prompted. The
writing of the bill or the introduction of the bill or the passage of
the bill can be prompted, however. A human agency is required for any
of those steps. You can shout at the bill itself until you're blue in
the face, and nothing will happen.
I wonder if it could be a misprint for "promoted". That is still not the
equivalent of "introduced", but it makes more sense in context.
Ah, that seems likely.
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce"...
And that seems like an unlikely typo for "promote".
Yurui Liu might have seen "So-and-so prompted the bill" as a typo for
"promoted", and thus been prompted to ask about it.
--
Jerry Friedman
b***@shaw.ca
2019-11-09 06:28:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Moylan
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce" when the
object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill."  I'd expect a
bill to be prompted by a request, a recognition of a problem or
opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
I don't think a bill, being an inanimate thing, can be prompted. The
writing of the bill or the introduction of the bill or the passage of
the bill can be prompted, however. A human agency is required for any
of those steps. You can shout at the bill itself until you're blue in
the face, and nothing will happen.
I wonder if it could be a misprint for "promoted". That is still not the
equivalent of "introduced", but it makes more sense in context.
Ah, that seems likely.
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce"...
And that seems like an unlikely typo for "promote".
Yurui Liu might have seen "So-and-so prompted the bill" as a typo for
"promoted", and thus been prompted to ask about it.
And that prompted me -- another bill -- to get into the act.

bill
CDB
2019-11-09 12:40:00 UTC
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Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by CDB
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Yurui Liu
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce"
when the object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill." I'd expect
a bill to be prompted by a request, a recognition of a
problem or opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
I don't think a bill, being an inanimate thing, can be
prompted. The writing of the bill or the introduction of the
bill or the passage of the bill can be prompted, however. A
human agency is required for any of those steps. You can shout
at the bill itself until you're blue in the face, and nothing
will happen.
I wonder if it could be a misprint for "promoted". That is still
not the equivalent of "introduced", but it makes more sense in
context.
Ah, that seems likely.
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce"...
And that seems like an unlikely typo for "promote".
That seems to be his deduction from what I took for the inspiration of
question, "John prompted the bill".
Yurui Liu
2019-11-09 02:37:23 UTC
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CDB於 2019年11月8日星期五 UTC+8下午7時12分29秒寫道:
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Yurui Liu
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce" when
the object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill." I'd expect a
bill to be prompted by a request, a recognition of a problem or
opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
I don't think a bill, being an inanimate thing, can be prompted. The
writing of the bill or the introduction of the bill or the passage of
the bill can be prompted, however. A human agency is required for any
of those steps. You can shout at the bill itself until you're blue in
the face, and nothing will happen.
I wonder if it could be a misprint for "promoted". That is still not the
equivalent of "introduced", but it makes more sense in context.
What does it mean to promote a bill? To sponsor it?
b***@shaw.ca
2019-11-09 02:47:34 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Yurui Liu
CDB於 2019年11月8日星期五 UTC+8下午7時12分29秒寫道:
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Yurui Liu
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce" when
the object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill." I'd expect a
bill to be prompted by a request, a recognition of a problem or
opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
I don't think a bill, being an inanimate thing, can be prompted. The
writing of the bill or the introduction of the bill or the passage of
the bill can be prompted, however. A human agency is required for any
of those steps. You can shout at the bill itself until you're blue in
the face, and nothing will happen.
I wonder if it could be a misprint for "promoted". That is still not the
equivalent of "introduced", but it makes more sense in context.
What does it mean to promote a bill? To sponsor it?
In this context, it would mean to publicize and praise it
in order to increase public or political support for it.

bill
Tony Cooper
2019-11-09 02:56:22 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 18:37:23 -0800 (PST), Yurui Liu
CDB? 2019?11?8???? UTC+8??7?12?29????
Post by CDB
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Yurui Liu
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce" when
the object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill." I'd expect a
bill to be prompted by a request, a recognition of a problem or
opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
I don't think a bill, being an inanimate thing, can be prompted. The
writing of the bill or the introduction of the bill or the passage of
the bill can be prompted, however. A human agency is required for any
of those steps. You can shout at the bill itself until you're blue in
the face, and nothing will happen.
I wonder if it could be a misprint for "promoted". That is still not the
equivalent of "introduced", but it makes more sense in context.
What does it mean to promote a bill? To sponsor it?
No, it can mean to support the bill in any active way. A bill can be
promoted by someone who does nothing more than speak positively about
it.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
RH Draney
2019-11-09 10:24:58 UTC
Reply
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Post by Tony Cooper
On Fri, 8 Nov 2019 18:37:23 -0800 (PST), Yurui Liu
Post by Yurui Liu
What does it mean to promote a bill? To sponsor it?
No, it can mean to support the bill in any active way. A bill can be
promoted by someone who does nothing more than speak positively about
it.
Or to get Jack Sheldon to sing a song about it:



....r
CDB
2019-11-09 12:40:36 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by RH Draney
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Yurui Liu
What does it mean to promote a bill? To sponsor it?
No, it can mean to support the bill in any active way. A bill can
be promoted by someone who does nothing more than speak positively
about it.
http://youtu.be/tyeJ55o3El0
....r
Kinda reminds me of Towelie.
CDB
2019-11-09 12:40:29 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Yurui Liu
Post by CDB
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Yurui Liu
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce"
when the object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill." I'd expect
a bill to be prompted by a request, a recognition of a
problem or opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
I don't think a bill, being an inanimate thing, can be prompted.
The writing of the bill or the introduction of the bill or the
passage of the bill can be prompted, however. A human agency is
required for any of those steps. You can shout at the bill itself
until you're blue in the face, and nothing will happen.
I wonder if it could be a misprint for "promoted". That is still
not the equivalent of "introduced", but it makes more sense in
context.
What does it mean to promote a bill? To sponsor it?
Not precisely. It could mean to argue for it or to support it in
debate, or perhaps even to "co-sponsor" it. I suggested the change
because the alternative, "prompted", really doesn't make much sense in
that context.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-09 15:19:13 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Yurui Liu
Post by CDB
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Yurui Liu
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce"
when the object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill." I'd expect
a bill to be prompted by a request, a recognition of a
problem or opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
I don't think a bill, being an inanimate thing, can be prompted.
The writing of the bill or the introduction of the bill or the
passage of the bill can be prompted, however. A human agency is
required for any of those steps. You can shout at the bill itself
until you're blue in the face, and nothing will happen.
I wonder if it could be a misprint for "promoted". That is still
not the equivalent of "introduced", but it makes more sense in
context.
What does it mean to promote a bill? To sponsor it?
Not precisely. It could mean to argue for it or to support it in
debate, or perhaps even to "co-sponsor" it. I suggested the change
because the alternative, "prompted", really doesn't make much sense in
that context.
It's not a specialized use regarding legislation at all. It's merely the
ordinary word "promote" meaning 'publicize, speak in favor of'. It isn't
used of cosponsoring, which is something legislators are very proud of,
meaning that they put their name on it before it's introduced for debate.
CDB
2019-11-10 13:34:45 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Yurui Liu
Post by CDB
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Yurui Liu
What is the difference between "prompt" and
"introduce" when the object is "bill," i.e., a piece of
legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill." I'd
expect a bill to be prompted by a request, a recognition
of a problem or opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
I don't think a bill, being an inanimate thing, can be
prompted. The writing of the bill or the introduction of the
bill or the passage of the bill can be prompted, however. A
human agency is required for any of those steps. You can
shout at the bill itself until you're blue in the face, and
nothing will happen.
I wonder if it could be a misprint for "promoted". That is
still not the equivalent of "introduced", but it makes more
sense in context.
What does it mean to promote a bill? To sponsor it?
Not precisely. It could mean to argue for it or to support it in
debate, or perhaps even to "co-sponsor" it. I suggested the
change because the alternative, "prompted", really doesn't make
much sense in that context.
It's not a specialized use regarding legislation at all. It's merely
the ordinary word "promote" meaning 'publicize, speak in favor of'.
It isn't used of cosponsoring, which is something legislators are
very proud of, meaning that they put their name on it before it's
introduced for debate.
They are proud of helping to promote the bill. I did signal that it was
less directly applicable than my other suggestions. Did you take note
of the word "even"?
--
Or did your inner thistlebottom run away with you as usual?
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-10 20:19:10 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Yurui Liu
Post by CDB
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Yurui Liu
What is the difference between "prompt" and
"introduce" when the object is "bill," i.e., a piece of
legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill." I'd
expect a bill to be prompted by a request, a recognition
of a problem or opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
I don't think a bill, being an inanimate thing, can be
prompted. The writing of the bill or the introduction of the
bill or the passage of the bill can be prompted, however. A
human agency is required for any of those steps. You can
shout at the bill itself until you're blue in the face, and
nothing will happen.
I wonder if it could be a misprint for "promoted". That is
still not the equivalent of "introduced", but it makes more
sense in context.
What does it mean to promote a bill? To sponsor it?
Not precisely. It could mean to argue for it or to support it in
debate, or perhaps even to "co-sponsor" it. I suggested the
change because the alternative, "prompted", really doesn't make
much sense in that context.
It's not a specialized use regarding legislation at all. It's merely
the ordinary word "promote" meaning 'publicize, speak in favor of'.
It isn't used of cosponsoring, which is something legislators are
very proud of, meaning that they put their name on it before it's
introduced for debate.
They are proud of helping to promote the bill. I did signal that it was
less directly applicable than my other suggestions. Did you take note
of the word "even"?
That doesn't make it applicable.
Post by CDB
--
Or did your inner thistlebottom run away with you as usual?
It's the difference between "promote" and "co-sponsor." The latter is an
official thing, which can only be done by a legislator in the appropriate
house, but "promoting" is something anyone can do. Co-sponsoring isn't a
form of promoting. The two notions are orthogonal.
CDB
2019-11-10 21:21:18 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Yurui Liu
Post by CDB
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Yurui Liu
What is the difference between "prompt" and
"introduce" when the object is "bill," i.e., a
piece of legislation? John prompted/introduced the
bill in 2018. I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill." I'd
expect a bill to be prompted by a request, a
recognition of a problem or opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
I don't think a bill, being an inanimate thing, can be
prompted. The writing of the bill or the introduction of
the bill or the passage of the bill can be prompted,
however. A human agency is required for any of those
steps. You can shout at the bill itself until you're blue
in the face, and nothing will happen.
I wonder if it could be a misprint for "promoted". That is
still not the equivalent of "introduced", but it makes
more sense in context.
What does it mean to promote a bill? To sponsor it?
Not precisely. It could mean to argue for it or to support it
in debate, or perhaps even to "co-sponsor" it. I suggested
the change because the alternative, "prompted", really doesn't
make much sense in that context.
It's not a specialized use regarding legislation at all. It's
merely the ordinary word "promote" meaning 'publicize, speak in
favor of'. It isn't used of cosponsoring, which is something
legislators are very proud of, meaning that they put their name
on it before it's introduced for debate.
They are proud of helping to promote the bill. I did signal that
it was less directly applicable than my other suggestions. Did you
take note of the word "even"?
That doesn't make it applicable.
Post by CDB
-- Or did your inner thistlebottom run away with you as usual?
It's the difference between "promote" and "co-sponsor." The latter is
an official thing, which can only be done by a legislator in the
appropriate house, but "promoting" is something anyone can do.
Co-sponsoring isn't a form of promoting. The two notions are
orthogonal.
I'm done with this argument. You are a fool.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-10 21:28:25 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by CDB
Post by Yurui Liu
Post by CDB
Post by b***@shaw.ca
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Yurui Liu
What is the difference between "prompt" and
"introduce" when the object is "bill," i.e., a
piece of legislation? John prompted/introduced the
bill in 2018. I'd appreciate your help.
I don't recall seeing "John prompted the bill." I'd
expect a bill to be prompted by a request, a
recognition of a problem or opportunity, etc.
Is the example from an English-speaking country?
I don't think a bill, being an inanimate thing, can be
prompted. The writing of the bill or the introduction of
the bill or the passage of the bill can be prompted,
however. A human agency is required for any of those
steps. You can shout at the bill itself until you're blue
in the face, and nothing will happen.
I wonder if it could be a misprint for "promoted". That is
still not the equivalent of "introduced", but it makes
more sense in context.
What does it mean to promote a bill? To sponsor it?
Not precisely. It could mean to argue for it or to support it
in debate, or perhaps even to "co-sponsor" it. I suggested
the change because the alternative, "prompted", really doesn't
make much sense in that context.
It's not a specialized use regarding legislation at all. It's
merely the ordinary word "promote" meaning 'publicize, speak in
favor of'. It isn't used of cosponsoring, which is something
legislators are very proud of, meaning that they put their name
on it before it's introduced for debate.
They are proud of helping to promote the bill. I did signal that
it was less directly applicable than my other suggestions. Did you
take note of the word "even"?
That doesn't make it applicable.
Post by CDB
-- Or did your inner thistlebottom run away with you as usual?
It's the difference between "promote" and "co-sponsor." The latter is
an official thing, which can only be done by a legislator in the
appropriate house, but "promoting" is something anyone can do.
Co-sponsoring isn't a form of promoting. The two notions are
orthogonal.
I'm done with this argument. You are a fool.
Maybe in Canada legislators "promote" bills by putting their name on them.
Not here.
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-11-11 10:03:09 UTC
Reply
Permalink
[]
Post by CDB
I'm done with this argument. You are a fool.
By George, you've got it!
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-11 13:41:28 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Kerr-Mudd,John
Post by CDB
I'm done with this argument. You are a fool.
By George, you've got it!
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
And you are an ignoramus. (Still not one substantive contribution to
the newsgroup.)

Tony Cooper
2019-11-08 05:32:32 UTC
Reply
Permalink
On Thu, 7 Nov 2019 21:03:36 -0800 (PST), Yurui Liu
Post by Yurui Liu
Hi,
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce" when
the object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
Unless you have some example to cite, "John prompted the bill" is not
AmE usage.

John can draft, initiate, write or introduce the bill in AmE. Some
outside condition may have prompted him to do so. The need for the
bill may be prompted by some outside event.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Peter T. Daniels
2019-11-08 15:41:14 UTC
Reply
Permalink
Post by Yurui Liu
What is the difference between "prompt" and "introduce" when
the object is "bill," i.e., a piece of legislation?
John prompted/introduced the bill in 2018.
I'd appreciate your help.
Is that a Briticism or a Sinicism?
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