Discussion:
"a shot in the arm"
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Peter T. Daniels
2021-03-18 15:43:54 UTC
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Since Brits say "jab" and not "shot," do they have the idiom
"a shot in the arm" for something that gives an impetus to
something? Like, I dunno, "Casting Daniel Craig was a shot
in the arm for the rather tired Bond franchise"?

Or maybe they say it but its origin is opaque?
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2021-03-18 18:59:54 UTC
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On Thu, 18 Mar 2021 08:43:54 -0700 (PDT), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Since Brits say "jab" and not "shot," do they have the idiom
"a shot in the arm" for something that gives an impetus to
something? Like, I dunno, "Casting Daniel Craig was a shot
in the arm for the rather tired Bond franchise"?
Yes, it is used in BrE.
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Or maybe they say it but its origin is opaque?
The relevant sense of "jab" is apparently US in origin.
OED:
An injection with a hypodermic needle. slang (originally U.S.).
1914 L. E. Jackson & C. R. Hellyer Vocab. Criminal Slang 48 Jab,
current amongst morphine and cocaine fiends. A hypodermic
injection

That "A vocabulary of criminal slang, with some examples of common
usages · 1st edition" was published by the Modern Printing Co of
Portland, Or.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
Paul Carmichael
2021-03-19 08:37:11 UTC
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El 18/3/21 a las 19:59, Peter Duncanson [BrE] escribió:

<shot in the arm>
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Yes, it is used in BrE.
I've not heard it. Or maybe I have, I'm not sure. I certainly wouldn't use it. I think
something like saving grace or life-line might be more common.

But "a shot" in my Eng is a small glass of strong booze (normally after eating).

Obviously, it has many other less common meanings, such as in fishing and shooting.

Shot in the dark, on the other hand...
--
Paul.

https://paulc.es/elpatio
occam
2021-03-19 09:22:56 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
<shot in the arm>
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Yes, it is used in BrE.
I've not heard it. Or maybe I have, I'm not sure.
It is in use. I have heard it in news reports ("A shot in the arm of
manufacturing industry") and elsewhere.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Shot in the dark, on the other hand...
"A stab in the dark", for situations which do not involve firearms.
Janet
2021-03-19 11:31:51 UTC
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In article <***@mid.individual.net>, ***@nowhere.nix
says...
Post by occam
Post by Paul Carmichael
<shot in the arm>
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Yes, it is used in BrE.
I've not heard it. Or maybe I have, I'm not sure.
It is in use. I have heard it in news reports ("A shot in the arm of
manufacturing industry") and elsewhere.
Its in use in UK.

Janet
Snidely
2021-03-29 23:22:45 UTC
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Post by Paul Carmichael
<shot in the arm>
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Yes, it is used in BrE.
I've not heard it. Or maybe I have, I'm not sure. I certainly wouldn't use
it. I think something like saving grace or life-line might be more common.
"Life-line" seems ok, but "saving grace" sounds like something you
have, rather than have provided to you.
Post by Paul Carmichael
But "a shot" in my Eng is a small glass of strong booze (normally after eating).
Obviously, it has many other less common meanings, such as in fishing and shooting.
Shot in the dark, on the other hand...
You be careful walking around with those bloody great needles, please!

/dps
--
"That's a good sort of hectic, innit?"

" Very much so, and I'd recommend the haggis wontons."
-njm
Snidely
2021-03-29 23:31:54 UTC
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On Friday, Paul Carmichael pointed out that ...
Post by Paul Carmichael
But "a shot" in my Eng is a small glass of strong booze (normally after eating).
Served in a shot glass, by tradition.
Post by Paul Carmichael
Obviously, it has many other less common meanings, such as in fishing and shooting.
That leaden expression seems reasonably common. Many of the people I
know and meet would be likely to understand fishing shot; even more
would understand what a shot is in [a] shooting.

In photography, the expression is likely to be silvery for us
silver-heads, and the yunguns are likely take a shot with quartz [1].


[1] Yes, I know, silicon dioxide isn't an interesting sensor by itself,
any more than silver is; there's a few other things done to make it
camera-ready.

/dps
--
"First thing in the morning, before I have coffee, I read the obits, If
I'm not in it, I'll have breakfast." -- Carl Reiner, to CBS News in
2015.
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