Discussion:
altogether too much fun
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arthurvv vart
2021-03-30 09:08:25 UTC
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1) I had altogether too much fun writing this talk.

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14:47 to 14:50 approximately.

My problem is with the way she uses the word 'altogether'. I am not sure I understand her correctly.

To me, 'altogether' in '1' would mean 'on the whole', 'all things considered', but it seems to me that she uses it as an intensifier.

How do you understand the sentence?
Would you use 'altogether' in that way?

Gratefully,
Navi
Chrysi Cat
2021-03-30 10:43:16 UTC
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Post by arthurvv vart
1) I had altogether too much fun writing this talk.
http://youtu.be/4qG1GHs7CBQ
14:47 to 14:50 approximately.
My problem is with the way she uses the word 'altogether'. I am not sure I understand her correctly.
To me, 'altogether' in '1' would mean 'on the whole', 'all things considered', but it seems to me that she uses it as an intensifier.
How do you understand the sentence?
Would you use 'altogether' in that way?
Gratefully,
Navi
It may indeed have a literal meaning of "on the whole".

The usage as a generic intensifier, on the other hand, is older at least
in AmE than I am.
--
Chrysi Cat
1/2 anthrocat, nearly 1/2 anthrofox, all magical
Transgoddess, quick to anger. [she/her. Misgender and die].
Call me Chrysi or call me Kat, I'll respond to either!
Peter T. Daniels
2021-03-30 13:55:30 UTC
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Post by arthurvv vart
1) I had altogether too much fun writing this talk.
http://youtu.be/4qG1GHs7CBQ
14:47 to 14:50 approximately.
My problem is with the way she uses the word 'altogether'. I am not sure I understand her correctly.
To me, 'altogether' in '1' would mean 'on the whole', 'all things considered', but it seems to me that she uses it as an intensifier.
How do you understand the sentence?
Would you use 'altogether' in that way?
It means 'entirely', and why on earth not?

Presumably she's saying that writing talks is usually or supposed
to be an unpleasant chore, and she was pleasantly surprised this time.
Jerry Friedman
2021-03-30 16:42:32 UTC
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Post by arthurvv vart
1) I had altogether too much fun writing this talk.
http://youtu.be/4qG1GHs7CBQ
14:47 to 14:50 approximately.
My problem is with the way she uses the word 'altogether'. I am not sure I understand her correctly.
To me, 'altogether' in '1' would mean 'on the whole', 'all things considered', but it seems to me that she uses it as an intensifier.
Yes, "altogether" is one of the few words that can intensify "too".
"Entirely" and "far" are others.
Post by arthurvv vart
How do you understand the sentence?
Would you use 'altogether' in that way?
Probably not, but that's just me.
--
Jerry Friedman
arthurvv vart
2021-03-30 21:44:26 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by arthurvv vart
1) I had altogether too much fun writing this talk.
http://youtu.be/4qG1GHs7CBQ
14:47 to 14:50 approximately.
My problem is with the way she uses the word 'altogether'. I am not sure I understand her correctly.
To me, 'altogether' in '1' would mean 'on the whole', 'all things considered', but it seems to me that she uses it as an intensifier.
Yes, "altogether" is one of the few words that can intensify "too".
"Entirely" and "far" are others.
Post by arthurvv vart
How do you understand the sentence?
Would you use 'altogether' in that way?
Probably not, but that's just me.
--
Jerry Friedman
Thank you all very much,

Is it used that way only with 'too' or in other cases as well?

2) I had altogether a lot of fun writing this talk.

Would 'altogether' mean 'on the whole' or 'entirely' in '2'?

Gratefully,
Navi
Jerry Friedman
2021-03-30 23:10:03 UTC
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Post by arthurvv vart
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by arthurvv vart
1) I had altogether too much fun writing this talk.
http://youtu.be/4qG1GHs7CBQ
14:47 to 14:50 approximately.
My problem is with the way she uses the word 'altogether'. I am not sure I understand her correctly.
To me, 'altogether' in '1' would mean 'on the whole', 'all things considered', but it seems to me that she uses it as an intensifier.
Yes, "altogether" is one of the few words that can intensify "too".
"Entirely" and "far" are others.
And "much".
Post by arthurvv vart
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by arthurvv vart
How do you understand the sentence?
Would you use 'altogether' in that way?
Probably not, but that's just me.
--
Jerry Friedman
Thank you all very much,
Is it used that way only with 'too' or in other cases as well?
I can't think of any others, but someone will be along soon...
Post by arthurvv vart
2) I had altogether a lot of fun writing this talk.
Would 'altogether' mean 'on the whole' or 'entirely' in '2'?
"On the whole", and if I wrote it, "altogether" would have commas
around it.
--
Jerry Friedman
Eric Walker
2021-03-31 00:16:24 UTC
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On Tue, 30 Mar 2021 14:44:26 -0700, arthurvv vart wrote:

[...]
Post by arthurvv vart
Is it used that way only with 'too' or in other cases as well?
2) I had altogether a lot of fun writing this talk.
Would 'altogether' mean 'on the whole' or 'entirely' in '2'?
Not, I think, idiomatically. But I believe you could say--

2a) Altogether, I had a lot of fun writing this talk.

--without raising eyebrows. (Though I don't that a good way of
expressing the thought).

My sense of it (meaning no research) is that "altogether too much fun" is
a stock phrase.

Dr Google claims about 375,000 hits on the phrase (in quotation marks).
--
Cordially,
Eric Walker
Eric Walker
2021-03-31 00:12:02 UTC
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Post by arthurvv vart
1) I had altogether too much fun writing this talk.
http://youtu.be/4qG1GHs7CBQ
14:47 to 14:50 approximately.
My problem is with the way she uses the word 'altogether'. I am not sure
I understand her correctly.
To me, 'altogether' in '1' would mean 'on the whole', 'all things
considered', but it seems to me that she uses it as an intensifier.
How do you understand the sentence?
Would you use 'altogether' in that way?
Yes, definitely.

From the AHD 5th:

adv.
1. Entirely; completely; utterly:
lost the TV picture altogether; an altogether new approach.
2. With all included or counted; all told:
There were altogether 20 people at the dinner.
3. On the whole; with everything considered:
Altogether, I'm sorry it happened.

I daresay sense (1) meets the case.
--
Cordially,
Eric Walker
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