Discussion:
Words with two very varied meanings
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chandelle
2021-03-09 03:25:28 UTC
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I'm thinking of drawing up a list - just for fun - of words that have two meanings, neither of which remotely resembles the other, and seek your inputs as well.

Three words that readily come to mind are: husband, previous and cashier.

Additions will be welcome and gratefully acknowledged, thanks.
Peter Moylan
2021-03-09 04:21:24 UTC
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Post by chandelle
I'm thinking of drawing up a list - just for fun - of words that
have two meanings, neither of which remotely resembles the other, and
seek your inputs as well.
Three words that readily come to mind are: husband, previous and cashier.
Additions will be welcome and gratefully acknowledged, thanks.
Husband (noun) and husband (verb) have the same origin, so could be said
to be closely related in meaning. The duty of a husband (noun) is to
husband the house's resources.

Cashier is a good example of two words having different origins ending
up with the same spelling and pronunciation.

Previous? I can't think of a second meaning.

Another for your list: sanction.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
chandelle
2021-03-09 04:37:16 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by chandelle
Additions will be welcome and gratefully acknowledged, thanks.
Husband (noun) and husband (verb) have the same origin, so could be said
to be closely related in meaning. The duty of a husband (noun) is to
husband the house's resources.
Interesting, that. Thanks!
Post by Peter Moylan
Previous? I can't think of a second meaning.
'He returned the previous day' and 'Don't be too previous in making a choice'. Rather varied, what?
Peter Moylan
2021-03-09 04:49:50 UTC
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Post by chandelle
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by chandelle
Additions will be welcome and gratefully acknowledged, thanks.
Husband (noun) and husband (verb) have the same origin, so could be said
to be closely related in meaning. The duty of a husband (noun) is to
husband the house's resources.
Interesting, that. Thanks!
Post by Peter Moylan
Previous? I can't think of a second meaning.
'He returned the previous day' and 'Don't be too previous in making a choice'. Rather varied, what?
That second meaning is not part of my dialect, but I've heard of it
before on this newsgroup.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Ken Blake
2021-03-09 15:34:46 UTC
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Post by chandelle
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by chandelle
Additions will be welcome and gratefully acknowledged, thanks.
Husband (noun) and husband (verb) have the same origin, so could be said
to be closely related in meaning. The duty of a husband (noun) is to
husband the house's resources.
Interesting, that. Thanks!
Post by Peter Moylan
Previous? I can't think of a second meaning.
'He returned the previous day' and 'Don't be too previous in making a choice'. Rather varied, what?
Varied? I don't know, since I have no idea what "previous" is supposed
to mean in that second sentence. That's not an English usage of the
word, as far as I'm concerned.
--
Ken
Stefan Ram
2021-03-09 16:06:16 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by chandelle
'He returned the previous day' and 'Don't be too previous in
making a choice'. Rather varied, what?
Varied? I don't know, since I have no idea what "previous" is supposed
to mean in that second sentence. That's not an English usage of the
word, as far as I'm concerned.
According to one dictionary, there is an informal meaning of
"too soon", but it seems to be rare. This usually is preceded
by a modifier ("a bit", "too"). In recent TV shows, I find
three or four occurences of "bit previous" or "too previous",
all of which are starting with "bit".

|You might be a bit previous toasting the chef. (1999)
|Youse uh mite too previous for dat (1937)
|Don't get too previous, brother. (1928)
|[It was], in the slang of the Street, a little "too previous". (1902)
|It was a little previous to make this last announcement. (1869)
|This a bit previous, isn't it? (Lie to Me: Season 2, Episode 17)
Jerry Friedman
2021-03-09 04:40:38 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by chandelle
I'm thinking of drawing up a list - just for fun - of words that
have two meanings, neither of which remotely resembles the other, and
seek your inputs as well.
Three words that readily come to mind are: husband, previous and cashier.
Additions will be welcome and gratefully acknowledged, thanks.
Husband (noun) and husband (verb) have the same origin, so could be said
to be closely related in meaning. The duty of a husband (noun) is to
husband the house's resources.
Cashier is a good example of two words having different origins ending
up with the same spelling and pronunciation.
Saw, lie, mother (the meaning "slimy stuff produced in making vinegar" is unrelated
to the common meaning)

Does it have to be only two? "Fit" has three meanings. In the sense of "part of
a long poem", it's often spelled "fitt".

Do they have to have the same meaning, or are words such as "lead", "wind",
and "wound" allowed?
...
Post by Peter Moylan
Another for your list: sanction.
And Chandelle might like to look up "contronym".
--
Jerry Friedman
Stefan Ram
2021-03-09 04:49:31 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter Moylan
Another for your list: sanction.
And Chandelle might like to look up "contronym".
Or "autoantonym".
Peter Moylan
2021-03-09 04:50:59 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Saw, lie, mother (the meaning "slimy stuff produced in making vinegar" is unrelated
to the common meaning)
Librarian: I don't think /Advice for young mothers/ is suitable for you.
Young boy: Why? I collect moths.
--
Peter Moylan Newcastle, NSW http://www.pmoylan.org
Ken Blake
2021-03-09 15:38:54 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by chandelle
I'm thinking of drawing up a list - just for fun - of words that
have two meanings, neither of which remotely resembles the other, and
seek your inputs as well.
Three words that readily come to mind are: husband, previous and cashier.
Additions will be welcome and gratefully acknowledged, thanks.
Husband (noun) and husband (verb) have the same origin, so could be said
to be closely related in meaning. The duty of a husband (noun) is to
husband the house's resources.
Cashier is a good example of two words having different origins ending
up with the same spelling and pronunciation.
Saw, lie, mother (the meaning "slimy stuff produced in making vinegar" is unrelated
to the common meaning)
Does it have to be only two? "Fit" has three meanings. In the sense of "part of
a long poem", it's often spelled "fitt".
Do they have to have the same meaning, or are words such as "lead", "wind",
and "wound" allowed?
"Wound" reminds me of a guitar teacher I used to have. He was from the
Philippines. He spoke English very well, with no discernable accent, but
I remember his once talking about the "wound" strings on a guitar,
pronouncing it wooned.
--
Ken
musika
2021-03-09 16:23:04 UTC
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On 09/03/2021 15:38, Ken Blake wro
Post by Ken Blake
"Wound" reminds me of a guitar teacher I used to have. He was from
the Philippines. He spoke English very well, with no discernable
accent,
You mean he had an American accent? Everybody has an accent.
Post by Ken Blake
but > I remember his once talking about the "wound" strings on a
guitar, pronouncing it wooned.
--
Ray
UK
Ken Blake
2021-03-09 16:35:14 UTC
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Post by musika
On 09/03/2021 15:38, Ken Blake wro
Post by Ken Blake
"Wound" reminds me of a guitar teacher I used to have. He was from
the Philippines. He spoke English very well, with no discernable
accent,
You mean he had an American accent?
Yes.
Post by musika
Everybody has an accent.
Yes.

You can change that sentence to "He spoke English very well, with no
discernable accent that was different from mine."
Post by musika
Post by Ken Blake
but > I remember his once talking about the "wound" strings on a
guitar, pronouncing it wooned.
--
Ken
CDB
2021-03-09 14:37:41 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by chandelle
I'm thinking of drawing up a list - just for fun - of words that
have two meanings, neither of which remotely resembles the other,
and seek your inputs as well.
Three words that readily come to mind are: husband, previous and cashier.
Additions will be welcome and gratefully acknowledged, thanks.
Husband (noun) and husband (verb) have the same origin, so could be
said to be closely related in meaning. The duty of a husband (noun)
is to husband the house's resources.
Cashier is a good example of two words having different origins
ending up with the same spelling and pronunciation.
Previous? I can't think of a second meaning.
Another for your list: sanction.
Denier.
Jerry Friedman
2021-03-09 15:28:46 UTC
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Post by CDB
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by chandelle
I'm thinking of drawing up a list - just for fun - of words that
have two meanings, neither of which remotely resembles the other,
and seek your inputs as well.
Three words that readily come to mind are: husband, previous and cashier.
Additions will be welcome and gratefully acknowledged, thanks.
Husband (noun) and husband (verb) have the same origin, so could be
said to be closely related in meaning. The duty of a husband (noun)
is to husband the house's resources.
Cashier is a good example of two words having different origins
ending up with the same spelling and pronunciation.
Previous? I can't think of a second meaning.
Another for your list: sanction.
Denier.
Unionized.
--
Jerry Friedman
soup
2021-03-09 07:11:13 UTC
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Post by chandelle
I'm thinking of drawing up a list - just for fun - of words that have two meanings, neither of which remotely resembles the other, and seek your inputs as well.
Three words that readily come to mind are: husband, previous and cashier.
Additions will be welcome and gratefully acknowledged, thanks.
Many rather than two so not really fulfilling your requirements but I
thought I'd post it anyway.

'SET'
Rich Ulrich
2021-03-09 18:11:49 UTC
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Post by soup
Post by chandelle
I'm thinking of drawing up a list - just for fun - of words that have two meanings, neither of which remotely resembles the other, and seek your inputs as well.
Three words that readily come to mind are: husband, previous and cashier.
Additions will be welcome and gratefully acknowledged, thanks.
Many rather than two so not really fulfilling your requirements but I
thought I'd post it anyway.
'SET'
Here's a set - tire, wheel, auto, gas, trunk.
Firm. Plant. Dug.
--
Rich Ulrich
phil
2021-03-09 07:58:22 UTC
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Post by chandelle
I'm thinking of drawing up a list - just for fun - of words that have two meanings, neither of which remotely resembles the other, and seek your inputs as well.
Three words that readily come to mind are: husband, previous and cashier.
Additions will be welcome and gratefully acknowledged, thanks.
You could start with 'list'.
occam
2021-03-09 08:31:49 UTC
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Post by chandelle
I'm thinking of drawing up a list - just for fun - of words that have two meanings, neither of which remotely resembles the other, and seek your inputs as well.
Three words that readily come to mind are: husband, previous and cashier.
Additions will be welcome and gratefully acknowledged, thanks.
Can I recommend a joke book on puns, as a starting point? Granted, puns
rely on sounds and not spelling, but the source is there

'Clubbing' is what you do with friends, or to seals.
s***@my-deja.com
2021-03-09 16:50:59 UTC
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Post by chandelle
I'm thinking of drawing up a list - just for fun - of words that have two meanings,
neither of which remotely resembles the other, and seek your inputs as well.
bow
Jerry Friedman
2021-03-09 20:57:47 UTC
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Post by chandelle
I'm thinking of drawing up a list - just for fun - of words that have two meanings, neither of which remotely resembles the other, and seek your inputs as well.
Three words that readily come to mind are: husband, previous and cashier.
Additions will be welcome and gratefully acknowledged, thanks.
ball, bat, batter, battery, batting, bowl, bill, buff, bull, check, copper (is slang
allowed?), cue, date, ell, fine, fell, flag, gill, hawk, lean, mean, nag, page, quail,
rose, slug, stall, stable, tilt, wake, yen

I admit I'm getting help. I look at the tabs I have open, and one says "mail". I hear
a flicker calling outside.
--
Jerry Friedman
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