Discussion:
Fruitcake
(too old to reply)
David Kleinecke
2017-12-31 23:58:21 UTC
Permalink
Food is always on-topic at AUE:

This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.

I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake. I like both but
they are not the same.

What is going on here?
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-01-01 02:51:03 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake. I like both but
they are not the same.
What is going on here?
Dear Sir:

I believe you are the fruitcake.

Regards,
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
U.S. Army, ret.
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-01-01 08:26:30 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake.
It bears little resemblance to the fruitcake we used to eat when I were
a lad. Panettone has relatively little fruit in it, it dries out very
fast once opened, has very little icinf (and no marzipan) and is almost
white in colour. Fruitcake has lots of fruit in it, can last months
without getting stale, has lots of icing, and marzipan, and is dark in
colour.
Post by David Kleinecke
I like both but
they are not the same.
What is going on here?
--
athel
RH Draney
2018-01-01 09:23:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake.
It bears little resemblance to the fruitcake we used to eat when I were
a lad. Panettone has relatively little fruit in it, it dries out very
fast once opened, has very little icinf (and no marzipan) and is almost
white in colour. Fruitcake has lots of fruit in it, can last months
without getting stale, has lots of icing, and marzipan, and is dark in
colour.
Alternatively: it's cake, it has fruit in it, therefore it's fruitcake,
QED....

I used to have a girlfriend who didn't like fruitcake...I tried to
convert her, and managed to elicit "I might like it if there were more
cake and less fruit"...after a couple of false starts (stollen?) she
finally settled for panettone....r
Peter T. Daniels
2018-01-01 16:14:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake.
It bears little resemblance to the fruitcake we used to eat when I were
a lad. Panettone has relatively little fruit in it, it dries out very
fast once opened, has very little icinf (and no marzipan) and is almost
white in colour. Fruitcake has lots of fruit in it, can last months
without getting stale, has lots of icing, and marzipan, and is dark in
colour.
Fruitcake has neither icing nor marzipan.

That's like saying mince pie has suet and meat in it.
Tony Cooper
2018-01-01 16:37:49 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 1 Jan 2018 08:14:19 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake.
It bears little resemblance to the fruitcake we used to eat when I were
a lad. Panettone has relatively little fruit in it, it dries out very
fast once opened, has very little icinf (and no marzipan) and is almost
white in colour. Fruitcake has lots of fruit in it, can last months
without getting stale, has lots of icing, and marzipan, and is dark in
colour.
Fruitcake has neither icing nor marzipan.
That's like saying mince pie has suet and meat in it.
Once again, that cat has been swung in a NewJerseycentric arc.

The comment is about fruitcake eaten by a lad from the UK. British
fruitcake may have icing or marzipan icing. A quick Google shows many
recipes for this.

http://tinyurl.com/ychuz6rp or
https://www.etsy.com/listing/208478919/rich-traditional-british-fruit-cake-with?gpla=1&gao=1&utm_campaign=shopping_us_BakeDelights_sfc_osa&utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=google&utm_custom1=0&utm_content=10179039&gclid=Cj0KCQiA1afSBRD2ARIsAEvBsNnt-cU4bPBxiNt7GQCZ3l7Ke6wsXvUiDwrt301LlRkPpozpgHmfzCcaAroBEALw_wcB

The fruitcake *you* know about is not the worldwide standard.

It's not a problem that you don't know that not everything is as you
have experienced it, but that you make these categorical statements
that what you do know is what everyone must have experienced.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2018-01-01 16:45:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 1 Jan 2018 08:14:19 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake.
It bears little resemblance to the fruitcake we used to eat when I were
a lad. Panettone has relatively little fruit in it, it dries out very
fast once opened, has very little icinf (and no marzipan) and is almost
white in colour. Fruitcake has lots of fruit in it, can last months
without getting stale, has lots of icing, and marzipan, and is dark in
colour.
Fruitcake has neither icing nor marzipan.
That's like saying mince pie has suet and meat in it.
Once again, that cat has been swung in a NewJerseycentric arc.
The comment is about fruitcake eaten by a lad from the UK. British
fruitcake may have icing or marzipan icing. A quick Google shows many
recipes for this.
http://tinyurl.com/ychuz6rp or
https://www.etsy.com/listing/208478919/rich-traditional-british-fruit-cake-with?gpla=1&gao=1&utm_campaign=shopping_us_BakeDelights_sfc_osa&utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=google&utm_custom1=0&utm_content=10179039&gclid=Cj0KCQiA1afSBRD2ARIsAEvBsNnt-cU4bPBxiNt7GQCZ3l7Ke6wsXvUiDwrt301LlRkPpozpgHmfzCcaAroBEALw_wcB
The fruitcake *you* know about is not the worldwide standard.
It's not a problem that you don't know that not everything is as you
have experienced it, but that you make these categorical statements
that what you do know is what everyone must have experienced.
Thanks, Tony. You've said everything I was thinking.
--
athel
Peter T. Daniels
2018-01-01 16:54:04 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Thanks, Tony. You've said everything I was thinking.
A sum total of zero, then.
Peter T. Daniels
2018-01-01 16:47:51 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
On Mon, 1 Jan 2018 08:14:19 -0800 (PST), "Peter T. Daniels"
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake.
It bears little resemblance to the fruitcake we used to eat when I were
a lad. Panettone has relatively little fruit in it, it dries out very
fast once opened, has very little icinf (and no marzipan) and is almost
white in colour. Fruitcake has lots of fruit in it, can last months
without getting stale, has lots of icing, and marzipan, and is dark in
colour.
Fruitcake has neither icing nor marzipan.
That's like saying mince pie has suet and meat in it.
The comment is about fruitcake eaten by a lad from the UK. British
fruitcake may have icing or marzipan icing. A quick Google shows many
recipes for this.
http://tinyurl.com/ychuz6rp or
https://www.etsy.com/listing/208478919/rich-traditional-british-fruit-cake-with?gpla=1&gao=1&utm_campaign=shopping_us_BakeDelights_sfc_osa&utm_medium=cpc&utm_source=google&utm_custom1=0&utm_content=10179039&gclid=Cj0KCQiA1afSBRD2ARIsAEvBsNnt-cU4bPBxiNt7GQCZ3l7Ke6wsXvUiDwrt301LlRkPpozpgHmfzCcaAroBEALw_wcB
The fruitcake *you* know about is not the worldwide standard.
For gods' sake. How stupid can you be?
Post by Tony Cooper
It's not a problem that you don't know that not everything is as you
have experienced it, but that you make these categorical statements
that what you do know is what everyone must have experienced.
And you don't, hypocrite????

Everyone here knows which culture I represent when I say such things.

Great way to start the new year.
John Varela
2018-01-01 17:24:58 UTC
Permalink
On Mon, 1 Jan 2018 08:26:30 UTC, Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake.
It bears little resemblance to the fruitcake we used to eat when I were
a lad. Panettone has relatively little fruit in it, it dries out very
fast once opened, has very little icinf (and no marzipan) and is almost
white in colour. Fruitcake has lots of fruit in it, can last months
without getting stale, has lots of icing, and marzipan, and is dark in
colour.
No icing, no marzipan, lots of glazed fruit and pecans, and comes
either as "regular" or dark. I prefer regular.

claxtonfruitcake.com

This product first appeared in this area (DC 'burbs) a few years
ago, placed in hardware stores, filling stations, laundries, and the
like at holiday time by the Lions Club, for the benefit of their
charities. It proved popular and now is sold in regular supermarkets
for profit.

Claxton fruitcakes are like what I remember from childhood. I
disliked fruitcake as a child, but now every year I look forward to
it. We have one grandchild and her mother (our ex-daughter-in-law)
who share my enthusiasm. And since the ex-daughter-in-law lives in
South Carolina and the granddaughter is in California, I don't have
to share. Yum.
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by David Kleinecke
I like both but
they are not the same.
What is going on here?
--
John Varela
Lewis
2018-01-01 17:39:47 UTC
Permalink
Post by Athel Cornish-Bowden
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake.
It bears little resemblance to the fruitcake we used to eat when I were
a lad. Panettone has relatively little fruit in it, it dries out very
fast once opened, has very little icinf (and no marzipan) and is almost
white in colour. Fruitcake has lots of fruit in it, can last months
without getting stale, has lots of icing, and marzipan, and is dark in
colour.
Fruitcake encompasses a wide range of cakes.

The cakes I make have little fruit, but the key fruitcake ingredient is
candied orange peel, which is difficult to make and takes several days.
We've tried to find a workable substitute we can buy, but all the
commercial varieties are vile, rubbery, and over sweetened with large
sugar crystals.

Making the peels involves a cycle of simmering for 30 minutes, then
soaking in cold water for 6 hours, then simmering for 30 minutes for a
total of six cycles)

The cake recipe includes butter, eggs, sugar (brown), as well as
Guinness (or another dark stout/porter), currants, golden raisins, and
some spices.

Getting good currants and golden raisins is also tricky, most are
heavily sugared.

But the key ingredient is the candied orange peel.
--
'But you ain't part of it, are you?' said Granny conversationally. 'You
try, but you always find yourself watchin' yourself watchin' people, eh?
Never quite believin' anything? Thinkin' the wrong thoughts?'
Cheryl
2018-01-01 14:48:19 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake. I like both but
they are not the same.
What is going on here?
Utter heresy. There are two varieties of fruitcake - light and dark -
and I have consumed some of the dark over Christmas (I prefer the light,
but didn't get any). It hasn't changed since previous Christmases, and
isn't the same thing as panetone.
--
Cheryl

---
This email has been checked for viruses by Avast antivirus software.
https://www.avast.com/antivirus
Janet
2018-01-01 14:55:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Cheryl
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake. I like both but
they are not the same.
What is going on here?
Utter heresy. There are two varieties of fruitcake - light and dark -
and I have consumed some of the dark over Christmas (I prefer the light,
but didn't get any). It hasn't changed since previous Christmases, and
isn't the same thing as panetone.
We prefer the kind of fruitcake where no cake is visible between the
fruit.

Janet.
Jerry Friedman
2018-01-01 15:41:17 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janet
Post by Cheryl
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake. I like both but
they are not the same.
What is going on here?
Utter heresy. There are two varieties of fruitcake - light and dark -
and I have consumed some of the dark over Christmas (I prefer the light,
but didn't get any). It hasn't changed since previous Christmases, and
isn't the same thing as panetone.
We prefer the kind of fruitcake where no cake is visible between the
fruit.
Fruit salad? Trail mix?

(Okay, I admit that though my experience of fruitcakes is extremely
limited, I know what you mean.)
--
Jerry Friedman
charles
2018-01-01 16:06:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Janet
Post by Cheryl
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes". But they
were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather they were more or
less the Italian sweet bread called panetone but baked in the shape
of old-fashioned fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake. I like both but they
are not the same.
What is going on here?
Utter heresy. There are two varieties of fruitcake - light and dark -
and I have consumed some of the dark over Christmas (I prefer the
light, but didn't get any). It hasn't changed since previous
Christmases, and isn't the same thing as panetone.
We prefer the kind of fruitcake where no cake is visible between the
fruit.
Fruit salad? Trail mix?
(Okay, I admit that though my experience of fruitcakes is extremely
limited, I know what you mean.)
geta proper UK Christmas Cake - they are sold my mail order.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
HVS
2018-01-01 16:35:02 UTC
Permalink
On 01 Jan 2018, Jerry Friedman wrote

-snip-
Post by Jerry Friedman
(Okay, I admit that though my experience of fruitcakes is extremely
limited, I know what you mean.)
Huh. You read Usenet, so you've got extensive experience of fruitcakes.
--
Cheers, Harvey
CanEng (30yrs) and BrEng (34yrs), indiscriminately mixed
John Varela
2018-01-01 17:26:43 UTC
Permalink
Post by Janet
Post by Cheryl
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake. I like both but
they are not the same.
What is going on here?
Utter heresy. There are two varieties of fruitcake - light and dark -
and I have consumed some of the dark over Christmas (I prefer the light,
but didn't get any). It hasn't changed since previous Christmases, and
isn't the same thing as panetone.
We prefer the kind of fruitcake where no cake is visible between the
fruit.
That's not authentic. If you like that, you are probably the kind of
person who eats pizza with pineapple on it.
--
John Varela
the Omrud
2018-01-01 16:18:52 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake. I like both but
they are not the same.
What is going on here?
obAUE: I'm having a real problem with all this "fruitcake". In MyE,
that's an adjective meaning bonkers or looney. The delicious stuff we
have at weddings and Christmas is fruit cake.
--
David
Peter T. Daniels
2018-01-01 16:45:12 UTC
Permalink
Post by the Omrud
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake. I like both but
they are not the same.
What is going on here?
obAUE: I'm having a real problem with all this "fruitcake". In MyE,
that's an adjective meaning bonkers or looney. The delicious stuff we
have at weddings and Christmas is fruit cake.
Clipped from "nutty as a fruitcake."

When I was little I didn't much like nuts and felt cheated when they turned up inside a fruitcake
taking up space that should have belonged to candied fruit pieces.
Katy Jennison
2018-01-01 16:56:34 UTC
Permalink
Post by David Kleinecke
This Xmas season we got two almost identical "fruitcakes".
But they were not what we used to call fruitcakes. Rather
they were more or less the Italian sweet bread called
panetone but baked in the shape of old-fashioned
fruitcakes.
I like panetone but it is IMO not fruitcake. I like both but
they are not the same.
What is going on here?
obAUE: I'm having a real problem with all this "fruitcake".  In MyE,
that's an adjective meaning bonkers or looney.  The delicious stuff we
have at weddings and Christmas is fruit cake.
+1. (And that isn't panettone, either.)
--
Katy Jennison
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