Discussion:
"pickle"
(too old to reply)
Stefan Ram
2019-01-15 04:24:02 UTC
Permalink
(Post contains words for body parts that might be deemed indecent.)

According to the dictionary, a "pickle" is:

|1. (often plural)
|vegetables, such as cauliflowers, onions, etc, preserved in
|vinegar, brine, etc
...
|4. mainly US and Canadian
|a cucumber that has been preserved and flavoured in a
|pickling solution, such as brine or vinegar

. It seems to me that the meaning 4 is very common,
especially when the word is used the singular "a pickle";
possibly up to the point, where it actually has become the
main meaning (meaning 1) of the word.

(That dictionary does not mention another meaning of "pickle"
["his pickle"] that, however, can be found in the urban dictionary.)
Athel Cornish-Bowden
2019-01-15 07:00:21 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
(Post contains words for body parts that might be deemed indecent.)
Only by an extreme prude such as yourself.
Post by Stefan Ram
|1. (often plural)
|vegetables, such as cauliflowers, onions, etc, preserved in
|vinegar, brine, etc
...
|4. mainly US and Canadian
|a cucumber that has been preserved and flavoured in a
|pickling solution, such as brine or vinegar
. It seems to me that the meaning 4 is very common,
especially when the word is used the singular "a pickle";
possibly up to the point, where it actually has become the
main meaning (meaning 1) of the word.
(That dictionary does not mention another meaning of "pickle"
["his pickle"] that, however, can be found in the urban dictionary.)
--
athel
CDB
2019-01-15 08:53:10 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
(Post contains words for body parts that might be deemed indecent.)
|1. (often plural) |vegetables, such as cauliflowers, onions, etc,
preserved in |vinegar, brine, etc ... |4. mainly US and Canadian |a
cucumber that has been preserved and flavoured in a |pickling
solution, such as brine or vinegar
. It seems to me that the meaning 4 is very common, especially when
the word is used the singular "a pickle"; possibly up to the point,
where it actually has become the main meaning (meaning 1) of the
word.
(That dictionary does not mention another meaning of "pickle" ["his
pickle"] that, however, can be found in the urban dictionary.)
Here's another fine pickle you've got us into.
--
of herbs and other country messes. Oops.
Jerry Friedman
2019-01-16 01:30:11 UTC
Permalink
Post by Stefan Ram
(Post contains words for body parts that might be deemed indecent.)
Not to worry.
Post by Stefan Ram
|1. (often plural)
|vegetables, such as cauliflowers, onions, etc, preserved in
|vinegar, brine, etc
...
|4. mainly US and Canadian
|a cucumber that has been preserved and flavoured in a
|pickling solution, such as brine or vinegar
. It seems to me that the meaning 4 is very common,
especially when the word is used the singular "a pickle";
possibly up to the point, where it actually has become the
main meaning (meaning 1) of the word.
Everywhere this American has lived, that's been almost the only meaning
of the noun.

As for "main meaning", if your dictionary is British, as would be
consistent with "flavoured", it wouldn't list a mainly North American
meaning as the main one. Also, not all dictionaries put the most common
modern meaning first.
Post by Stefan Ram
(That dictionary does not mention another meaning of "pickle"
["his pickle"] that, however, can be found in the urban dictionary.)
If it isn't obvious.
--
Jerry Friedman
Sam Plusnet
2019-01-16 21:16:50 UTC
Permalink
Post by Jerry Friedman
   (Post contains words for body parts that might be deemed indecent.)
Not to worry.
|1. (often plural)
|vegetables, such as cauliflowers, onions, etc, preserved in
|vinegar, brine, etc
...
|4. mainly US and Canadian
|a cucumber that has been preserved and flavoured in a
|pickling solution, such as brine or vinegar
   . It seems to me that the meaning 4 is very common,
   especially when the word is used the singular "a pickle";
   possibly up to the point, where it actually has become the
   main meaning (meaning 1) of the word.
Everywhere this American has lived, that's been almost the only meaning
of the noun.
As for "main meaning", if your dictionary is British, as would be
consistent with "flavoured", it wouldn't list a mainly North American
meaning as the main one.  Also, not all dictionaries put the most common
modern meaning first.
   (That dictionary does not mention another meaning of "pickle"
   ["his pickle"] that, however, can be found in the urban dictionary.)
If it isn't obvious.
I'm sure this has all been done before, but to this BrE speaker the
words "a pickle" would only be used of a tricky, Laurel & Hardy type
situation.
It certainly wouldn't refer to a cucumber in any state.
--
Sam Plusnet
Katy Jennison
2019-01-16 21:26:00 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
   (Post contains words for body parts that might be deemed indecent.)
Not to worry.
|1. (often plural)
|vegetables, such as cauliflowers, onions, etc, preserved in
|vinegar, brine, etc
...
|4. mainly US and Canadian
|a cucumber that has been preserved and flavoured in a
|pickling solution, such as brine or vinegar
   . It seems to me that the meaning 4 is very common,
   especially when the word is used the singular "a pickle";
   possibly up to the point, where it actually has become the
   main meaning (meaning 1) of the word.
Everywhere this American has lived, that's been almost the only
meaning of the noun.
As for "main meaning", if your dictionary is British, as would be
consistent with "flavoured", it wouldn't list a mainly North American
meaning as the main one.  Also, not all dictionaries put the most
common modern meaning first.
   (That dictionary does not mention another meaning of "pickle"
   ["his pickle"] that, however, can be found in the urban dictionary.)
If it isn't obvious.
I'm sure this has all been done before, but to this BrE speaker the
words "a pickle" would only be used of a tricky, Laurel & Hardy type
situation.
It certainly wouldn't refer to a cucumber in any state.
Branston pickle?
--
Katy Jennison
charles
2019-01-16 21:31:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Stefan Ram
(Post contains words for body parts that might be deemed indecent.)
Not to worry.
Post by Stefan Ram
|1. (often plural)
|vegetables, such as cauliflowers, onions, etc, preserved in
|vinegar, brine, etc
...
|4. mainly US and Canadian
|a cucumber that has been preserved and flavoured in a
|pickling solution, such as brine or vinegar
. It seems to me that the meaning 4 is very common,
especially when the word is used the singular "a pickle";
possibly up to the point, where it actually has become the
main meaning (meaning 1) of the word.
Everywhere this American has lived, that's been almost the only
meaning of the noun.
As for "main meaning", if your dictionary is British, as would be
consistent with "flavoured", it wouldn't list a mainly North American
meaning as the main one. Also, not all dictionaries put the most
common modern meaning first.
Post by Stefan Ram
(That dictionary does not mention another meaning of "pickle"
["his pickle"] that, however, can be found in the urban dictionary.)
If it isn't obvious.
I'm sure this has all been done before, but to this BrE speaker the
words "a pickle" would only be used of a tricky, Laurel & Hardy type
situation.
It certainly wouldn't refer to a cucumber in any state.
Branston pickle?
That's "pickle" not "a pickle".
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
Peter Moylan
2019-01-17 02:48:23 UTC
Permalink
Post by Katy Jennison
Post by Sam Plusnet
I'm sure this has all been done before, but to this BrE speaker
the words "a pickle" would only be used of a tricky, Laurel &
Hardy type situation. It certainly wouldn't refer to a cucumber in
any state.
Branston pickle?
Here we can buy pickles in jars, for uses such as spreading on
sandwiches, but I suspect that cucumbers are not included in the list of
ingredients.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Tony Cooper
2019-01-16 21:29:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
   (Post contains words for body parts that might be deemed indecent.)
Not to worry.
|1. (often plural)
|vegetables, such as cauliflowers, onions, etc, preserved in
|vinegar, brine, etc
...
|4. mainly US and Canadian
|a cucumber that has been preserved and flavoured in a
|pickling solution, such as brine or vinegar
   . It seems to me that the meaning 4 is very common,
   especially when the word is used the singular "a pickle";
   possibly up to the point, where it actually has become the
   main meaning (meaning 1) of the word.
Everywhere this American has lived, that's been almost the only meaning
of the noun.
As for "main meaning", if your dictionary is British, as would be
consistent with "flavoured", it wouldn't list a mainly North American
meaning as the main one.  Also, not all dictionaries put the most common
modern meaning first.
   (That dictionary does not mention another meaning of "pickle"
   ["his pickle"] that, however, can be found in the urban dictionary.)
If it isn't obvious.
I'm sure this has all been done before, but to this BrE speaker the
words "a pickle" would only be used of a tricky, Laurel & Hardy type
situation.
It certainly wouldn't refer to a cucumber in any state.
I know the cucumber meaning, and the tricky situation meaning, but
also the baseball meaning. In baseball, when a baserunner is between
bases and being run down by two basemen, that's called a pickle.

It's usually the result of a baserunner attempting to steal a base,
but it can happen after the catch of a fly ball or after a hit that
forces a player to advance to the next base.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Jerry Friedman
2019-01-16 21:32:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
   (Post contains words for body parts that might be deemed indecent.)
Not to worry.
|1. (often plural)
|vegetables, such as cauliflowers, onions, etc, preserved in
|vinegar, brine, etc
...
|4. mainly US and Canadian
|a cucumber that has been preserved and flavoured in a
|pickling solution, such as brine or vinegar
   . It seems to me that the meaning 4 is very common,
   especially when the word is used the singular "a pickle";
   possibly up to the point, where it actually has become the
   main meaning (meaning 1) of the word.
Everywhere this American has lived, that's been almost the only meaning
of the noun.
As for "main meaning", if your dictionary is British, as would be
consistent with "flavoured", it wouldn't list a mainly North American
meaning as the main one.  Also, not all dictionaries put the most common
modern meaning first.
   (That dictionary does not mention another meaning of "pickle"
   ["his pickle"] that, however, can be found in the urban dictionary.)
If it isn't obvious.
I'm sure this has all been done before, but to this BrE speaker the
words "a pickle" would only be used of a tricky, Laurel & Hardy type
situation.
It certainly wouldn't refer to a cucumber in any state.
I know the cucumber meaning, and the tricky situation meaning, but
also the baseball meaning. In baseball, when a baserunner is between
bases and being run down by two basemen, that's called a pickle.
It's usually the result of a baserunner attempting to steal a base,
but it can happen after the catch of a fly ball or after a hit that
forces a player to advance to the next base.
I wonder whether this is connected to the reason that in my childhood
we knew the game of Keep-away as Pickle in the Middle. (Two kids
have a ball and throw it back and forth while a third stands between
them and tries to intercept it. If he (it was usually "he") does, he
changes places with the thrower.) It's not the same "in a pickle",
but it does have one player between two opponents.
--
Jerry Friedman
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-01-16 21:42:42 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 16 Jan 2019 21:32:53 GMT, Jerry Friedman
Post by Stefan Ram
   (Post contains words for body parts that might be deemed
indecent.)
[indecent use of pickle to refer to preserved vegeatable omitted]
Post by Stefan Ram
I wonder whether this is connected to the reason that in my childhood
we knew the game of Keep-away as Pickle in the Middle. (Two kids
have a ball and throw it back and forth while a third stands between
them and tries to intercept it. If he (it was usually "he") does, he
changes places with the thrower.) It's not the same "in a pickle",
but it does have one player between two opponents.
In BrE (or at least where I grew up) it is/was Piggy in the Middle.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
Mark Brader
2019-01-17 01:01:45 UTC
Permalink
Post by Tony Cooper
I know the cucumber meaning, and the tricky situation meaning, but
also the baseball meaning. In baseball, when a baserunner is between
bases and being run down by two basemen, that's called a pickle.
I thought it was called a rundown.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | Typos are a journalistic tradition of long
***@vex.net | etaoin shrdlu. -- Truly Donovan
bill van
2019-01-17 01:39:16 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
I know the cucumber meaning, and the tricky situation meaning, but
also the baseball meaning. In baseball, when a baserunner is between
bases and being run down by two basemen, that's called a pickle.
I thought it was called a rundown.
That's what I've always heard it called. But Wikip agrees that it is
"informally
called a pickle or a hotbox".

bill
Tony Cooper
2019-01-17 01:49:29 UTC
Permalink
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
I know the cucumber meaning, and the tricky situation meaning, but
also the baseball meaning. In baseball, when a baserunner is between
bases and being run down by two basemen, that's called a pickle.
I thought it was called a rundown.
It is. It's also called "a pickle".

From Wiki: A rundown, informally known as a pickle or the hotbox, is
a situation in the game of baseball that occurs when the baserunner is
stranded between two bases, also known as no-man's land, and is in
jeopardy of being tagged out.

It's not unusual for something to be known by more than one term.

With a catcher and a first baseman in the family, pickles are not at
all uncommon for me to see. When a baserunner on first is attempting
to steal, the catcher often pegs it to first and sometimes the runner
is caught in pickle between first and second.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Tony Cooper
2019-01-17 04:52:37 UTC
Permalink
On Wed, 16 Jan 2019 20:49:29 -0500, Tony Cooper
Post by Tony Cooper
Post by Mark Brader
Post by Tony Cooper
I know the cucumber meaning, and the tricky situation meaning, but
also the baseball meaning. In baseball, when a baserunner is between
bases and being run down by two basemen, that's called a pickle.
I thought it was called a rundown.
It is. It's also called "a pickle".
From Wiki: A rundown, informally known as a pickle or the hotbox, is
a situation in the game of baseball that occurs when the baserunner is
stranded between two bases, also known as no-man's land, and is in
jeopardy of being tagged out.
It's not unusual for something to be known by more than one term.
With a catcher and a first baseman in the family, pickles are not at
all uncommon for me to see. When a baserunner on first is attempting
to steal, the catcher often pegs it to first and sometimes the runner
is caught in pickle between first and second.
I just noticed that no less than _Vanity Fair_ has used "pickle" with
either the "in a bind" or "baseball" meanings in what might be a mixed
metaphor:


"Complicating matters is the shutdown, which has consumed Trump’s
attention. A prominent Republican close to the White House told me
that Trump is essentially winging it when it comes to shutdown talks
with Democrats. “People are looking around asking, ‘What’s the play
call?’” the Republican said. “He’s calling plays from the line of
scrimmage.” “This was not played well. He’s in a pickle now, and I
don’t see a way out.”


Plays are called from the "line of scrimmage" in football but from the
dugout or by a base coach in baseball. However, describing Trump
being "in a pickle" does suggest the baseball meaning of trapped
between opposing players.
--
Tony Cooper - Orlando, Florida
Kerr-Mudd,John
2019-01-16 21:40:46 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
   (Post contains words for body parts that might be deemed
indecent.)
Not to worry.
|1. (often plural)
|vegetables, such as cauliflowers, onions, etc, preserved in
|vinegar, brine, etc
...
|4. mainly US and Canadian
|a cucumber that has been preserved and flavoured in a
|pickling solution, such as brine or vinegar
   . It seems to me that the meaning 4 is very common,
   especially when the word is used the singular "a pickle";
   possibly up to the point, where it actually has become the
   main meaning (meaning 1) of the word.
Everywhere this American has lived, that's been almost the only
meaning of the noun.
As for "main meaning", if your dictionary is British, as would be
consistent with "flavoured", it wouldn't list a mainly North American
meaning as the main one.  Also, not all dictionaries put the most
common modern meaning first.
   (That dictionary does not mention another meaning of "pickle"
   ["his pickle"] that, however, can be found in the urban
dictionary.)
If it isn't obvious.
I'm sure this has all been done before, but to this BrE speaker the
words "a pickle" would only be used of a tricky, Laurel & Hardy type
situation.
It certainly wouldn't refer to a cucumber in any state.
That would be another fine gherkin.
--
Bah, and indeed, Humbug.
bill van
2019-01-17 01:40:31 UTC
Permalink
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
   (Post contains words for body parts that might be deemed indecent.)
Not to worry.
|1. (often plural)
|vegetables, such as cauliflowers, onions, etc, preserved in
|vinegar, brine, etc
...
|4. mainly US and Canadian
|a cucumber that has been preserved and flavoured in a
|pickling solution, such as brine or vinegar
   . It seems to me that the meaning 4 is very common,
   especially when the word is used the singular "a pickle";
   possibly up to the point, where it actually has become the
   main meaning (meaning 1) of the word.
Everywhere this American has lived, that's been almost the only meaning
of the noun.
As for "main meaning", if your dictionary is British, as would be
consistent with "flavoured", it wouldn't list a mainly North American
meaning as the main one.  Also, not all dictionaries put the most
common modern meaning first.
   (That dictionary does not mention another meaning of "pickle"
   ["his pickle"] that, however, can be found in the urban dictionary.)
If it isn't obvious.
I'm sure this has all been done before, but to this BrE speaker the
words "a pickle" would only be used of a tricky, Laurel & Hardy type
situation.
It certainly wouldn't refer to a cucumber in any state.
While we're at it, can you buy jars of cucumbers in Britain that have
been preserved
in vinegar, brine, etc? If so, what do you call those cucumbers?

bill
Peter Moylan
2019-01-17 02:49:53 UTC
Permalink
Post by bill van
While we're at it, can you buy jars of cucumbers in Britain that have
been preserved in vinegar, brine, etc? If so, what do you call those
cucumbers?
Gherkins.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
bill van
2019-01-17 05:02:58 UTC
Permalink
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by bill van
While we're at it, can you buy jars of cucumbers in Britain that have
been preserved in vinegar, brine, etc? If so, what do you call those
cucumbers?
Gherkins.
Ah. We have gherkins here, but they are tiny little wrinkled units, no
more than two inches long,
and a bit sweeter than what we call dill pickles: full-sized cukes
pickled with dill
and usually garlic. Everything else I can think of in the same category
is called "pickled (fill in the blank)".

Uh, I fully understand this is a food thread and that things have
different names
in other places. I hope the rest of youse will be as understanding.

bill

Sam Plusnet
2019-01-17 02:53:38 UTC
Permalink
Post by bill van
Post by Sam Plusnet
Post by Jerry Friedman
   (Post contains words for body parts that might be deemed indecent.)
Not to worry.
|1. (often plural)
|vegetables, such as cauliflowers, onions, etc, preserved in
|vinegar, brine, etc
...
|4. mainly US and Canadian
|a cucumber that has been preserved and flavoured in a
|pickling solution, such as brine or vinegar
   . It seems to me that the meaning 4 is very common,
   especially when the word is used the singular "a pickle";
   possibly up to the point, where it actually has become the
   main meaning (meaning 1) of the word.
Everywhere this American has lived, that's been almost the only
meaning of the noun.
As for "main meaning", if your dictionary is British, as would be
consistent with "flavoured", it wouldn't list a mainly North American
meaning as the main one.  Also, not all dictionaries put the most
common modern meaning first.
   (That dictionary does not mention another meaning of "pickle"
   ["his pickle"] that, however, can be found in the urban dictionary.)
If it isn't obvious.
I'm sure this has all been done before, but to this BrE speaker the
words "a pickle" would only be used of a tricky, Laurel & Hardy type
situation.
It certainly wouldn't refer to a cucumber in any state.
While we're at it, can you buy jars of cucumbers in Britain that have
been preserved
in vinegar, brine, etc? If so, what do you call those cucumbers?
Oh we can & do buy pickles (even Pickalilli), but that definition where
"a pickle" equates to specifically to

"a cucumber that has been preserved and flavoured in a pickling
solution, such as brine or vinegar"

Doesn't work here.

In the UK they would usually be called pickled gherkins.
--
Sam Plusnet
Loading...