Discussion:
Compound words easier in other Germanic languages
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Dingbat
2019-12-01 06:54:37 UTC
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Making compound words easier in other Germanic languages than in English?

Consider FLYGSKAM and FLYGFRITT in Swedish.
FLYGSKAM = shame one feels at harming the environment by air travel.
FLYGFRITT = avoidance of air travel
https://www.vox.com/the-highlight/2019/7/25/8881364/greta-thunberg-climate-change-flying-airline

FLIGHTSHAME and FLIGHTFREE would accurately translate the morphemes
to English but look like odd compound words despite English having
the word FLIGHTLESS. Erica Jong's book title FEAR OF FLYING would
look odd, albeit punny, if changed to FLIGHTFRIGHT.

OTOH, it seems easier to make compound words in English than in French,
so if compound words are a good thing, English isn't the worst at
making them.
Quinn C
2019-12-02 01:18:29 UTC
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Post by Dingbat
Making compound words easier in other Germanic languages than in English?
Consider FLYGSKAM and FLYGFRITT in Swedish.
FLYGSKAM = shame one feels at harming the environment by air travel.
FLYGFRITT = avoidance of air travel
https://www.vox.com/the-highlight/2019/7/25/8881364/greta-thunberg-climate-change-flying-airline
FLIGHTSHAME and FLIGHTFREE would accurately translate the morphemes
to English but look like odd compound words despite English having
the word FLIGHTLESS. Erica Jong's book title FEAR OF FLYING would
look odd, albeit punny, if changed to FLIGHTFRIGHT.
While the fear of using airplanes is "Flugangst" in German, Jong's book
was published as "Angst vorm Fliegen". I guess they didn't want people
to think it's a travel advice book.

The same seems to be true for the Swedish edition. The Dutch and Danish
translations seem to have had completely different titles, if I'm
reading Wikipedia right.
--
Quinn C
My pronouns are they/them
(or other gender-neutral ones)
Anders D. Nygaard
2019-12-02 17:34:22 UTC
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Post by Quinn C
Post by Dingbat
Making compound words easier in other Germanic languages than in English?
Consider FLYGSKAM and FLYGFRITT in Swedish.
FLYGSKAM = shame one feels at harming the environment by air travel.
FLYGFRITT = avoidance of air travel
https://www.vox.com/the-highlight/2019/7/25/8881364/greta-thunberg-climate-change-flying-airline
FLIGHTSHAME and FLIGHTFREE would accurately translate the morphemes
to English but look like odd compound words despite English having
the word FLIGHTLESS. Erica Jong's book title FEAR OF FLYING would
look odd, albeit punny, if changed to FLIGHTFRIGHT.
While the fear of using airplanes is "Flugangst" in German, Jong's book
was published as "Angst vorm Fliegen". I guess they didn't want people
to think it's a travel advice book.
The same seems to be true for the Swedish edition. The Dutch and Danish
translations seem to have had completely different titles, if I'm
reading Wikipedia right.
The Danish title is "luft under vingerne", which suggests "free at last"
(lit: "air under the wings" or, more idiomatically, "airborne").
Rather the opposite of the English title, I'd say.

/Anders, Denmark.

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