Discussion:
IS or ARE?
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Pamela
2020-01-13 03:40:42 UTC
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Which of these two sentences is correct? The capitals are used only to
identify the words in question.

"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years ARE the results of his blood tests."

"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years IS the results of his blood tests."
Stefan Ram
2020-01-13 03:49:00 UTC
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Post by Pamela
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years ARE the results of his blood tests."
Shriek! Run-on sentence!
Jerry Friedman
2020-01-13 04:07:01 UTC
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Post by Pamela
Which of these two sentences is correct? The capitals are used only to
identify the words in question.
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years ARE the results of his blood tests."
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years IS the results of his blood tests."
"One is", in standard grammar.

I don't mind the use of a singular subject of "is" with a plural
complement, "one is the results", but some do.
--
Jerry Friedman
Pamela
2020-01-13 12:34:51 UTC
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Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Pamela
Which of these two sentences is correct? The capitals are used only to
identify the words in question.
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years ARE the results of his blood tests."
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years IS the results of his blood tests."
"One is", in standard grammar.
I don't mind the use of a singular subject of "is" with a plural
complement, "one is the results", but some do.
Couldn't the "ARE" apply to "results" as shown in the first example below?

I've used [*] to indicate a logical break.

"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years [*] ARE the results of his blood tests."

"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years IS [*] the results of his blood tests."
Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-13 14:33:47 UTC
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Post by Pamela
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Pamela
Which of these two sentences is correct? The capitals are used only to
identify the words in question.
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years ARE the results of his blood tests."
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years IS the results of his blood tests."
"One is", in standard grammar.
I don't mind the use of a singular subject of "is" with a plural
complement, "one is the results", but some do.
Couldn't the "ARE" apply to "results" as shown in the first example below?
No.
Post by Pamela
I've used [*] to indicate a logical break.
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years [*] ARE the results of his blood tests."
I don't know what a "logical break" may be, but there is no "break" there.
The subject of "are" is "one." You can't get much more singular than "one,"
can you?

In English, the verb agrees with the subject, not the complement.
Post by Pamela
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years IS [*] the results of his blood tests."
Peter Moylan
2020-01-13 14:45:01 UTC
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Post by Pamela
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Pamela
Which of these two sentences is correct? The capitals are used
only to identify the words in question.
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and
one he has asked about in recent years ARE the results of his
blood tests."
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and
one he has asked about in recent years IS the results of his
blood tests."
"One is", in standard grammar.
I don't mind the use of a singular subject of "is" with a plural
complement, "one is the results", but some do.
Couldn't the "ARE" apply to "results" as shown in the first example below?
Yes, provided that you revise the sentence to say "the results are". But
if your example says "one he has asked about" then the only possible
verb is "is", to agree with "one".

Stefan mentioned run-on sentences. I agree with him. The original
sentence is really two sentences, joined for no good reason.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Pamela
2020-01-14 11:44:44 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Pamela
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Pamela
Which of these two sentences is correct? The capitals are used
only to identify the words in question.
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and
one he has asked about in recent years ARE the results of his
blood tests."
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and
one he has asked about in recent years IS the results of his
blood tests."
"One is", in standard grammar.
I don't mind the use of a singular subject of "is" with a plural
complement, "one is the results", but some do.
Couldn't the "ARE" apply to "results" as shown in the first example below?
Yes, provided that you revise the sentence to say "the results are". But
if your example says "one he has asked about" then the only possible
verb is "is", to agree with "one".
Stefan mentioned run-on sentences. I agree with him. The original
sentence is really two sentences, joined for no good reason.
They are possible two sentences but is that wrong?

Joining them serves to connect their common idea. The text before and after
deals with a somewhat separate matter.
Pamela
2020-01-14 11:45:25 UTC
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Post by Pamela
Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Pamela
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Pamela
Which of these two sentences is correct? The capitals are used
only to identify the words in question.
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and
one he has asked about in recent years ARE the results of his
blood tests."
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and
one he has asked about in recent years IS the results of his
blood tests."
"One is", in standard grammar.
I don't mind the use of a singular subject of "is" with a plural
complement, "one is the results", but some do.
Couldn't the "ARE" apply to "results" as shown in the first example below?
Yes, provided that you revise the sentence to say "the results are".
But if your example says "one he has asked about" then the only
possible verb is "is", to agree with "one".
Stefan mentioned run-on sentences. I agree with him. The original
sentence is really two sentences, joined for no good reason.
They are possible two sentences but is that wrong?
Joining them serves to connect their common idea. The text before and
after deals with a somewhat separate matter.
possible = possibly
Stefan Ram
2020-01-14 12:40:39 UTC
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Post by Pamela
Joining them serves to connect their common idea. The text before and after
deals with a somewhat separate matter.
The usual guidelines recommend to join main clauses with a semicolon.

When a comma is used instead, that's an error called a "comma splice".

When nothing at all is used, that's an error called "run-on sentence"
or "fused sentence".

When a coordinating conjunction is used to join the two main clauses,
then a comma is used instead of the semicolon.

Coordinating conjunctions are FANBOYS:

F = for; A = and; N = nor; B = but; O = or; Y = yet; S = so

(I believe that "while" sometimes is used as a coordinating
conjunction, which is disapproved by Fowler's.)

When the second sentence is subordinate, no punctuation is required.

(Sometimes, special rules allow the omission of some
punctuation in the case of very small clauses.)

So, one writes, for example,

He wore a lovely hat. It was his only defense.
He wore a lovely hat; it was his only defense.
He wore a lovely hat, for it was his only defense.
He wore a lovely hat because it was his only defense.
Pamela
2020-01-14 14:02:19 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
Post by Pamela
Joining them serves to connect their common idea. The text before and
after deals with a somewhat separate matter.
The usual guidelines recommend to join main clauses with a semicolon.
When a comma is used instead, that's an error called a "comma splice".
When nothing at all is used, that's an error called "run-on sentence"
or "fused sentence".
When a coordinating conjunction is used to join the two main clauses,
then a comma is used instead of the semicolon.
F = for; A = and; N = nor; B = but; O = or; Y = yet; S = so
(I believe that "while" sometimes is used as a coordinating
conjunction, which is disapproved by Fowler's.)
In my original example (copied below), isn't "and" being used as a
coordinating conjunction?

"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years are the results of his blood tests."
Post by Stefan Ram
When the second sentence is subordinate, no punctuation is required.
(Sometimes, special rules allow the omission of some
punctuation in the case of very small clauses.)
So, one writes, for example,
He wore a lovely hat. It was his only defense.
He wore a lovely hat; it was his only defense.
He wore a lovely hat, for it was his only defense.
He wore a lovely hat because it was his only defense.
Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-14 17:33:50 UTC
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Post by Pamela
In my original example (copied below), isn't "and" being used as a
coordinating conjunction?
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years are the results of his blood tests."
Post by Stefan Ram
When the second sentence is subordinate, no punctuation is required.
but is often a good idea anyway
Post by Pamela
Post by Stefan Ram
(Sometimes, special rules allow the omission of some
punctuation in the case of very small clauses.)
So, one writes, for example,
He wore a lovely hat. It was his only defense.
He wore a lovely hat; it was his only defense.
He wore a lovely hat, for it was his only defense.
He wore a lovely hat because it was his only defense.
Your original sentence really could use a comma (after the "are" is fixed);
but this set makes little sense, for why would the loveliness of the hat
have anything to do with protecting him? A "magic" hat, or an "armored"
hat, would make sense there.
John Dunlop
2020-01-14 18:10:18 UTC
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...
Post by Peter T. Daniels
Post by Stefan Ram
So, one writes, for example,
He wore a lovely hat. It was his only defense.
He wore a lovely hat; it was his only defense.
He wore a lovely hat, for it was his only defense.
He wore a lovely hat because it was his only defense.
Your original sentence really could use a comma (after the "are" is fixed);
but this set makes little sense, for why would the loveliness of the hat
have anything to do with protecting him? A "magic" hat, or an "armored"
hat, would make sense there.
This is Usenet. It's a tinfoil hat.
--
John
John Dunlop
2020-01-14 18:10:22 UTC
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Post by Stefan Ram
So, one writes, for example,
...
Post by Stefan Ram
He wore a lovely hat, for it was his only defense.
Not unless one wanted to appear old-fashioned or literary.

I've been on a David Crystal spree. His writing is excellent, as you
would expect, but he uses that sense of "for" -- very distracting!
--
John
Eric Walker
2020-01-15 10:38:06 UTC
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Post by John Dunlop
Post by Stefan Ram
So, one writes, for example,
...
Post by Stefan Ram
He wore a lovely hat, for it was his only defense.
Not unless one wanted to appear old-fashioned or literary.
I've been on a David Crystal spree. His writing is excellent, as you
would expect, but he uses that sense of "for" -- very distracting!
So, I have noticed, did that excellent stylist Rex Stout. Even the best
have their faults.
--
Cordially,
Eric Walker
Jerry Friedman
2020-01-13 15:47:08 UTC
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Post by Pamela
Post by Jerry Friedman
Post by Pamela
Which of these two sentences is correct? The capitals are used only to
identify the words in question.
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years ARE the results of his blood tests."
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years IS the results of his blood tests."
"One is", in standard grammar.
I don't mind the use of a singular subject of "is" with a plural
complement, "one is the results", but some do.
Couldn't the "ARE" apply to "results" as shown in the first example below?
I've used [*] to indicate a logical break.
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years [*] ARE the results of his blood tests."
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years IS [*] the results of his blood tests."
If you take out the dependent clause "he has asked about in recent
years", you get "There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain
puzzling and one are the results of his blood tests." I don't think
that's English.
--
Jerry Friedman
Mark Brader
2020-01-13 17:25:53 UTC
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Post by Pamela
Which of these two sentences is correct? The capitals are used only to
identify the words in question.
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years ARE the results of his blood tests."
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years IS the results of his blood tests."
Couldn't the "ARE" apply to "results"...?
No!
--
Mark Brader | "I dream of a better world where chickens can cross the road
Toronto | without having their motives questioned."
***@vex.net | --not Bill Murray
Mark Brader
2020-01-13 05:27:39 UTC
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Post by Pamela
Which of these two sentences is correct? The capitals are used only to
identify the words in question.
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years ARE the results of his blood tests."
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years IS the results of his blood tests."
Is.
--
Mark Brader | "Grammar am for people who can't think for *myself*.
Toronto | Understanded me?"
***@vex.net | -- Buck (Get Fuzzy: Darby Conley)
soup
2020-01-13 13:22:25 UTC
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Post by Pamela
Which of these two sentences is correct? The capitals are used only to
identify the words in question.
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years ARE the results of his blood tests."
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years IS the results of his blood tests."
IMHO Both. Context is king!
Depends on whether you see/comprehend the results as singular or plural.

Imagine a file folder with sheets of results in them "oh this folder IS
the results.
Now imagine them presented as lots of pieces of paper "oh these sheets
ARE the results.

C.F. 'Team' is sometimes singular sometimes plural
Peter T. Daniels
2020-01-13 14:35:14 UTC
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Post by soup
Post by Pamela
Which of these two sentences is correct? The capitals are used only to
identify the words in question.
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years ARE the results of his blood tests."
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years IS the results of his blood tests."
IMHO Both. Context is king!
Depends on whether you see/comprehend the results as singular or plural.
Imagine a file folder with sheets of results in them "oh this folder IS
the results.
Wrong. "This folder holds/has/contains the results."
Post by soup
Now imagine them presented as lots of pieces of paper "oh these sheets
ARE the results.
C.F. 'Team' is sometimes singular sometimes plural
Dialectal. May be (must be?) plural in BrE, never(?) in AmE.
Mark Brader
2020-01-13 18:02:40 UTC
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Post by soup
Post by Pamela
Which of these two sentences is correct? The capitals are used only to
identify the words in question.
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years ARE the results of his blood tests."
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years IS the results of his blood tests."
IMHO Both. Context is king!
Depends on whether you see/comprehend the results as singular or plural.
Irrelevant. The subject is "one", so the verb is "is".
Post by soup
Imagine a file folder with sheets of results in them "oh this folder IS
the results.
Now imagine them presented as lots of pieces of paper "oh these sheets
ARE the results.
These exmaples are inverted, and the subject is "the results", so the
verb must be "are".
Post by soup
C.F. 'Team' is sometimes singular sometimes plural
"C.F." should be "cf." and usually introduces a noun or the equivalent,
not a sentence.
--
Mark Brader, Toronto | "I can be gullible about these kinds of things.
***@vex.net | Or so people tell me, and I believe them."

My text in this article is in the public domain.
Stefan Ram
2020-01-13 13:59:22 UTC
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Pamela <***@gmail.com> did NOT write:
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years is the results of his blood tests."

One can simplify the sentence:

There are aspects, and one is the results.

One /can/ write:

There are aspects, and one of them is the /set (collection) of/ results.

But see also:

"529 singular and plural (7): mixed structures"
in Practical English Usage (Third Edition, 2005)
by Michael Swan

.
Pamela
2020-01-14 11:42:20 UTC
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Post by Pamela
"There are aspects of Jack's illness which remain puzzling and one he
has asked about in recent years is the results of his blood tests."
There are aspects, and one is the results.
There are aspects, and one of them is the /set (collection) of/ results.
"529 singular and plural (7): mixed structures"
in Practical English Usage (Third Edition, 2005)
by Michael Swan
I looked up section 529 in that edition (it's now section 130 in the 4th
edition).

The discussion in the first two entries is most relevant. Thank you.

1: "one of the few women who have climbed Everest"
2: "A serious problem is wasps"
--
4th ed: https://b-ok.cc/book/5234687/8b0020
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