Discussion:
How to make sparkling wine out of wine
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b***@googlemail.com
2019-01-10 20:22:46 UTC
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Hello all together,

is there an english word for the german verb "versekten"?
Versekten means making sparkling wine out of normal wine.
Thabks in advance for any help!
s***@gowanhill.com
2019-01-10 20:32:43 UTC
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Post by b***@googlemail.com
is there an english word for the german verb "versekten"?
Versekten means making sparkling wine out of normal wine.
If it's CO2 injection (Schaumwein), informally: "carbonation".

In the European Union sparkling wines made via this method must use terms 'aerated sparkling wine' and 'aerated semi-sparkling wine', supplemented where necessary with the words 'obtained by adding carbon dioxide' or 'obtained by adding carbon anhydride.'

Also see: Charmat method

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sparkling_wine_production#Charmat_method

Owain
b***@googlemail.com
2019-01-10 20:52:17 UTC
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Thank you for this information.
So i have a very good sparkling wine here.
It is correkt to say it is a carbonated riesling?
bill van
2019-01-10 21:06:10 UTC
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Post by b***@googlemail.com
Thank you for this information.
So i have a very good sparkling wine here.
It is correkt to say it is a carbonated riesling?
If it was made as a sparkling wine and you purchased it as a sparkling wine,
then I think it remains a sparkling wine. If you added the carbonation
yourself,
you can call it a carbonated riesling.

bill
s***@my-deja.com
2019-01-11 00:26:09 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by b***@googlemail.com
Thank you for this information.
So i have a very good sparkling wine here.
It is correkt to say it is a carbonated riesling?
If it was made as a sparkling wine and you purchased it as a sparkling wine,
then I think it remains a sparkling wine. If you added the carbonation
yourself,
you can call it a carbonated riesling.
bill
If you do call it a carbonated riesling then nobody
will be entirely happy, as it is a term not in
common circulation.

Carbonated drinks are normally thought of as Cola,
Tonic Water and the like - the things you often see
in cans which the Americans call "soda" and the
English call "pop".

"Sparkling Riesling" would do much better for the wine.
bill van
2019-01-11 01:57:33 UTC
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Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by bill van
Post by b***@googlemail.com
Thank you for this information.
So i have a very good sparkling wine here.
It is correkt to say it is a carbonated riesling?
If it was made as a sparkling wine and you purchased it as a sparkling wine,
then I think it remains a sparkling wine. If you added the carbonation
yourself,
you can call it a carbonated riesling.
bill
If you do call it a carbonated riesling then nobody
will be entirely happy, as it is a term not in
common circulation.
Carbonated drinks are normally thought of as Cola,
Tonic Water and the like - the things you often see
in cans which the Americans call "soda" and the
English call "pop".
"Sparkling Riesling" would do much better for the wine.
Yes, but it would be misleading advertising. It hides the fact that somebody
used mechanical means to carbonate the stuff at home. If you knew that,
would you still buy it?

bill
s***@my-deja.com
2019-01-11 10:45:05 UTC
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Post by bill van
Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by bill van
Post by b***@googlemail.com
Thank you for this information.
So i have a very good sparkling wine here.
It is correkt to say it is a carbonated riesling?
If it was made as a sparkling wine and you purchased it as a sparkling wine,
then I think it remains a sparkling wine. If you added the carbonation
yourself, you can call it a carbonated riesling. bill
If you do call it a carbonated riesling then nobody
will be entirely happy, as it is a term not in
common circulation.
Carbonated drinks are normally thought of as Cola,
Tonic Water and the like - the things you often see
in cans which the Americans call "soda" and the
English call "pop".
"Sparkling Riesling" would do much better for the wine.
Yes, but it would be misleading advertising. It hides the
fact that somebody used mechanical means to carbonate the
stuff at home. If you knew that, would you still buy it? bill
I think there is a mismatch between the idea of pressurising
wine at home and that of then selling it. In my mind using a
Sodastream machine (or whatever they might be called where
you are) to inject CO2 into a still wine is the precursor of
home consumption rather than commercial sale.

It would be interesting to learn if the Sekt made by
carbonation makes this clear in the large print or
the small print.

One would think that the majority of Sekt on commercial
sale was produced by the tank method.

(Unless anybody knows better)
charles
2019-01-11 08:10:41 UTC
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Post by s***@my-deja.com
Post by bill van
Post by b***@googlemail.com
Thank you for this information.
So i have a very good sparkling wine here.
It is correkt to say it is a carbonated riesling?
If it was made as a sparkling wine and you purchased it as a sparkling wine,
then I think it remains a sparkling wine. If you added the carbonation
yourself,
you can call it a carbonated riesling.
bill
If you do call it a carbonated riesling then nobody
will be entirely happy, as it is a term not in
common circulation.
Carbonated drinks are normally thought of as Cola,
Tonic Water and the like - the things you often see
in cans which the Americans call "soda" and the
English call "pop".
I don't think it's been called "pop" for about 80 years. "Fizzy drink" is
the usual term.
Post by s***@my-deja.com
"Sparkling Riesling" would do much better for the wine.
--
from KT24 in Surrey, England
"I'd rather die of exhaustion than die of boredom" Thomas Carlyle
s***@gowanhill.com
2019-01-11 10:48:04 UTC
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Post by charles
I don't think it's been called "pop" for about 80 years. "Fizzy drink" is
the usual term.
"juice" in Scotland, where mothers shake the baby's bottle to get the fizz out before giving it to the baby.

Owain

Ken Blake
2019-01-10 21:12:27 UTC
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Post by b***@googlemail.com
Thank you for this information.
So i have a very good sparkling wine here.
It is correkt to say it is a carbonated riesling?
If it's very good, that's unlikely to be what it is. Carbonating wine
is the way low-quality sparking wine is made. Some sekt is made by
carbonation, but the good stuff is made by a secondary fermentation
inside the bottle. That second fermentation, known as Méthode
Champenoise, traps the resulting carbon dioxide in the bottle and
that's what makes the bubbles.

If there's any English verb for that second fermentation, I can't
think of it.
b***@googlemail.com
2019-01-10 21:23:28 UTC
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Super posting, thank you blake!
Ken Blake
2019-01-10 21:53:14 UTC
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Post by b***@googlemail.com
Super posting, thank you blake!
You're welcome. Glad to help.
J. J. Lodder
2019-01-10 22:06:21 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by b***@googlemail.com
Thank you for this information.
So i have a very good sparkling wine here.
It is correkt to say it is a carbonated riesling?
If it's very good, that's unlikely to be what it is. Carbonating wine
is the way low-quality sparking wine is made. Some sekt is made by
carbonation, but the good stuff is made by a secondary fermentation
inside the bottle. That second fermentation, known as Méthode
Champenoise, traps the resulting carbon dioxide in the bottle and
that's what makes the bubbles.
If there's any English verb for that second fermentation, I can't
think of it.
By Euro decree 'Methode Champenoise' does not exist anymore.
It is not allowed to put it on any label,
except of course in the Champagne, where it is not needed..
It has been replaced in other regions
by terms such as 'Methode Traditionelle',
'Mothode Ancestrale' etc.

Jan
Quinn C
2019-01-10 22:47:15 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
Post by b***@googlemail.com
Thank you for this information.
So i have a very good sparkling wine here.
It is correkt to say it is a carbonated riesling?
If it's very good, that's unlikely to be what it is. Carbonating wine
is the way low-quality sparking wine is made. Some sekt is made by
carbonation, but the good stuff is made by a secondary fermentation
inside the bottle. That second fermentation, known as Méthode
Champenoise, traps the resulting carbon dioxide in the bottle and
that's what makes the bubbles.
If there's any English verb for that second fermentation, I can't
think of it.
The German/Austrian product "Sekt" doesn't have to be made by the
"méthode champenoise", some shortcuts are allowed, but not adding
carbonation.
--
Democracy means government by the uneducated,
while aristocracy means government by the badly educated.
-- G. K. Chesterton
Ken Blake
2019-01-10 23:38:09 UTC
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On Thu, 10 Jan 2019 17:47:15 -0500, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
Post by b***@googlemail.com
Thank you for this information.
So i have a very good sparkling wine here.
It is correkt to say it is a carbonated riesling?
If it's very good, that's unlikely to be what it is. Carbonating wine
is the way low-quality sparking wine is made. Some sekt is made by
carbonation, but the good stuff is made by a secondary fermentation
inside the bottle. That second fermentation, known as Méthode
Champenoise, traps the resulting carbon dioxide in the bottle and
that's what makes the bubbles.
If there's any English verb for that second fermentation, I can't
think of it.
The German/Austrian product "Sekt" doesn't have to be made by the
"méthode champenoise",
Right. As I said "Some sekt is made by carbonation..."
Quinn C
2019-01-11 03:21:07 UTC
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Post by Ken Blake
On Thu, 10 Jan 2019 17:47:15 -0500, Quinn C
Post by Quinn C
Post by Ken Blake
Post by b***@googlemail.com
Thank you for this information.
So i have a very good sparkling wine here.
It is correkt to say it is a carbonated riesling?
If it's very good, that's unlikely to be what it is. Carbonating wine
is the way low-quality sparking wine is made. Some sekt is made by
carbonation, but the good stuff is made by a secondary fermentation
inside the bottle. That second fermentation, known as Méthode
Champenoise, traps the resulting carbon dioxide in the bottle and
that's what makes the bubbles.
If there's any English verb for that second fermentation, I can't
think of it.
The German/Austrian product "Sekt" doesn't have to be made by the
"méthode champenoise",
Right. As I said "Some sekt is made by carbonation..."
Now this is a drastic example of malicious snipping. Good enough to be
featured in a book on the toxic discourse culture on the Net.
--
"Bother", said the Borg, as they assimilated Pooh.
bozo_de_niro@Yahoo.com
2019-01-11 02:50:14 UTC
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Post by s***@gowanhill.com
Post by b***@googlemail.com
is there an english word for the german verb "versekten"?
Versekten means making sparkling wine out of normal wine.
If it's CO2 injection (Schaumwein), informally: "carbonation".
In the European Union sparkling wines made via this method must use terms 'aerated sparkling wine' and 'aerated semi-sparkling wine', supplemented where necessary with the words 'obtained by adding carbon dioxide' or 'obtained by adding carbon anhydride.'
Also see: Charmat method
https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Sparkling_wine_production#Charmat_method
Owain
Why is "carbonation" the only way you can aerate a beverage with a gas, and why not pure oxygen?

And what's so special about Champagne and its European equivalents?
Jenny Telia
2019-01-11 00:28:42 UTC
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Post by b***@googlemail.com
Hello all together,
is there an english word for the german verb "versekten"?
Versekten means making sparkling wine out of normal wine.
Thabks in advance for any help!
Yes, in English the phrase is "spoiling a good wine"
Peter Moylan
2019-01-11 05:58:22 UTC
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Post by Jenny Telia
Post by b***@googlemail.com
Hello all together,
is there an english word for the german verb "versekten"? Versekten
means making sparkling wine out of normal wine. Thabks in advance
for any help!
Yes, in English the phrase is "spoiling a good wine"
+1

I must say, though, that it's a pleasure seeing a new arrival in the
newsgroup posing a question and then hanging around to see and respond
to the answers. It makes a big change from the drive-by posters.
--
Peter Moylan http://www.pmoylan.org
Newcastle, NSW, Australia
Jenny Telia
2019-01-11 07:43:59 UTC
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Post by Peter Moylan
Post by Jenny Telia
Post by b***@googlemail.com
Hello all together,
is there an english word for the german verb "versekten"? Versekten
means making sparkling wine out of normal wine. Thabks in advance
for any help!
Yes, in English the phrase is "spoiling a good wine"
+1
I must say, though, that it's a pleasure seeing a new arrival in the
newsgroup posing a question and then hanging around to see and respond
to the answers. It makes a big change from the drive-by posters.
I assure you Mr. Moylan, I do more than drive-by post. I just don't
think most reactions are worth responding to.
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