Discussion:
marked on
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tonbei
2018-01-09 19:07:06 UTC
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I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.

Next I called the dispatcher.
"Can you tell me if Lieutenant Marino is marked on?" I asked.
She came back to me. "He's marked on"
(Cruel and Unusual by P. Cornwell)

context: The narrator's talking with the city police station's dispathcer.
question about: the meaning of "be marked on".

I guesss it is a police jargon, meaning he's out on patrol.
There must be a board with lamps to show which detective is on duty.
Am I right?
Stefan Ram
2018-01-09 19:17:49 UTC
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Post by tonbei
"He's marked on"
...
Post by tonbei
There must be a board with lamps to show which detective is on duty.
"To be marked on" can mean "to be marked" / "to be on a list".

Disclaimer: The above is just a guess. I'm not a native speaker.
Harrison Hill
2018-01-09 19:21:53 UTC
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Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
Next I called the dispatcher.
"Can you tell me if Lieutenant Marino is marked on?" I asked.
She came back to me. "He's marked on"
(Cruel and Unusual by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's talking with the city police station's dispathcer.
question about: the meaning of "be marked on".
I guesss it is a police jargon, meaning he's out on patrol.
There must be a board with lamps to show which detective is on duty.
Am I right?
We've had this question before. The list of people who
are "on" duty as opposed to people who are "off" duty, needs to be
marked somewhere.

It might be "a board with lamps". Unlikely though, and the "mark"
will probably be a tick or a cross, made with a "marker pen" perhaps.
Sam Plusnet
2018-01-13 22:43:14 UTC
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Post by Harrison Hill
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
Next I called the dispatcher.
"Can you tell me if Lieutenant Marino is marked on?" I asked.
She came back to me. "He's marked on"
(Cruel and Unusual by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's talking with the city police station's dispathcer.
question about: the meaning of "be marked on".
I guesss it is a police jargon, meaning he's out on patrol.
There must be a board with lamps to show which detective is on duty.
Am I right?
We've had this question before. The list of people who
are "on" duty as opposed to people who are "off" duty, needs to be
marked somewhere.
It might be "a board with lamps". Unlikely though, and the "mark"
will probably be a tick or a cross, made with a "marker pen" perhaps.
Most Royal Navy ships, when in port, have a quite elegantly-made board
at the head of the gang-plank with a list of the officers.
Against each there is a small shutter which covers either the word
"Aboard" or "Ashore".
--
Sam Plusnet
Horace LaBadie
2018-01-09 20:41:42 UTC
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Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
Next I called the dispatcher.
"Can you tell me if Lieutenant Marino is marked on?" I asked.
She came back to me. "He's marked on"
(Cruel and Unusual by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's talking with the city police station's dispathcer.
question about: the meaning of "be marked on".
I guesss it is a police jargon, meaning he's out on patrol.
There must be a board with lamps to show which detective is on duty.
Am I right?
A policeman can be on duty while in the station house or precinct
building. The "duty" board is usually just a board listing all the names
of the personnel assigned to the precinct or station, with a place to
make a checkmark or something similar to indicate duty status. It might
be a blackboard in older stations.
Colonel Edmund J. Burke
2018-01-09 20:46:15 UTC
Permalink
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
Next I called the dispatcher.
"Can you tell me if Lieutenant Marino is marked on?" I asked.
She came back to me. "He's marked on"
(Cruel and Unusual by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's talking with the city police station's dispathcer.
question about: the meaning of "be marked on".
I guesss it is a police jargon, meaning he's out on patrol.
There must be a board with lamps to show which detective is on duty.
Am I right?
You limeys are so far behind the US it's ridiculous!
LOL
Peter Duncanson [BrE]
2018-01-09 21:45:01 UTC
Permalink
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
Next I called the dispatcher.
"Can you tell me if Lieutenant Marino is marked on?" I asked.
She came back to me. "He's marked on"
(Cruel and Unusual by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's talking with the city police station's dispathcer.
question about: the meaning of "be marked on".
I guesss it is a police jargon, meaning he's out on patrol.
There must be a board with lamps to show which detective is on duty.
Am I right?
As others have indicated there will be a board with officers' names on
it. Next to each name will be a mark of some sort to indicate whether
the person is "on duty" or "off duty".

So "marked on" is short for "marked as 'on duty'"

This is an example of an ON-DUTY LOCATOR:
Loading Image...

It is an illustration of its use in a medical context.
--
Peter Duncanson, UK
(in alt.usage.english)
John Varela
2018-01-10 19:38:43 UTC
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On Tue, 9 Jan 2018 21:45:01 UTC, "Peter Duncanson [BrE]"
Post by Peter Duncanson [BrE]
Post by tonbei
I have a question about the following sentences from a novel.
Next I called the dispatcher.
"Can you tell me if Lieutenant Marino is marked on?" I asked.
She came back to me. "He's marked on"
(Cruel and Unusual by P. Cornwell)
context: The narrator's talking with the city police station's dispathcer.
question about: the meaning of "be marked on".
I guesss it is a police jargon, meaning he's out on patrol.
There must be a board with lamps to show which detective is on duty.
Am I right?
As others have indicated there will be a board with officers' names on
it. Next to each name will be a mark of some sort to indicate whether
the person is "on duty" or "off duty".
So "marked on" is short for "marked as 'on duty'"
https://www.magnatag.com/img/products/ODL/ODLcover.png
It is an illustration of its use in a medical context.
The statement, as quoted, threw me, too. It would have been much
clearer if the original had put "on" in quotes:

She came back to me, "He's marked 'On'."
--
John Varela
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